Full Citation

  • Title Mrs. Mary Eales's receipts. Confectioner to her late majesty Queen Anne
  • Author Eales, Mary
  • Imprint London : printed by H. Meere in Black-Fryers, and to be had at Mr. Cooper's at the Three Pidgeons the lower End of Bedford-Street, near the New Exchange in the Strand, MDCCXVIII. [1718].
  • Collection Science, Technology, and Medicine I
  • Pages 107
  • Language English
  • Document Type Monograph
  • Microfilm Reel # 5421
  • ESTC Number T90918
  • Physical Description [8],100p. ; 8°
  • Source Library British Library
Mrs Mary Ealess RECEIPTS. CONFECTIONER to her late MAJESTY Queen ANNE. LONDON: Printed by H. ME ERE in Black- Fryers, and to be had at Mr. Cooper's at the Three Pidgeons the lower End of Bedford- Street, near the New Excbauge in the Strand,. M DCCXVII . /. THE CONTENTS. O d;y Angelica Page i To preserve green Apricocks 2 To make Goosberiy. Clear-Cakes To make Goosberiy-Pafle 4 To dry Goosberries 5 To preserve Goosberries 6 To dry Cherries 7 To make Cheriry-7am .. 8 To dry Cherries without Sugar ibid. To dry Cherries in Bunches 9 To make Cherry-Pafte ib. To preserve Cherries . I To dry Currants in Bunches, &c,' II To make Currant .Clear-Cakes 12 To preserve red Currants . . 13 To. mak ' Cwr-fnt-Pafte, ieiher red or ·white ib. A2 To To preserve whbite Currants 14 To preserve Rasberries 15 To make Jam of Rasberries I6 To make Rasberiy-PafJe ib, To make Rasberry Clear-Cakes 17 To make Rasberry-Drops 18 To dry Apricocks ib. To dry Apricocks in Quarters or Halves 19 To make Paring-Chips 20 To preserve Apricocks 21 To make Apricock Clear-Cakes 22 To make Apricock-Pafle 23 To make Apple-7e y for all Sorts of Sweet- Meats ib. To make Apricock-7am 24 To preserve green Jennitins ib. To dry green Plums 2 To ,dry Ambler, or any white Pl7ums 26 To dry black Pear-Plhms, or Mrfcles, or the Great Moguls 28 To preserve black Pear-Plums or Dama- scenes 3o To preserve white Pear-Pltms ib. To make white Pear-Plutm Clear-Cakes 31 To make white Plum Pase 32 To make red Plum Clear-Cakes 33 To make red Plum-Pafle 34 To dry Plums like the French Phmis, with Stones in them ib. To To dry Peaches 35 To make Peach-Chips 36 To preserve or dry Nutmeg-Peaches 37 To preserve Cucumbers ib. To dry green Figs 39 To day black Figs 40 To preserve Grapes 41 To dry Grapes ib. To dry Barberries 42 To preserve Barberries 43 To make Barberry-Drops ib. To make white Quince-Maarmalet 44 To make red Quince-Marmalet 45 To preserve wbhole Quinces 46 To make Quince'Chis. 47 To make Quince-Pale 48 To make OQince Clear-Cakes ib. To preserve Golden or Kentifh-Pippins 49 To preserve whole Oranges or Lemmons o5 To dry Oranges in Knots, or Lemmons 52 To make China-Cbips 54 To make Orange-Pafle ib. To make Orange-Drops 55 To make Orange-Marmalet 56 To make Orange or LemmonClear.Cakes ib. To:make Pomegranate Clear-Cakes 58 To make Orange-Halves, or Quarters, with the Meat in them 59 To preserve Citrons 60 To To make Citron-Marmalet x' Ta candy Orange-Flowers ib To make Rock-Sugar 63 To make Fruit-Bifcuit 65 To make all Sorts of Sugar-Pafie 66 To make Chocolate-Almonds . 7 To make Wormlwood-Czkes ibl To make Honycomb-Cakes of Orange- Flower-Violet of Cowslips 68 To make Ice Almond.Cakes ib. To make Bean d-Bread 69 To make Orange or Lemmon-Puffs 7Q To make Almond-Pafle, either Bitter or Sweet 71 To make little round Ratafea-uffs 72 To make Brown TFafers ib. To make Almond-Loaves 73 To make Chocolate-Puffs '74 To make Ratafea-Drops, either of Apri- cock-Kernels, or half Bitter and half Sweet-Almonds ib, To make all Sorts of Sugar-Puffs .75 To make Almond-Pafle - -ib. To make long Biscuit '76 -To make Spiunge-Bifcuit -. - - :7 To rmake round Bifcui it wit Coriantdt- .Seeds ' 7.8 To make Hartfiorn-Jelly -79 'To make Lenmmon-J ely , '' TO To make Butter'd'Orange 80 To make Eringo-Cream ib. IT make Barley-Cream - 8 Tn make Ratafea-Creaa ib. 'To make Almond-Butter 82 TI- make a Trifle j. .. ib- To make all Sorts of Fruit-Cream 83 To make Sack-PoJet, or Sack-Cream ib. To make Blamange 84 Lemmon-Cream, made with Cream 85 To make Citron-Cream ib. To make Piftato-'ream . 86 To make Ciouted-Cream ib. To make a very thick, raw CGetm 87 To make Spanifh-Butter ib. To mnake Orange-Butter 88 To make Almond-Butter 89 To make Trout-Cream ' ib. To make Almond-Cream 9o To make Raw-Almond, or-kiatafea-GCeam 91 To make Chocolate-Cream ib. To make Sego-Creaen 92 To ice Cream ib. To make Hartjhorn-Flummery 93 To make petfum d Ptifels 94 To burn Almonds 95 ,Tnfmake Lemmon-Wafers ib. To candy little green Oranges 97 To To candy Cowslips, or any Flowers or Greens, in Bunches ib. To make Caramel 98 To make a good Green 99 To Sugar all Sorts of small Fruit ib. To scald all Sorts of Fruit Ioo Mr. I'1 [ I ] Mrs. EALES'S RECEIPTS. To dry AN G E L IC A. i^ii a A K E the Stalks of An- !}1;~ gelica, and boil them " 'T i tender then put them to drain, and {crape off H i~,~ all the thin Skin, and put them into scalding Water; keep them close cover'd, and over a flow Fire, not to boil, 'till they are green; then draining them well, put them in a very thick Syrup of the Weight and half of Sugar: Let the Syrup be cold when you put them in, and warm it every Day'till B it [z] it is clear, when you may lay 'em out to dry, sifting Sugar upon 'em. Lay out but as much as you use at a Time, and scald the reft. To preserve Green AP R I COC KS. T A K E Apricocks before the Stones are very hard ; wet 'ern, and lay 'en in a coarse Cloth ; put to 'em two or three large Handfuls of Salt,rub 'em 'till the Roughness is off, then put 'em in scalding Water i set 'em over the Fire 'till they almost boil, -then set 'em off the Fire 'till they are almost- cold i do so two or three times after this, let 'em be close cover'd; and when they look to be green, let 'em boil 'till they begin to be tender weigh 'em, and make a Syrup of their Weight in Sugar, to a Pound of Su-, gar allowing half a Pint of Water to make the Syrrup; let it be almost cold before you put in the Apricocks ; boiL 'em up well'till they are clear - warm the Syrup daily, 'till it is pretty, thick. You may put 'em in a Codling- Jelly, [3] Jelly, or Hartfhorn Jelly, or dry them as you use them. To make Goosberry C L E A R-C A K E S. AKE a Gallon of white Goof- T berries, nose and wash 'em 3 put to 'em as much Water as will co- ver 'em almofr all over, set 'em on an hot Fire, let 'em boil a quarter of an Hour, or more, then run it thro' a Flannel Jelly-bag; to a Pint of Jelly have ready a Pound and half of fine Sugar, sifted thro' an Hair Sieve ; set the Jelly over the Fire, let it just boil up, then {hake in the Sugar, stirring it all the while the Sugar is putting in'; then set it on the Fire again, let it scald 'till all the Sugar is well melt- ed then lay a thin Strainer in a flat earthen Pa, ..pour in your Clear-Cake Jelly, and turn back the Strainer to tike off the Scum , fill it into Pots,and fetit in theStove to dry ; when it is candy'd oh thie Top, turn it out on Glass; and if your Pots are too big, cut ii; and when it is very dry, turn B 2 it [4] it again, and let it dry on the other Side; twice turning is enough.. Ifa.ny of the Cakes flick to the Glass, hold 'em over a little Fire, and they will come off: Take Care the Jelly does not boil after the Sugar is in : A Gal- ion of Goofberries will make three Pints of Jelly ; if more, 'twill not.be firong enough To make Goo s B E RRY-PA ST E. A K E the Goofberries,. nose and walh 'em, put to 'em as much. Water as will almoff cover'em,. and let 'em: boil a quarter of an: lour;. then ffrain. 