New Breast Cancer Findings from Johns Hopkins University Discussed (Extracellular Matrix-bound Fgf2 Mediates Estrogen Receptor Signaling and Therapeutic Response In Breast Cancer).

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Date: Feb. 25, 2021
Publisher: NewsRX LLC
Document Type: Report
Length: 491 words
Lexile Measure: 1470L

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2021 FEB 25 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Women's Health Weekly -- New research on Oncology - Breast Cancer is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating from Baltimore, Maryland, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The extracellular matrix (ECM) is often unaccounted for in studies that consider the stromal contribution to cancer cell signaling and response to treatment. To investigate the influence of a fibrotic microenvironment, we use fibroblast-derived ECM scaffolds as a cell culture platform."

Funders for this research include NIH National Cancer Institute (NCI), Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Foundation for Health and Policy, Emerson Collective, Allegany Health Network, National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA, SKCCC Core Grant, V Scholar Foundation.

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Johns Hopkins University, "We uncover that estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cells cultured within ECM-scaffolds have an increase in ER signaling that occurs via an MAPK-dependent, but estrogen-independent manner. The ECM acts as a reservoir by binding, enriching, and presenting growth factors to adjacent epithelial cells. We identified FGF2 as a specific ECM-bound factor that drives ER signaling. ER+ cells cultured on ECM matrices have reduced sensitivity to ER-targeted therapies. The sensitivity to ER-targeted therapy can be restored by inhibiting FGF2-FGFR1 binding. ECM-FGF2 complexes promote Cyclin D1 induction that prevents G(1) arrest even in the presence of antiestrogens."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This work demonstrates that the ECM can drive ER signaling and resistance to endocrine therapy, and suggests that patients with ER+ breast cancer that have high mammographic breast density may benefit from existing FGFR-targeted therapies."

This research has been peer-reviewed.

For more information on this research see: Extracellular Matrix-bound Fgf2 Mediates Estrogen Receptor Signaling and Therapeutic Response In Breast Cancer. Molecular Cancer Research, 2021;19(1):136-149. Molecular Cancer Research can be contacted at: Amer Assoc Cancer Research, 615 Chestnut St, 17TH Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19106-4404, USA. (American Association for Cancer Research - www.aacr.com; Molecular Cancer Research - mcr.aacrjournals.org/)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Daniele M. Gilkes, Johns Hopkins University, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Baltimore, MD 21231, United States. Additional authors for this research include Josh W. DiGiacomo, Ines Godet and Michael Trautmann-Rodriguez.

Keywords for this news article include: Baltimore, Maryland, United States, North and Central America, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Screening, Cancer, Cellular Structures, DNA-Binding Proteins, Diagnostics and Screening, Drugs and Therapies, Estrogen Receptors, Extracellular Matrix, Extracellular Space, Health and Medicine, Mammogram, Mammography, Oncology, Proteins, Risk and Prevention, Steroid Receptors, Transcription Factors, Women's Health, Johns Hopkins University.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2021, NewsRx LLC

The citation for this news report is: NewsRx. New Breast Cancer Findings from Johns Hopkins University Discussed (Extracellular Matrix-bound Fgf2 Mediates Estrogen Receptor Signaling and Therapeutic Response In Breast Cancer). Women's Health Weekly. February 25, 2021; p 248.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A652572519