Voyages au pays des mangeurs de grenouilles: La France vue par les Britanniques du XVII siecle a nos jours

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Author: L.G. Mitchell
Date: Sept. 1994
From: The English Historical Review(Vol. 109, Issue 433)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Document Type: Book review
Length: 592 words

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According to Paul Gerbod, the images and prejudices with which English visitors have approached and returned from France have been remarkably consistent over the last two hundred years: 'de William Pitt a Margaret Thatcher, il s'est elabore, outre-Manche, une certaine idee de la France'. Using a wide selection of journals, diaries and letters, in Voyages au pays des mangeurs de grenouilles. La France vue par les Britanniques du [XVII.sup.e] siecle a nos jours (Paris: Albin Michel, 1991; pp. 245. Pb. F120) he sets out to chronicle the impressions of the English who went to France as visitors, or who stayed there as prisoners, businessmen, or refugees from things English. M. Gerbod is at his best when chronicling the infrastructure of travel. Numbers, destinations, guidebooks, cemeteries and clubs for the English abroad are lovingly described. The Promenade des Anglais in Nice was so named in 1823, the same year...

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Source Citation
Mitchell, L.G. "Voyages au pays des mangeurs de grenouilles: La France vue par les Britanniques du XVII siecle a nos jours." The English Historical Review, vol. 109, no. 433, 1994, p. 1018+. Accessed 23 July 2021.
  

Gale Document Number: GALE|A16408900