'em thro' a thin Strainer,, or an Tair-Sieve, and allow to a. Pint of Li- quor a Pound and half of fine Sugar, sifted- thro' an Hair-Sieve before you put in the Sugar, set thee Liquor on the Fire, let it boil, and' scum it; then shake in the Sugar,, set it on the Fire again, and' let it scald t.'il1 all tlie Sugar is melted; then-fill it int, little Pots; when. it is: candy'd, turn it. out on, Glas ; and' when it. is 4iry on. one Side, [51 ] Side,turn it again; if any of the Cakes flick, hold the Glass over the Fire: You. may put some of this in Plates and when it is jelly'd, before it candies, cut it out in long Slices, and make Fruit-Jambals. To dry GoosBERRIES,. T AKE the large white Goofber- ries before they are very ripe, but at full Growth, flone and wafi 'em, and to a Pound of Goofberries put a Pound and half of Sugar, beat very fine, and half a Pint of Water set 'em on the Fire; when the Sugar is melted, let 'em boil, but not too fast ; take 'em off once or twice, that they may not break; when they be- gin to look clear, they are enough: Let'em stand all Night in the Pan they are boil'd in,. with a Paper laid elofe' to'em.; the next Day scald 'em very well, and let 'em stand, a Day or two:. then, lay 'em on Plates, sift 'em with 'Sugar very well, and put 'em in the Stove, turning 'em everyDay 'till they ·,~- ~._~ ~are [6] are dry; the third. Time of turning,you may ly 'em on a Sieve, if you please'; when they are pretty dry plbce'esii in a Box, with Paper betwixt every Row. To preserve G o o s B E R RP E S. T AKE the white Goofberries,ffamp and strain'em ; then take the lar- 'gest white Goofberries when they juiR begin to turn, tone 'em, and to half a Pound of the Goofberries put a Pound of Loaf Sugar beaten very fine, half a Pint of the Juice of that which is ftrain'd, (but let it stand 'till it is fettled' and very. clear) and fix Spoonfuls of Water; set 'em on a very quick Fire ;'let 'em boil as fast as you can make 'em, up to the Top of the Pan; when you fee the Sugar as it boils look clear, they are enough4 which will'be in less than half a quar- ter of an Hour: Put 'em, -in Pots or Glafles, paper 'em close; the next Day, if they are not hard enough jelty'4 set 'em for a Day or two. on an -loht Stove, or' in some warm Place, but' not in U 7 ] in the Sun ; and when they are jelly'd, put Papers close to 'em ; the;Papers must first be wet, and then dryid with a Cloth. - To dry CHERRIES. STONE the Cherries; and to ten Pound of Cherries, when. they are fton'd, put three Pound of Sugar very fine; beaten ; shake the Cherries and Sugar well together, set 'em on the Fire, and when the Sugar is well mfelted, give 'em a Boil or two-; let 'em stand in an earthen Pot'till the next Day, then make 'em scalding hot,' and,. when cold, lay 'em on Sieves afterwards put 'em in an Oven not too hot, where let 'em stand all Night, and then turn 'em, and put 'em in again. Let your Oven be no hotter than it is after finall Bread or Pies. When they are dry, keep 'em in a Box very close, with no Paper. be- tween them. TTo [8] To lake C £ E FRRY-JA . T AKE twelve Pound of fton'd Cherries, boil 'em, break 'em as they boil; and when you have boil'd all the Juice away, and can fee the Bottom of the Pan, put in three Pound of Sugar finely beaten, flir it well, and le 'em have two or three Boils ; then put 'em in Pots or Glasses. xx~r~·J~~i xxi J xxx i~ ~ x : x- -r".* *-' To dry Q H E R RI E without Sugar. T ONE the Cherries, and set 'em. S on the Fire, with only what Li- quor comes out of them e let them boil up two or three times, shaking thqem as they boil; then put themr in an eat.- then Pot; the next Day scald them, a'nd when they are cold lay 'em on, Sieves, and dry 'em in anr Oven not top, hot. Twice heating, an Oven will dry, any Sort of Cherries. .To . .~~~~~~~~~~~~ To dy Ct & RR tES i Bicbet. T'A KE K txF Cheritesot MoTi] and tye 'em in Bunches with a Thread, about a Dozen ina.aunch; and when you have dry'd your other Chdtriesl put the Syrup that they cotr'eiot of fto your Bunch'es * let 'eBi just boil mtner "em 'close, the next DayTfcald 'em i ahd wheh they aie cdid; ia, 'den .in Sie5es in 'a cool Oven; turn 'emi and heat the Oven evteri Day "till they are dly. ,I . , - . '.1 ' . . ,., ,s 3.! r:Ii . , -* '1 T a H fl * ' Y -t A'S k. ^TA( KElChkeirreise-see ain-dboil 'emin I'w ;bteaidkg Umi wel the Whilk, gAh toil 'em drty hy-, And: to *' iP-aiid' f C'hertie 'u't . a .Pound and a Q.uatihrbf iitgst fisired ithro' ah Hair Sieve ; let the Cherries be hot when you put in the Sugar; set it on tbe Fire 'till the Sugar is well melt- ed; put it in a broad Pan, or earthen Plates; let it stand in the Stove 'till it C is i. 'o 3 is candy'd ; drop it on Glass, and, when dry on one Side, turn it., To-pref.rve CH E'RRI E:S,- . , E Itheri Morella :oriCarnations, ftine the: Cherries :: :To 'Morella :her- ries, take the'elly.iof white Curranits, drawn;with -a little Water 'and-.rfi thro' a Jelly-bag a Pint and-:half of.the jelly, and three Pounds of fine Sugar, set it on a quick Fire;; when-iit:boils, scum it, and put in two Pounds of the fton'diCherries; let.'em not boil too faR, at sirs, take 'em of some Times when they are, tender, boil 'e.m'Rvery fast 'till they jelley, an' are very .lear ;i then put-'en- in'. te Pots;-or ,Glaes.. The Carnation Cherries mrift have red Currants-Jelly ; ad .if you can get no white Currants,. C6dlin§- Jelly will serve fprthe Morella, , ' . r ..* :.' ; 5 -TO . ' , ... I - To dy U R A N TS in Bi'ncbei 'r ., oose Sprigs. ;xT HE N.your.Currants.are fton'd land' .ty'd up -in -.Bunches, take to a Poundof Currants a'Pound and half 'of- Sugar; to a Pound of Su- gar .put half.a.'Pint of.Water:; boil your Syrup v.ery well, and' lay the Currants into the-Syrup; set 'em on the..Fire, let' 'en j.ust boil,: take. 'em off; -and cover 'em close 'with a Paper let 'em ftaind 'till the next 'Day, .and ·then make 'elm scalding. hot -let 'em Itand twwo or- three' Days'..with. the Paper 'close to'em, then.hlay 'em on earthen Plates, and sift 'em well with Sugar ; put.'em into a Stove, the next -Day lay 'em on Sieves, but not,-turn 'emii till that Side. drys, then turn 'em, andlfift the other Side'';. Whini. they are dry lay 'em between Papers.. C2 To To nte CUPR4NB T CLGF 4 R.QEl. T R IP the Currants, wash 'em, and to a Gallon of Currants put abaut a Quart of Water ; boil it ve.y well run it thro' a Jelly-b3g; to a Pint of Jelly put a Pound and ialf. of $ugar, sifted thro' an Hir $ieve ; set your Jelly on the Fire, let it jus boil then fliake in the Sugar, stir it well and set it on the Fire,'anj make it scalding hot ; then put 'it thro':a _trainer in a broad Pan; tp tale off the Scum, and fill it in Pots; When it is candy'd, turn it on Glass 'till that Side be dry; then turn it agaipn tb'dry to thp other Side. Red and yhite Currants are done the fame Way ; but as soon as the Jel- ly of the White is piadp;p yoiu njp it itto tio te gar, or it wiU)I ealgeeo- lour. ' To [ Ii3, To preserve R D C URRANT 5. AM A S H the Currants, and. strain L"em thro' a thin Strainer ; take a Pint of Juice, a 'Pound and half of Sugar, and fix Spoonfuls of Water; let it boil up, anid Tum it very well; then put in half a Pound of fton'd Currants; hoil ?em as fast as you can 'tilF7:he Currants are -clear, and jelly very well ; put 'em in Pots or Glafies, an when' they ar cold, paper 'em as .other Swea7t-meats. Stir all finall Fruit as they cool1 to mix it with the J1iy. Tf make .v tRRA T-PA S T E, eiter f d' or White. STRIP the- Currnts and t :a little Water to 'em, just to ~eep 'em from flicking to the Pan; boil 'em well, and rub 'em thro' a Hair Sieve. To a Pint of Juice put a Pound and a half of Sugar sifted; but first boil the Juice after it is ftrain'd, [ 4 ] ftrain'd, and then shake in your Su- gar: Let it scald 'till the Sugar is melted ; then put it in little Pots in a Stove, and turn it as other Paste. To prefe've WH I T E CU RRA N T S. AKE the large white Currants; not the Amber-colour'd, itrip 'em, and to two Quarts of Currants put a Pint of Water ; boil 'em very faft,and run 'em thro' a Jelly-bag; to.a Pint of Juice put in a Pound and half of Sugar, and half a Pound of fton'd Currants; set 'em on a quick