Interview: Irene Morgan Kirkaldy discusses the 1944 in which she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white couple

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Date: Aug. 5, 2000
From: Weekend All Things Considered
Publisher: National Public Radio, Inc. (NPR)
Document Type: Broadcast transcript
Length: 658 words
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JACKI LYDEN, host:

Sometimes the most powerful and true stories are forgotten. Eighty-three-year-old Irene Morgan Kirkaldy's is one of them. Back in 1944, the young black woman boarded a Greyhound bus in rural Virginia to head home to Baltimore, sitting in the back in the negroes only section. When a white couple boarded, the white bus driver ordered Irene Morgan to give up her seat. She refused. Thus began a court battle that would not end until the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in interstate commerce was unconstitutional. This weekend, the town of Gloucester, Virginia, honors Irene Morgan Kirkaldy. We called her there to tell us about that bus trip.

Ms. IRENE MORGAN KIRKALDY: I refused to give up my seat because I had my ticket. I paid my fare and I didn't feel that it was right for him to tell me that I would have to get up and give my seat for another person who had just gotten on the bus....

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Source Citation   (MLA 8th Edition)
"Interview: Irene Morgan Kirkaldy discusses the 1944 in which she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white couple." Weekend All Things Considered, 5 Aug. 2000. Gale Academic Onefile, Accessed 18 Sept. 2019.

Gale Document Number: GALE|A166104158