Synergizing Culture: African American Cultural Recovery through African Name Acquisition and Usage

Citation metadata

Author: Itibari M. Zulu
Date: July 2017
From: Journal of Pan African Studies(Vol. 10, Issue 5)
Publisher: Journal of Pan African Studies
Document Type: Essay
Length: 11,205 words

Main content

Abstract :

This essay is focused on the cultural political formations that have influenced the prevalence of African name acquisition and usage by African Americans in the U.S. after the Civil Rights era to the present. It is argued that a personal name is an inalienable human right with supporting evidence of psychological paradigms that may explain why most African Americans do not have an African name. The presentation draws on personal observation, involvement and knowledge discussions with persons with and without African names in the U.S. since 1971, and it recommends that people of African heritage in the U.S. and elsewhere aggressively begin to embrace African names and African naming practices. Key concepts/words: African anthroponymy, African names, African naming practices, Afrophobia, Fanonism, inalienable human right, internalized oppression, internalized racism, Kawaida, Negro-to-Black Conversion Experience, Mentacide, Negritude, Nigrescence Theory, Nkrumahism, post traumatic slave syndrome.

Source Citation

Source Citation
Zulu, Itibari M. "Synergizing Culture: African American Cultural Recovery through African Name Acquisition and Usage." Journal of Pan African Studies, vol. 10, no. 5, July 2017, pp. 128+. Accessed 7 Dec. 2022.
  

Gale Document Number: GALE|A518337660