Fire, let 'em boil very fast 'till the Currants are clear,and jelly -very well then put 'elp in Pots or Glafles; flir 'em as they cool, to make the Currants mix with the Jelly: Paper 'em down when almost coJd. T' it [ 15 ] To preserve R A-S B E R I E S. T A K E the Juice ofredjand white 1 Ra'fberries 3 (if you have no white Rafberries, use. half..Codlingr Jelley) put a Pint and half of the Juice to two Pound of Sugar,; let it boil, scum it, and then put in three Quarters of a. Pound of large Raiber. ries; let 'em boil very fast 'till they jelley, and are very clear ; don't take 'em off the Fire, for that will make 'em hard ; a Quarter of' an'our will do 'em, after they begin to boil fai; then put *em in' Pots or Glafes: Put the Ralfberries in first, then firain the Jelly from the Seeds, and put it to the Rafberries. When they begin to.cool, stir 'em, that they may not all lye up- on the Top'os the Glasses; and when they arej cold, lay Papers'clofe to 'em; fi:rst wetei the Paper, then 'dry it in a Cloth. ' ''' ' To To ort JA k óf R ' IA'?h is^i' E s. - d. i dWirihalf, if t e.uice to bt r th ats hs es t i:, N11i it fa d:. Qnti ttt fd in -tor I the'n to PititOf Ri'ftiiri iit titfe QUatts :f a 'Pu' ' of. Stiaat, aDh Vi1 it 'till it jdllitE Put it iiit' Pt ' _: c ' :; , ..:.. -,fTi oIs. A)S B.KE RY-PA I$-T -Es, L' A Ak S H the Rafberries, strain half, tY: :.and put the Juime to .the othe halaf with the See',ds, boil 'mn iaist -si airter of ;fr:Houi, ;i ad fro aPint of. Rafbterespuut halfi a iPint, of, . 'Currants, ,bil'd with vexy, li-tte Wa- ter, and ftrain'd thro' a thin Sttrina, or Hair Sieve; let the Currants and Rafberries boil together a little while: Then to a Pint of Juice put a Pound -id a Quarter of sifted Sugar ; set it over the Fire, let it scald, but not boil; fill fill it in little Pots, set it in the Stove 'till it is caSdy'd, then turn It out on Glasses, as other Cakes. t2 k RAstR1TY CLEAR-CAKES. A K E half Rafferries and half whitie Currants, almof cover 'em with Water 5 boil 'enm very well a Quarter of an Hour, then run'em thro' a Jelly-bag, and to every Pint of Jelly have ready a Pound and half of fine Sugar sifted thro' an Hair Sieve; set the elly on the Fire, let it just boil, then shake in your Sugar, tir it well, and set it on the Fire a second Tine,'till the Sugar is melted; then lay a Strain- er in a broad Pan to prevent the Scum, and fill'it into Pots: Wheri it is can- dy'd, turn it on Glass, as other Clear- Cakeds D' To [ 18 ] To make RA S B E RRY-D R O P S. A S H the Rafberries, put in a lit- tle Water, boil and firain'em, then take half a Pound of fine Sugar, sifted thro' an Hair Sieve; just wet the Sugar to make it as thick as a Paste put to it 20 Drops of Spirits of Vitriol, set it over the Fire, making it scalding hot, but not to boil: Drop it on Paper it will soon be dry , if it will not come off easily, wet the Paper. Let 'em lye a Day or two on the Paper. To drA AP RICOC KS. T AKE four Dozen and a Half of the largest Apricocks, sone 'em and pare 'em cover 'em all over with four Pound of Sugar finely beaten; put some of the Sugar on 'em as you pare 'em, the reft after: Let 'em lye four or five Hours, 'till the Sugar is al!noft melted i then set 'em on a flow Fire 'till quite melted ; then boil 'em, but [ 9 1 hut not too fast. As they grow ten- der, take 'em out on an earthen Plate 'till the reft are done ; then put in those that you laid out first, and let 'em have a Boil together: Put a Paper close to 'em, and let 'em stand a Day or two ; then make 'em very hot, but not boil; put the Paper on 'em as before, and let'em stand two Days,then lay.'em on earthen Plates in a Stove, with as little Syrup on 'em as you can ; turn 'em every Day 'till they are dry, and scrape off the Syrup as you turn 'em; lay 'em between Paper, and let 'en not be too dry before you lay 'em up. To dy A P R I c o C KS in Quarters or Halves. 'T '.AKI E four Pound of the Halves I 'or Quarters, pare 'em, and, put to 'em tnree Pound of Sugar fine bea- ten i:'trew, some on 'em as you pare 'en, anl cover em with the ret' ' let 'em i.lye four or' five' Hours 'fter- wards set 'em. on , 'aflo Fire, i S 3ars i-smel:tetd~ th;en bool e',' b't D 2 not [ 'o ] not too fan, 'till they are tender, tak-, ing out those that are first tender; and puting'e i , 'e again,let em ave a Boil together; theri lay 4 Paper close to 'em, scald 'ena very well,' and let 'em lye a Day or two in the Syrup: Lay em on earthen Plates, with as little Syrup o 'em as you can, turning em every Day 'till they are dry i at lat4, lay 'em between Paper in Boxes. To make PAAING-CHIPS. A S you pare your Apricock's, save .. the clearest Parings, and throw a little Sugar on 'em ; half a Poiund is' fuficient to a Pound of the Paring~; set 'em on the Fire, let 'e-m jut boil up, and set'em by 'till the next Day drain the Syrup. from 'em, andL IPkC$a. Syrup. with a Puound qs ciar apd almpflt .als a Pint of .Vater boil t eSugar very wel,' and ut'. asnTiuct: to 'the Chips when it is cold ,as wi'l. . c nh. ,and m' t . ru~i ca; i- t i anv-;-, in hv xt:i' 5:·" /P,': !rt [ 2 ] cold, lay 'em out on Boards, sift 'em with Sugar, and turn 'em on Sieves. To preserve AP RT o C K .S. T A K E four Dozen of large Apri cocks, stone and pare''m, an:d cover 'em with three Pound of fine beaten Sugar, strewing some on as yow pare 'em ; let'em fland, at leaf, fix or seven Hours, then boil 'em on a spw Fire 'till they are clear and tender if some of 'em are clear before the reft, take 'em out, and put 'em in again when the reft are ready. Let 'em stand, with a Paper close to 'em' 'till the next DgDy tlien make Cod- ling-Jelly very strong : Take twq Pints of Jelly, two Pound of Sugar, ,oil it 'till it jellies ; and whilff it is bpiliing, make your Apricocks scald- Ing hoqt, and put the jelly to your Apricocks, and boil 'em together but not too fast. When the Apricockcs rife in the Jelly, and they jelly very well, put em into Pots or Glasses, with Papers close to 'em. To [ 22 ] To make APRICOCK CLEAR- CAKES ... . AKE about three Dozen of T Apricocks, pare 'em, and put thereto a Pound of fine Sugar, -and boil'em to Pieces . then put to 'em two Quarts of Codling-Jelley, boil 'em to- gether very fast for a Quarter of an Hour; run it thro' a Jelly-bag, and to a Pint of Jelly put a Pound and half of Sugar, sifted thro' .a Hair Sieve i while the Jelly boils, {iake in your Sugar, and let .it scald 'till the Sugar is melted ; then put it thro' a thin Strainer, in a broad ear- then Pan ; fill it in Pots, and dry it as other Clear-Cakes. If you wou'd have some with Pieces in 'em, cut some of your dry'd Quarters finall; and when the Strainer has taken off the Scu im, take some of the Jelly in a Pan, put in the Pieces, make itfcalding hot again, and fill it out. T -,? [ 3] To make A P R IC C K - PA S T E. T A KE two Pound of Apricocks par'd, and a Pound of Sugar fine beaten, let 'ern.lye in the Sugar'tillit is melted ; then boil it well and maih it very small put to it two Pints of Codling-Jelly ; let ,' boil together ; and to a Pound of i puta Pound and a Quarter of rifted Sugar ; let your Paste boil before you put your Sugar to it, then let it scald 'till the Sugar is melted ; fill it in Pots, and dry it in the Stove, turning it as other Paste. To make A P P LE JE LLY for all Sorts of SwEET-MEATS. E T your Water boil in the Pan ,you make it in; and when the Apples are par'd and quarter'd, put 'em into the boiling Water; let there be no more Water than just to cover 'em-, and let it boil as fafl as pofible when the Applesiare all to Pieces, put in;a about a Quart of Water more ; let !' *:, 4 .'"'