THE ART OF STORYTELLING: A COLLEGIATE CONNECTION TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS

Citation metadata

Author: KATHRYNE MCGRATH SPEAKER
Date: Fall 2000
From: Education(Vol. 121, Issue 1)
Publisher: Project Innovation (Alabama)
Document Type: Article
Length: 1,628 words

Main content

Abstract :

Current research concerning the Art of Storytelling reiterates what classroom teachers who employ it in their classrooms have suspected all along. Storytelling can enhance cognition in many specific ways. Children involved in storytelling programs exhibit improved listening skills, better sequencing abilities, increased language appreciation and more thoughtful organization in their own writing. The benefits of becoming familiar with the concept of an oral tradition are numerous. However, even though the research is overwhelmingly positive, elementary schools do not employ storytelling techniques on a consistent basis. Furthermore, most Schools of Education do not require a course in Children's Literature and Storytelling of all their Early, Elementary and Middle School Education majors. This paper proposes a way to utilize the link between Professional Development Schools and Schools of Education by bringing together elementary students and preservice student teachers for a shared experience in storytelling after both groups have acquired some background knowledge and expertise in storytelling techniques. It also surveys the children involved in the program at The College of New Jersey in order to ascertain whether the experience changed their own reading habits and encouraged them to read more frequently.

Source Citation

Source Citation
SPEAKER, KATHRYNE MCGRATH. "THE ART OF STORYTELLING: A COLLEGIATE CONNECTION TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOLS." Education, vol. 121, no. 1, 2000, p. 184. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.
  

Gale Document Number: GALE|A66960821