Full Citation

  • Title Background information and talking points in preparation for President Richard M. Nixon's trip to Berlin, West Germany. Issues include: U.S.-West Berlin relations; West Berlin economic situation; the possibility of West Berlin Mayor Klaus Schuetz visiting the U.S.; political situation in West Berlin
  • Classification Level Confidential
  • Imprint [United States: Department Of State, 1969]
  • Declassified Date March 13, 2003
  • Sanitization Unsanitized
  • Completeness Complete
  • Collection Declassified Document Reference System
  • Pages 5
  • Language English
  • Document Type Memo
  • Source Library Department of State
-- - etrzo ceda! at e Naiona, A,,cNves DLC LASSII1171Ll) Authority £O By NARA Date~IV3 7 . ------ ....:............ NFIDENTIAL NE/GER- 11 Feb. 13, 1969 Talking Points -Berliners '~ \Mayor SchUletZ will have the March 5 Bundesversammlun& and access to Berli.n very much on his mind when you see him --you might tell him that you are following this problem closely, and that it is your view that if the Soviets and East Gt rmans cause trouble, the election of the President will not be the cause but the pretext. --Tell him that the three Embassies in Bonn and the Foreign Office are working closely together on Berlin, and that there are carefully worked out plans for meeting contingencies that: could arise. --If Schuetz brings up the problem of convoying German civilians in Allied vehicles, an idea some Germans.have raised in the past, you could point out that this will be studied if the situation deteriorates. CONFIDENTITAL DECL ,' lt i-L)epmouceo ai ne Nationai Archives Authority £ 0 By~ NARA Date%IIV N \E/GER-11 CONF IDEMT A L ---You may wish to assure Schuetz that we regard Berlin as an area of special responsibilityand national interest to the United States and that we Will meet our obligations.there. -Mayor Schuetz will also be concerned about his student problems. Hear him out and . tell him that this is a world-w~ide problem. Ask him whether reforms in the universities will help meet.the problem in Berlin. xsayor _Sc j ma Want to discuss the econo)cpolm of Berlin(-ncpolm -You could say that this is largely a German Problem, Which is-one reason we have encouraged the FRG activities in Berlin. There are somelimportant American invt- ments in Berlin, and if other American firms show. interest '~will certainly en- * CoUrage them. CONFIDENTITAL ReProciucea at !he National Archives Authority ____________ By~ NARA Date%/lV NE /GER-1 CONFIDENTIAL -He will want to talk about Berlin's long- range problem of aging population and reluctance*of young, people to remain. Possibility of Governing Mayor's Visit to U.S. -At the end of your talk with him, you might wish to suggest to Schuetz that he visit you at the White House. (This has become a tradition.. Every post-war Berlin Mayor has visited the President of the United States.) Drafted by: EUR/GERImhof~ Cleared by: EUR - Mr. Puhan - 1UR/GER M r. JhPl S/S-S:LWKalker. _x7552, Rm. 7239 C ONF I DEN T AL DECL SSII itvReproduced at the National Archives By W NARA DatA/I /b CONFI DENTITAL NE/GER-13 Feb. 13, 1969 -The Political and Economic Situation -Berlin Political Situation The supreme authority in Berli n is the Allied Kommiandatura which is responsible for the exercise of the occupation authority of France, the U.K., and the U.S. The *city is governed, however, by the Governing Mayor, his deputy, the Berlin Senat (a kind of city cabinet) and an elected House *of Representatives which chooses the Governing Mayor and the Senat. The politi- cal spectrum is entirely dominated by parties (SPD, CDU, and FDP) which are strongly attached to Western democratic principles. The Social.Democratic Party, headed by Governing Mayor Schuetz, gained a substantial majority (57%~) in the last election in 1967. It governs the city with minor participation of its Berlin coalition partner, the small Free Democratic Party (8%). The opposition CDU is the second largest party (33%). There is a small communist party (the SED) which has been unsuccessful at the polls (it obtained only 2% in 1967). Efforts have also been made to estab- lish the extreme nationalist NPD in Berlin. The NPD has only a few members and no influence,3 but its existence invites Eastern criticism. The political situation is stable although youth and student leftist disturbances have been a source of embarrassment and trouble for the city administra- tion. The Social Democratic Party has traditionally been the governing party in thie,city and, despite some internecine jockeying in the party, there is no threat to its continued predominant.influence. The present leaders, how,,ever, lack the political charisma of the Brandt period. CONFIDENTIAL Reproaucea, at the Nationai Arcnwves DECLAjb1t1tAJ Authority EA~. %__LGV By j NARA Date~S/ ~ NE/GER-13 CONFIDENTIAL -2- Economic Situation The economy of the city is essentially good. Over the long range, however, it is seriously troubled by an unfavorable demographic situation owing to an excess of old people; the difficulty in attracting new younger people to the city;. and the' iso- lation of the city. Essential to its economy is.free- dom of access and the maintenance of confidence in the future of Berlin. Also essential is the assistance of the Federal Republic which, among, other things, transfers about $1.3 billion annually to the city. In turn, Berlin pays taxes to the Federal Republic of about $750 million. Fifty per cent of the city's budget is subsidized by the Federal Republic and the city benefits from West German tax concessions. There is significant American investment in Berlin. Among others, there are sizable subsidiaries of IT&T, National Cash Register, IBM, and Kaiser Aluminum. We estimate the value of American investment in the city to be about $150 million. IDrafted by: EUR/GER:EDCrowley -Cleared by: EITR/GER - Mr. Johnpoll! EUR - Mr. Puhan I E - Mr. Kennon LS/S-S:LWalker, x7552, Rm. 7239, CONF IDENTITAL