~ 'Iit [ 4 j it boil at lea{i half an Hour; and then run it thro'a Jelly-bag.: In the Sutnmer, Codlings are best; in September, Gol- den Rtlnnets and Winete.Pippins. To rtake' A P R C o c K -J A M. T A E tto Potiid of Apricocks par'd; and a Pint of Codling- Jelly, boil 'eti very faff together till the Jelliy i almost wafted i theri put to it a Poun ad anhalf of fine Sugar, and boil it very faf etill it jellies; put it into Pots or Glasses, You may make frefi. Cdler-CGaes witif this, and sip' pin-Jelly, in the Winter. TO ptefrve GREEN JEj N N i NS C UT ot the Stalk and Nose, aid pt'era' in cold Water on a Coal- Fire 'till they peel ? then put 'em in the fame Water, and cover 'em very close ; set 'etn on a flow Fire 'till they .are green and render - thesn, to a Pound [ z5 ] Pound of Apples take a Pound and half of Sugar, and half a Pint of Wa- ter; boil the Syrup, put in the Apples, and boil 'em fast, 'till they are very clear, and the Syrup very thick, al- mofi at a Candy; then put in half a Pint, or more, of Codling-Jelly, and the Juice of a Lemon, boil it 'till it jellies well, and put 'em in Pots or Glasses. To dry GREEN PLUMS. AKE the green Amber Plum, prick it all over. with a Pin; make Water, boiling hot, and. put in the Plums, be sure you have so much Water, that it be not cold with the Plums going in; cover'em very close, ajad when they. are almost 'cold, set 'em on the tire.again,. but not to let 'em boil ; do so three or four Times when 'youfe, the thin Skin'crack'd, fling in a Handful of Allum fine bea- ten, and keep 'em in a Scald 'till they begin to be green, then give 'em a Boil close cover'd.: When they.are green, -E let [ 6] let 'em stand all Night in fresh hot Water; the next Day have ready as much clarify'd Sugar as will cover em drain your Plums, put 'em into the'Sy- rup,and give'em two or three Boils ; re- peat it two or three Days, 'till they are very clear; let 'en stand in their Syrup above a Week; then lay 'em out on Sieves, in a hot Stove, to dry: If you would have your Plums green very soon, instead of Altm, take Ver- digreece finely beaten, and put in Vi- negar; shake it in a Bottle, and put it into 'em when the Skin cracks ; let 'em have a Boil, and they will be very soon green; you may put some of'ei inCodling-Jelly, sirss boiling the Jelly with the Weight in Sugar. Tv diy A M BER, o0 any WHITE P L U MS. S LT your Plums in- the Sea.t'; then make a thin Syrup. If you have any Apricock-Syrup eSft, after your Apricocks atre dry ', put a Pint of Syrup -to tirOQuarts -of 'Water if you [ 27] you have none, clarify fingle-refin'd Loaf-Sugar, and make a thin Syrup: Make the Syrup scalding hot, and put in the Plums; there must Le so much Syrup as will more than cover the Plums they muff be kept under the Syrup, or they will turn red : Keep 'em in a Scald 'till they are tender, but not too soft; then have ready a thick Syrup of the fame Sugar, cla- rify'd and cold, as much as will cover the Plums i let 'em boil, but not too fast, 'till they are very tender and clear, setting 'em some times off the Fire; then lay a Paper close to 'em, and set 'em by'till the next Day; then boil 'em again 'till the Syrup is very thick; let 'em lye in the Syrup four or five Days, then lay 'em on Sieves to dry: You may put some in Codling- Jelly, first boiling the Jelly with the Weight in Sugar, and put in the PlinRs hot to the Jelly. Put 'em in Pots or Glasses. ^A Th [ 28 3 To dry BLACK PEA R-PLU M S, or MUSCLES, or the GREAT MOGULS. STONE your Plums, and put'em in a large Earthen Pot ; make a Syrup with a Pound of fingle-refin'd Sugar and three Pints of Water ; or if you have the Syrup the white Plums are dry'd out of, thin it with Water, it will do as well as Sugar; boil your Syrup well, and when it is cold enough to hold your Hand in it, put it to the Plums ; cover 'em close, and let 'em stand all Night; heat the Syrup two or three Times, but never too hot; when they are tender, lay 'en on Sieves, with the Slit downwards to dry; put 'em in the Oven, made no hotter than it is after Bread or Pyes comes out of it ; let 'em stand all Night therein ; then open 'em and turn 'em, and set 'em in a cool Oven again, or in an hot Stove, for a Day or two ; but if they are too dry, they will not be fmnooth 5 then make a Jam to fill 'em with. Take ten Pound of Plumbs, the fame Sort of your Skins, cut 'em off the Stones, put [ 29 put to 'em three Pound of Powder-Su- gar i boil 'em on a flow Fire, keeping 'em stirring 'till it's so isiss, that it will lye in a Heap in the Pan ; it will be boiling at least four or five Hours lay it on Earthen Plates; when it is cold, break it with your Hands, and fill your Skins then wath every Plum, and wipe all the Clam off with a Cloth: As you wash 'em, lay 'em on a Sieve; put 'em in the Oven, make your Oven as hot as for your Skins; let'em fland all Night, and they will be blue in the Morning. The great white Mo- gul makes a fine black Plum; stone 'em, and put 'em in the Syrup with or after the black Plum ; and heat the Syrup every Day, 'till they are of a dark Colour; they will blue as well as the Muscles, and better than the black Pear-Plums. If any of there Plums grow rusty in the tWinter, put 'em into boiling hot Water; let 'em lye no longer than to be well wash'd: Lay 'em on a Sieve, not singly, but one on the other, and they will blue the bet- ter: Put 'em in a cool Oven all Night, theywill be as blue and freth as at first. To [3°0 To preserve BLACK PEAR-PLUM or DAMASCENES. AKE two Pound of Plums, and cut'em in the Seam; then take a Pint and half of Jelly, made of the fame Plum, and three Pound and a half of Sugar ; boil the Jelly and Sugar, and fcun it well; put your Plums in a Pot; pour the Jelly on 'em scalding hot: When they are alioft cold, heat 'em again ; so do 'till they are tender, and then let 'em stand two or three Days, heating 'em every Day i then boil 'em 'till they look clear and jelly: Don't boil 'em too fast. To preserve WHITE PEAR-PLUMS. SLIT your Plums, and scald 'em in a thin Syrup; as for drying 'em, put 'em in a thick Syrup of clari- fy'd Sugar, as much as will cover em ; let 'em boil very flow, 'till they are very clear, sometimes setting 'em off [3'] off the Fire: They must have the Weight, or something more, of clari- fy'd Sugar in the Syrup: When they are very tender and clear, put to a Pound of Plums (when they are raw) a Pint of Apple-Jelly, and a Pound of fine Sugar, and boil it 'till it jellies ; before your Plums are cold put 'em into the Jelly, but not above half the Syrup they were boil'd in, Iand boil 'em together'till they jelly well: Put 'em in Pots or Glasses, with Papers close to 'em. You may keep some of 'em in Syrup, and put 'em in Jelly as you use 'em. To make WHITE PE AR - PLU M C LE A R-C A KE S. T AKE a good Quantity of white Pear-Plums, as many as you think w-i'll make three Pints, with as muTh boiling Water as will cover'em; boil'em very fast, 'till they are all to Pietes 3 then have ready three Pints -of Apple -Jelly, and put it to the Plums, iboiling em very fat together; then [ 32 then run it thro' a Jelly-bag: To a Pint put a Pound and half of sifted Sugar 5 first boil the Jelly, and ihake in the Sugar; let it scald on the Fire 'till it is melted ; put it in Pots in the Stove ; dry and turn it as other Clear- Cakes. To nmake WHITE PLUM-PASTE. T HAKE a Pound of fine Sugar, and a Pint of Water, or more, as the Quantity you intend to make requires; set it on the Fire, let it boil, and set a Pan of Water to boil when it boils, put in your Plums; let 'em juft-boil, and then take'em out with a Ladle, as they flip their Skins off take off the Skins, and put the Plums into the Syrup i do this as fast as you can, that they may not turn: Boil 'em all to Pieces; and to a Quart of Plums put a Pint of Apple-Jelly boil 'em well. together, and rub it thro' a Hair Sieve to a Pint of this put a Pound and a half of sifted Su- gar ; let the Jelly boil before you shake [33] shake the Sugar, and let it scald 'till the Sugar is well melted ; Ikin it, put it in Pots, and dry it in the Stove. I QcCOOC^C00 mSO CO CsOC To make RED PLUM CLEAR- CAKES. T