Has the Internet Won the Hearts of Chinese College Students? A Comparative and Communication Medium Dependency Approach

Citation metadata

Author: Joanne Chen Lyu
Date: Apr. 2019
From: China Media Research(Vol. 15, Issue 2)
Publisher: Edmondson Intercultural Enterprises
Document Type: Report
Length: 6,759 words

Main content

Abstract :

China has a huge population of young netizens. With the rapid rise in use of the web in China, the integration of the Internet into the existing media system is influenced by individual dependency on traditional media, and vice versa. This study examines Ball-Rokeach and DeFleur's (1979) media dependency theory using Chinese college students as the sample. The Internet has tremendously changed the information environment in China, enabling people to bypass traditional media to secure more diverse information, especially in threatening situations. Survey of Chinese college students found that while the Internet satisfied the young Chinese "goals" at both individual and social levels, the "goals" they pursued from dependency relations with traditional media were mainly social ones. Contrary to the theory, when the young people perceived the environment as threatening, their dependency on traditional media decreased significantly rather than increased; their Internet dependency was high in threatening situations, but it did not vary greatly from that in everyday life. In contrast, interpersonal communication was significantly intensified in threatening situations. Our results also indicated that the Chinese youth depended more on the Internet than traditional media. An in-depth discussion about the findings was carried out at the end. Keywords: The Internet dependency, traditional media dependency, dependency intensity, threatening situations, Chinese College students

Source Citation

Source Citation
Lyu, Joanne Chen. "Has the Internet Won the Hearts of Chinese College Students? A Comparative and Communication Medium Dependency Approach." China Media Research, vol. 15, no. 2, Apr. 2019, pp. 91+. Accessed 23 Sept. 2021.
  

Gale Document Number: GALE|A585719389