AKE white Pear-Plums, half White and half Black, or if you have no Black, one third of Damfins, and as much Water as will cover 'em ; boil 'em very well ; and to a Quart of the Plums put a Quart of Apple-Jelly; boil 'em very well together run it thro' a Jelly-bag ; to a Pint of the Jelly put a Pound and Half of Sugar; let the Jelly boil, then shake in the Sugar; let it scald, but not boil ; put it thro' a thin Strainer in a broad Pan, to take off the Scum, and put it in Pots in a Stove: When it is candy'd, turn it as other Clear-Cakes: You may make it paler or redder, as you belt like, with more or less black Plums. F To [34] To make RED PLUM -PASTE T AKE half white and half red Plums, as you did for the Clear-Cakes; boil 'em with as much Water as will cover 'em i then, to a Quart of Plums put a Pint of Apple- Jelly 3 let 'em boil well together rub it thro' an Hair Sieve; to a Pint of Jelly put in a Pound and Half of Sugar ; boil the Jelly, and ihake in the Sugar i let it scald 'till the Sugar is melted, flin it well, and fill in Pots; dry it as other Cakes: You may put some of this in Plates, and make Fruir-Jambals. To dry PLU M S like the FRENCH PL U M S, with Stones in them. THEN you have laid out all VWV your Plums that are to be ftopt, put white Pear-Plums, or any large black Plums, in an Earthen Pot, and make your Plum-Syrup al- inoft scalding hot ; put it to the Plums, [ 3 ] Plums, and scald the Syrup every Day, 'till the Plums are tender and red ; then lay 'em on Sieves, and dry 'em in an Oven, turning 'em every Day 'till they are dry; then lay'em between Papers, and keep 'em in a dry Place. To dly P E AC H E S. OTONE the largest white NTevping- ton Peaches, and pare 'em, and have ready a Pan over the Fire with boiling Water ; put in the Peaches, and let 'em boil 'till they are tender ; then lay 'em on a Sieve to drain out all the Water; weigh 'em, and lay 'em in the Pan you boil 'em in, and' cover'em with their Weight in Sugar; let 'em lye two or three Hours; then boil 'em 'till they are clear, and the Syrup pretty thick; set 'em by co- ver'd, with a Paper close to 'em; the next Day scald 'em very well, setting 'em off the Fire and on again, 'till the Peaches are thorough hot; repeat this ifr three Days ; then lay 'eml on Plates F 2 to 1 36 ] to dry, and turn 'em every Day 'till dry. To nake PEACH-CHIPS. ARE the Peaches, and cut'em in thin Chips ; to four Pound of Chips put three Pound and a Half of fine beaten Sugar; let the Sugar and Chips lye a little while, 'till the Sugar is well melted, then boil 'em fast 'till they are clear; about half an Hour will do 'em enough i set 'em by 'till the next Day, then scald 'em very well two Days, and lay 'em on Earthen Plates in a Stove; sift on 'em fine Sugar, through a Lawn Sieve; turn 'em every Day, sifting 'em 'till lmnoft dry; then lay 'em on a Sieve a Day or two more in the Stove : Lay 'em in a Box close together, and when they. have lain so a Week, pick 'em, asunder, that they may not be in Lumps. Ta [37 ] To preserve or dcy NUTMEG-PEACHES. EEL the Peaches, and put 'em in boiling Water; let 'en boil a Quarter of an Hour; lay 'em to drain, weigh 'em, and to a Pound of Peaches put a Pound of fine Sugar beaten very finall; when the Sugar is pretty well melted, boil 'em very fast 'till they are clear set 'erm by 'till they are cold; then scald 'em very well ; take to every Pint of Peach a Pint of Codling-Jelly and a Pound of Sugar boil it 'till it jellies very well, then put in the Peaches and half the Syrup; let 'em boil fast; then put 'em in Pots or Glasses If you wou'd dry 'em, scald 'em three or four Days, and dry'em out of their Syrup. To preserve CUCUMBE R S. AKE Cucumbers of the fame Bigness that you wou'd to pickle; pick 'em fresh, green, and free from Spots; boil 'em in Water 'till they are 1 38 ] are tender; then run a Knitting-needle through'em the long Way, and scrape off all Roughness then green 'em, which is done thus: Let your Water be ready to boil, take it off, and put in a good Piece of Roach-Allurm set it on the Fire, and put in the Cu- cumbers ; cover 'em close 'till you fee they look green ; weigh 'em, and take their Weight in fingle-refin'd Sugar clarify'd ; to a Pound of Sugar put a Pint of Water ; put your Cucumbers in ; boil 'em a little clofe-cover'd ; set 'em by, and boil 'em a little every Day for four Days; then take 'em out of your Syrup, and make a Syrup of double-refin'd Sugar, a Pound of Su- gar and half a Pint of Water to every Pound of Cucumbers ; put in your Cucumbers, and boil 'em 'till they are clear; then put in the Juice of two or three Lemmons, and a little Orange- flower-water, and give 'em a Boil altogether: You may either lay'eln out to dry, or keep 'em in Syrup; but every Time you take any out, make the other scalding hot, and they will keep two or three Years. Ta [39] To dry GREEN FIGS. A KE the white Figs at the full Bigness, before they turn Co- lour flit 'em at the Bottom ;. put your Figs in scalding Water; keep 'em in a Scald, but not boil 'em 'till they are turn'd Yellow then let 'em fRand 'till they are cold ; they must be close co- ver'd, and something on 'em to keep 'em under Water; set 'em on the Fire again, and when they are ready to boil, put to 'em a little Verdigreafe and Vinegar, and keep 'em in a Scald 'till they are green; then put 'em in boiling Water ; let 'em boil 'till they are very tender; drain 'em well from the Water, and to every Pound cla- rify a Pound and Half of fingle-refin'd Sugar, and when the Sugar is cold put in the Figs ; let 'em lye all Night in the cold Syrup; the next Day boil 'em 'till they are very clear, and the Syrup thick, and scald 'em every Day for a Week ; then lay 'em to dry in a Stove,turning 'em every Day; weigh your Figs when they are raw; and when you clarify your Sugar, put V half [40 ] half a Pint of Water to a Pound of Sugar: If your Figs grow too dry, you may put 'em in their Syrup again they will look new to the End of the Year. Tot y BLACK FIGS. W Eigh the Figs, and flit 'em at the Bottom; put'em into boil- ing Water,and boil'em 'till they are ve- ry tender drain 'em well from the Water ; then make a Syrup of clarify'd fingle-refin'd Loaf-Sugar, with their Weight, and half a Pint of Water to a Pound of Sugar ; when the Syrup is cold put in your Figs; let'em lye all Night; the next Day boil 'em 'till they are very clear, and scald 'em eve- ry Day 'till the Syrup is very thick then lay 'em out as you use 'em ; but heat the Syrup after you have taken some out, or they will not keep: If they grow too dry, you may put 'em in the Syrup again, scalding .the Syrup. To [ 41] To preserve GRAPES. PEEL the Grapes and flone 'em put 'em in a Pan, cover 'em very close; first let 'etn boil, and set 'em some times on and off the Fire, 'till they are very green ; then drain all the Juice from 'em; and to a Pint of Grapes put a Pound and a Half of Sugar, and half a Pint of Apple-Jelly; let 'em boil very fast 'till they are clear, and jelly very well: Put 'em in Pots or Glafes, with Paper close to 'em. Todry G R A P E s. A KE the large Bell-Grapes, just before theyare ripe ; sone 'em in Bunches, and put 'em into scalding Water, covering 'em close with Vine- Leaves, and a Cover on the Pan ; keep 'em in a Scald, putting 'em on and off the Fire 'till they are green; then give 'em a Boil in the Water, drain 'em on a Sieve, and to every Pound G of [42] of Grapes make a thick Syrup of a Pound and a half of clarify'd Sugar ; and when the Syrup is cold, put in the CGrapes, a-nd scald 'em every Day 'till the Syrup is thick, but never let 'er boil; then lay'em out on Earth- en Plates, and sift 'em very well with Sugar; dry 'em in a Stove, and turn and sift 'em every Day. To dy B A R B E RRI E S. T A K E Barberries, sone 'em, and tye 'em in Bunches, or loose in Sptigs, which you please-; vweigh 'em; and to every Pound of Barberries clarify two Pound of Sugar ; make your Syrup with something more than half -a Pint of Water to a Pound of Sugar ; put the' Barberries into the: Syrup when it is scalding hot; set it on the Fi-e, and let 'em just boil; then set 'em by, with a Paper close to 'em-; the next Day make 'em scalding hot, doing so for two Days , but be fire they never! boil after the first Time ; when tseky are cold, lay 'em out [43] out on Earthen Plates; sift 'em well with Sugar, and the next Day turn 'em on a Sieve ; sift 'emt again, and turn 'em every Day 'till they are dry: Your Stove must not be too hot. To preserve BARBE RIE S. TONE the Barberries in Sprigs; and to a Pound of Barberries make a Syrup of a Pound and a Half of fine Sugar, with half a Pint of Wa- ter to a Pound of Sugar : Put the Bar- berries in the Syrup, and let 'em.have a Boil scald 'em every Day for four or five Days, but don't let 'em boil: Put'em in a Pot, and when you use any, heat the reft, or they will not keep. To make BARBERRY-DROP S. 'T" AKE a good Quantity of Bar- ,'iL berries, itrip 'em off the Stalks; 'put to 'em a little Water, to keep 'em '- G 2 from [44] from Burning; boil 'em, and mash 'em as they boil, 'till they are very dry; then rub 'em through an Hair Sieve, and afterwards itrain'em through a Strainer, that there may be none of the black Noses in it i make it scalding hot, and to half a Pint of the Pulp put a Pound of the sifted Sugar; let it scald, and drop it on Boards or Glasses 5 then put it in a Stove, and turn it when it is candy'd. To make WH I T E QU I N C E- M A M A L E T. A RE Quinces, and quarter 'em, putting as much Water as will cover'em, and boil 'em all to Pieces to make Jelly ; run it through a Jelly-bag then take a Pound of Quince, pare, quarter, and cut out all thp Hard of it; and to a Pound of Quinces put a Pound and a Half of Sugar fine beaten, and half a Pint of Water, and let it boil'till it is very clear ; keep it stirring, and it will .breakl [ 45] break as much as shou'd be; when the Sugar is boil'd to be very thick, almost a Candy, put in half a Pint of Jelly, and let it boil very fast 'till it jellies: As soon as you take it off, put in the Juice of a Lemon; skim it well,and put it in Pots or Glasses: It is the better for having Lumps in it. To make RE D QU I N C E-Ml A R- M A L E T. A R E the Quinces, quarter'em, 1 and cut out all that is hard; to a Pound of Qaiinces put in a Pound and a Half of Sugar, and halfa Pint of Juice of Barberries, boil'd with Water,as you do Jelly, or other Fruit; boil it very fast, and break it very finall; when it is all to Pieces, and jellies, it is enough: If you wou'd have the Mar- malet of a very fine Colour, put a few black Bullace to the Barberries when you make the Jelly. To [ 4 ] TopreferVe WHOLE QUINC E S. A KE a Pound of Quince par'd and quarter'd, cut out all the hard, put to it a Pound of fine Sugar and half a Pint of Water, and let it boil very fast 'till it is all to Pieces ; take it off the Fire and break it very well, that there be no Lumps in it; boil it 'till it is very thick and well jelly'd then take fine Muslin, and put your Quinces into it, and tye it up round. This Quantity will make three Quin- ces. Set 'em into three Pots, or China Cups, that will just hold one; cut off the Stalk-Endof the Quince, and putit in the Pot or Cup, to make a Dent in the Quince, that it may be like a whole Quince; let 'em stand two or three Days, that they may be very stiff ; take 'em out of the Muslin, and make a strong Jelly with Apples -and Quinces: Take two Pints of Jelly and two Pound of Sugar, boil it fal 'till it jellies very well ; then put in the Quinces, and let'emn have two or Three Boils to make 'em hot; put 'em in [ 47-] in Pots or Glafles, with Paper close to 'em. To make Qv I NC E-C H I P s. A R E the Quinces, and slice'em ' into Water; put 'em into boiling Water ; let'em boil fail 'till they are very tender, but not so soft as to break 'em - Take 'em out with a Skim- mer, lay 'em on a Sieve Still they are well drain'd, and have ready a very thick Syrup of clarify'd Sugar; put 'em into as much as will ,cover'em, thefn boil 'em 'till they are very clear, and. the next Day scald 'em and if you fee they want Syrup, put in a Pint more, but let it be very thick: Scald 'em twice more, then lay''em out on Earthen Plates in a Stove, sift 'em well with Sugar: Turn 'em and sift 'em 'till, they are dry. To [ 48 ] To make Qu I N C E-PA S t ,, :- ARE the Quinces, and quarter 'em i to a Pound of Quince put half a Pound. of Sugar and half a Pint of Water; boil it fast 'till the Quinces are all to Pieces ; then tub it very fine, 'till there be no Lumps in it, and put to it a Pint of Jelly of Quince, boil'd with as much Water as will cover 'em, and run through a Jelly-bag ; boil the Quinces Jelly together, and to a Pint of it put a Pound and a Quarter of fine Sugar; let it scald, but not boil, 'till the Su- gar is melted i skim it, and put it in the Stove ; turn it when it is candy'd; twice turning will do. To make Q_ NCE CLEAR- CAKES. lARE, quarter, and boil the Quince with as much Water as will cover it, putting in a little more as [491 as it boil?, but not too much ; let it be a very strong Jelly, and run it through a Jelly-bag; put a Pound and a Half of the finest sifted Sugar to a Pint of Jelly ; let the Jelly boil, then put in the Sugar, and let it scald 'till the Sugar is melted ; then put it through a Strainer, laid in a broad Earthen Pan ; fill it in little Pots, and when it is hard candy'd, turn it on Glasses as other Clear-Cakes : Colour the Jelly, if you wou'd have any Red Quince Clear-Cakes, with the Jelly of black Bullace, and let it boil after the Red is in, before you put in the Sugar. To preserve GOLDEN or KENTISH- PIPPINS. BOYL the Rind of an Orange very tender, and let it lye in Water two or three Days ; then make a strong Jelly with Pippins, and run it through a Jelly-bag. Take Golden- Pippins, pare 'em, and scoop out all the Coar at the Stalk End : To twelve H Pippins 50o Pippins put two Pound of Sugar- and three Quarters of a Pint of Water, boil the Sugar and skim it; put in the Pippins and the Orange-Rind cut into thin Slices let 'em boil as fafl as they can 'till the Sugar is very thick, and almost a Candy; then put in a Pint of the Pippin-Jelly, and boil 'em very fast 'till they jelly very well 5.then put in the Juice of a Lemmon, give it one Boil, and put 'em in Pots or Glaf- fes, with the Orange mix'd with 'em. The Kentifi Pippins are better in Quarters than whole. . $& s, ^ o, S. $4 ', p $ , C3.0»t.·; ?..-JC'.«.t)u .tn:,yr.d:2.<:'.oa. .t~eso:..0)eOC .oUi:U.U(U To preserve WHOLE ORANGES or L E M M OS. A S P 'em very thin, just the Out- fide Rind off; lay 'em in Water twenty four Hours then set 'ern on the Fire with a good Quantity of Water; let 'em boil 'till they are very tender; then put 'em in cold Water again, and let 'em lye two Days ; the Lemmons need not lye but oneDay; then, to four Oranges or Lemmons put two [ 51 ] two Pound of fine Sugar and a Pint of Water ; boil and fkirn it, and when it is cold, put in the Oranges or Lem- mons, and let 'em lye four or five Days in cold Syrup , then boil 'em 'till they are clear; set 'em by in an Earthen Pan a Day or two more ; then boil 'em again, and put 'em in Jelly, thus : Take Pippin-Jelly, and to a Pint put a Pound of fine Sugar boil it 'till the Jelly is very strong; then heat your Oranges, and put 'em to the Jelly, with half their Syrup ; boil 'em very faft'a quarter of an Hour ; when you take 'em off the Fire, put in the Juice of two or three Lemmons; put 'em in Pots that will hold the Jelly : To four Oranges you may put one Pint and a Half of Jelly, and one Pound and a Half of Sugar. Lemmons mutl be done by themselves. Sevil Oranges and Malaga Lemmons are best. H2-; H T - . \ w [ %t I To dry ORANGES in KNOTS, o LEMMONS. A SP the Oranges or Lemmons with a sharp Knife, as thin and as finall as you can, and break the Raf- ping as little as you can, that the Out- fide Rind may make but two or three Knots i then cut the Oranges, and pick out all the Meat and the white Rind makes another Sort of Knots; Let both the Rinds lye two Days in a Sieve, or broad Pan, before you boil 'em, or they will break; then put 'em in cold Water, and boil 'em about an Hour; let 'em drain well from the Water, and clarify as much single- refin'd Sugar as will cover 'em very well; when the Syrup is cold put 'em in, and let 'em stand four or five Days; dry 'em out as you use 'em; and when you take any out to dry, boil them which you leave in the Sy- rup. They must be candy'd out thus: Take as many as you desire to dry X the white Halvesmuft be cut in Rings, or Quarters, as you like 'em ; then take [ 53] take as much clarify'd Sugar as will cover 'em ; boil 'em very salt a great while, 'till the Sugar {hall blow, which you may fee, if you put in a Ladle with Holes, and blow thro', you will fee the Sugar fly from the Ladle then take it off, and rub. the Candy against the Pan Sides, and round the Bottom, 'till the Sugar looks Oily; then put'em out on a Sieve, to let the Sugar run from 'em i and as quick as pofiible lay 'em in Knots on another Sieve ; set 'em in a Stove, they will be dry in an Hour or two : If you do but a few at a Time, the Syrup you put to'em at first will do 'em out. Whole Oranges or Lemmons are done the fame Way, only boil the whole after they are rafp'd, and cut a Hole at the Top, and pick out all the Meat after they are boil'd, and before. they are put in the Syrup; and when they are laid on a Sieve to dry, put the Piece in ain, . , [ 54] To make CH IN A C H I PS. C UT the Rind of China Oranges in long Chips, but very thin,;and with none of the White ; boil 'em in Water'till they are very tender ; then drain 'em, and put 'em into a very thick cold Syrup of clarify'd Sugar ; let 'em lye a Day or two 5 then scald 'em, and when they are cold lay 'em to dry on Earthen Plates in a Stove. -Seil Oranges will do the fame Way, if you like 'em with a little Sugar, and very bitter. To make 0 RA N G E-PA s TE. RA S P the Oranges, and you irnay make the Outside for Knots; then cut the Oranges, and pick out all the Meat, and all the Stones from the Meat ; boil the white Rinds very ten- der, drain 'em well, and beat 'em fine ; to a Pint and Half of the Meat put a Pound of the beaten Rind; mix it well, make it scalding hot 5 then put in [55] in three Pound of fine Sugar sifted thro' an Hair Sieve ; stir it well in, and scald it 'till the Sugar is well melted then put in the Juice of three largeLemmons: PutthePafte in flat Earthen Pans, or deep Plates set it in the Stove'till it is candy'd then drop it on Glasses: Let what is too thin to drop stand 'till 'tis candy'd again: Once turning will dry it. Sevil Oran- ges make the best. ,O o$, , ^,,ti bu 3u,§ .uyo2.uatj P§ou.u7. t.30<U(tyyo $.u To make ORAN GE-DROPS. AKE about a Dozen Oranges, squeeze out the Juice, boil the Rind very tender, cut out most of the White, and beat the yellow Rind very fine rub it thro' an Hair Sieve, and to a Pound of the Pulp put a Pound and a Half of fine Sugar, sifted thro' an Hair Sieve ; mix it well in, and put in the Juice 'till you make it thin enough to drop from a Tea-Spoon: Drop it on Glasses, and set it by the Fire ; let it stand there about two Hours, and then put it in a Stove; the next t 56 next Day turn it: It will be dry ill twenty four Hours. To make ORANGE-MARMALET. ASP the Oranges, cut out the Meat, boil the Rinds very tender, and beat 'em very fine then take three Pound of fine Sugar and a Pint of Water, boil and skim it; then put in a Pound of Rind, boil it fast 'till the Sugar is very thick; then put in a Pint of the Meat of the Orange, (the Seeds being pick'd out) and a Pint of very strong Pippin-Jelley ; boil all to- gether very fast, 'till it jellies very well, which will be half an Hour; then put it in Potts or Glasses, with Papers close to it. ORANGE or LEMMON CLEAR- C A K E S. M A K E a very strong Pippin-Jelley; when it is run thro' a Jelly- bag, take a Quart of Jelly, and the Meat r Meat of three or four Oranges, boil 'emlntogether,. and rub it thro' a Jelly- bag again ; then take a Quarter of a Pint of Orange-Juice,' a Quarter of a Pound of fine Sugar, and let it have-a Boil; then put it into your Jelly, but first measure your Jelly; put half the Syrup of the Oranges to a Pint of Juice, and the Outside of an Orange, boil'd in two or three Waters, and shred very, fine make 'em scalding hot together; then to a Pint of Jelly take a Pound and a Half of Sugar, boiling the Sugar to a Candy; then' put in your Jelly, but not altogether , because if it all boil in the hot Sugar, it will not.dry: As soon as it has done boiling, put .in the reft set it over the Fire 'til all the Candy is well melted; but take Care. 'it does not boil then fill.it in little Pots, dry and turn it on Glasses, as other Clear- Cakes. Lemimons are done 'the sal'e Way. I eT 5 58 ] 'To make POME GR ANATECLEAR CAKES. -M AKE a trong Pippin-Jelly, and Vi¥ slice aLemmon irto it, Rind and all; boil it well, and run it thro' the Jelly-bag again ; then culour it as you like it: To a Pint of the Jelly take half a Quarter of Orange-Syrup, made as for Orange Clear-Cakes; let it have a Boil together, and boil a Pound and a Half of Sugar to a Candy; put your Jelly to the Candy a little at a Time, 'till the Sugar has done:boiling, then put in all the reft . scald it 'till the Candy is well melted, fill it in Pots, and dry it as other Clear-Cakes. The Colour is made 'thus: Take .as much Carmine as you can have for Half-a-Crown, put to it two Ounces of Sugar, and as much Water as will wet it; give it a Boil, and then-colour your Jelly with it. To [ 59 ] To make ORANGE-HALVES, or QU A R T E R S, with the Meat in them. A S P the Oranges round and thin, cut 'em in Halves, pick out the Meat, boil the Halves very tender, then take half of 'em, that are cleaeft and bess, and put 'em in a thick cold Syrup, as -much as will cover 'em ; the Syrup must be made with fine Sugar, halfa Pint of Water to a Pound of Sugar.; beat-the other Half of the Rinds very fine; pick the Seeds out of the Meat'; and to a Pint of the Mea't put half a Pound of the beaten Rinds scald it very well, and. stir into it a Pound and a Half of'fifted Sugar; scald it 'tilli the Sugar is well melted; put in thei Juice of a Lemmon or two set it in a broad Earthen Pan in a Stove ; when the Half Orange-Rinds have lain'three or four Days in the Syiup, boil 'em very fafi 'till they are clea, 'and the Syrup very thick' when: th'e' are- cold, lay 'em out on Elarthen sPlatesln a Stove ', -the, next Day, if you think they have not Sugar I 2 enough [ 6o ] eacugh on'em, dip 'em in the Syrup that runs from 'em; they must not have dry Sugar on 'em,, but only a Gloss; before they are quite dry, fill 'em with the Meat. set'em pn a Sieve, to dry in a Stove, which will be in g Day or two. To preserve CITRONS. -'T AKE the largest Malaga Ci- T1 trons, cut 'em in four Quartets, scrape the Rind a little, but not all the Yellow off; cut out all the Meat; lay 'er in Water all Night; then boil 'em very tender, and lay Tem in Water another Night; then drait 'em very well, and to three Poun4 of. Citron take four Poqnd' of fme Sugar and two, Quarts of Water 'i make the Sugar and Water -just warim, put in the Citron, boil it halfanlHohi and set it by'til the extD.y;then09# it:t iil it is-very clea., :ad put in.-ra Pound more-of Sugar, justet w.fl Water, boiling it fast 'ti tqs mgtl4i. ')7 . . 7 .i [ 6i ] Put in the Juice of four Lemmons, and put it up in large Pots. To make CITRON MARMALET. O I L the Citron very tender, cut off all the yellow Rind, beat the White very well in a Tray,- or wooden Bowl, flred the Rind, and to a Pound of the Pulp and Rind take a Pound and a Half of Sugar and half a Pint of Water ; when it ,boils, put in the Citron, boil it very fast till it is clear; then put in half a Pint of Pippin- Jelly, and boil it till it jellies very well; then put in the Juice of a Lem- anon: Put it in Pots or Glasses. To candy 0 RA N G E-FL O WE RS. rTAKE; the Flowers full blow'n, Ti pick the white Leaves, and put 'em in Wateran Hour or two, then 'p 'em into boiling Water, letting 'em boi 'till they are tender; then drain 'em [ 6Z 3 'em from that Water, and let 'em lye in cold Water, 'till you make a Syrup of very fine Sugar, as much as you think will cover 'em ; to a Pound. of Sugar put three Quarters of a Pint of Water;: and when the. Syrop: is cold, put in the Leaves, .ahd let 'em lye allNight scald 'em tfli next Day', and let 'em lye in the Syrup two or three Days; then 'makea Syrup, 'if you have a Pound oft the Flowers) with a Poufid and Half of! fine Sugar and half a int of Watse ' boil and idm it, and, ..it is cold, drain' the Flowers from the-thin Syrup, and put 'em in the Thick ; let 'em lye two or three Days; then make 'em just hot, and in a. Day or two more- 'lay 'em out on Glasses: Spread 'em very thin, sift 'em with fine Sugar, and put 'em in- a Stove : Four or-'five Hours will dry 'em on one Side; then scrape'em on Paper with.the wet Side ippermbft, and set 'em in the Stove 'till they are .anmoft dry ; -.then pick' 'e'h afun'4eir, and let 'em be in a Stove .till they Ire quite dry : You may putfome of ire a J.eltly, if you like it.ii' '; i, To [ 63 To make ROCK-SUGAR. T A KE a red Earthen Pot, that T will hold about four Quarts, (those Pots that are something less at the Top and Bottom than in the Middle) s-ick it pretty thick with the Sticks of a white Whisk, a-cross, one over the other; set it before a good Fire, that it may be very hot against your Sugar is boil'd ; then take ten Pound of double-refin'd Sugar finely beaten, the Whites of two Eggs beaten to a Froth in half a Pint of Water, and mix it with the Sugar then put to it a Quart of Orange'flower-water and three half Pints of Water,fetting it on a quick Fire ; when it boils thoroughly put in half a Pint of Water more to raise the Scum, and letitboil up again; then take it off and skim it do so two or three Times, 'till it is very clear; then let it boil, 'till you find it draw between: your Fingers, which you must often try, with taking a little in the Ladle ; and as it cools, it will draw like a Thread ; then put it into the hot Pot, covering it close, and set- [ 64 ] setting it in a very hot Stove for three Days: It muftl sand three Weeks but after the three first Days a moderate Fire will do; but never fir the Pots, nor let the Stove be quite-cold : Then take it out, and pour out all the Sy- rup, the Rock will be on the Sticks and the Pot-fides: Set the Pots in cold Water, in a Pan, on the Fire, and when it is thorough hot all the Rock will flip out, and fall most of it in fnall Pieces the Sticks you must just dip in hot Water, and that will make the Rock flip off then put h a. good Handful of dry Orange-Flowers, -and take a Ladle with Holes, and put te Rock and Flowers in it, as much as will make as biga Lump as you wou'd like; dip it in scalding Water, and lay it on aTin Plate; then make it up in handsome Lumps, and as hollow as you can: When it. is so far prepar'd, put it in a hot Stove, and the next Day it will sick together ; then take it off the Plates, and let it lye two or three Hours in the Stove; if there, be any large Pieces, you may make Bottoms of 'em, and lay fmll ·Pieces-o'n 'em. TI [ 65 To make FRUIT-B I SCUIT. C A LD the Fruit, dry it well from the Water, and rub it through a Hair Sieve ; stir it in a Pan over a flow Fire, 'till it is pretty dry; the stiffer it is, the better ; then take two Pound of fine Sugar, sifted thro' an Hair Sieve, and a Spoonful of Gum- Dragon fteept very well, and ftrain'd, and about a Quarter of a Pound of Fruit; mix it well with Sugar, beat it with a Bifcuit-beater, and take the Whites of 12 Eggs, beat up to a very stiff Froth; put in but a little at a Time, beating it 'till it is all in, and looks as white as Snow, and very thick ; then drop it on Papers, and put it in an Oven ; the Oven inuft be very cool, and shut up, to make 'em rife: The Lemmon-Bifcuit is made the fame Way, only instead of Fruit put in the Juice of three Lemmons ; less will make two Pound ; it inuft have Juice enough to make it to a Paste, and the Rinds of two Lemmons gra- ted ; and when it is beaten enough, K put [ 66 ] put in a little Musk, or Amber, and drop and bake it as other. Raic AiA ,tcS^I8AISQótc c keeiS8es a S(A1i Qe{ ss"o To make a£ Sorts of S U G A R-PA S T E. SIFT your Sugar thro' a Lawn Sieve,then sift some Starch as fine ; to a Pound of Sugar put a Quarter of a Pound of Starch ; make it of what Colour you please, into a stiff Paste; putting thereto Gum -Dragon well fteept in Orange-Flower-Water ; beat it well in a Mortar, and make it in Knots or Shells in a Mould or Moss, with rubbing it thro' an Hair Sieve: The Red must be colour'd with Car- mine : the Yellow with Gumboodge, fieept in Water, and put to the Gum; the Green is made with Yellow Gum putting to it Stone-Blue fteept in Wa- ter ; the brown with Chocolate,and the Blue with Smalt. To [67 ] To make CHOCOLATE ALMONDS. T AKE two Pound of fine sifted T Sugar, half a Pound of Choco- late grated, and sifted thro' an Hair Sieve, a Grain of Musk, a Grain of Amber, and two Spoonfuls of Ben; make this up to a stiff Paste with Gum- Dragon fteept well in Orange-Flower- Water ; beat it well in a Mortar ; make it in a Mould like Almonds; lay 'em to dry on Papers, but not in a Stove. To make Wo M w O O D-CA K E S. IFT fine Sugar thro' an Hair Sieve, and cover it with Carmine wet it more than a Candy with Water; boil it pretty fa ft'till it is almost at a Candy Height; then put in about three Drops of Spirit of Wormwood, and fill it into little Coffins made of Cards ; when it boils in the Coffins it is enough; you must not boil above half a Pound at a Time, or less: The K 2 Spirit [ 6? Spirit of Wormwood muff be that which looks black, and as thick as Oil, and muff have two or three Boils in the Cakes after you put it in. To make HONYCOMB-CAKES of 0 .A N G E-FL OWE R-VI L E T of Co SLIPS. AKE about half a Pound of fine Sugar, sifted thro' an Hair Sieve, wet it nore than for a Candy, with Orange-Flower-Water, for the Orange-Flower-Cakes, and fair Water for the other Cakes ; boil it almost to Candy Height, and then put in the Leaves of the Flowers ; boil 'em a little in the Candy, or it will be too thin ; then put it in Card-Coffins. To make ICE ALMON D-CAK E S BEAT a Pound of Almonds very fine, with Rose-Water, to keep 'em from Oiling mix 'em with half a Pound [69] Pound of sifted Sugar, make 'em up into little long or round Cakes, which you like befft put 'em in a Stove or before a Fire, 'till they are dry on one Side, and then turn'em ; and when they are dry on both Sides, take very fine Sugar sifted ; to a Pound take as much White of Eggs as will just wet it ; beat it with a Spoon, and as it grows white put in a little more Egg, 'till it is thin enough to ice the Cakes ; then ice first one Side, and when that is dry before the Fire, ice the other: Be sure one Side is dry before you do the other. To make BEAN'D-BREAD. BLANCH half a Pound of Al- monds, slice 'em thin the long Way, lay 'em in Rose-Water all Night ; then drain 'em from the Wa- ter, and set 'em by the Fire, stirring 'em 'till they are a little dry and very hot; then put to 'em fine Sugar sifted, enough to hang about 'em. (They must not be so wet as to make the Su- gar [ 70 ] gar like Paste ; nor so dry, but that the Sugar may hang together.) Then lay 'em in Lumps on Wafer-Paper, and set 'em on Papers in an Oven, after Puffs, or any very cool Oven that Pies have been baked in. To make ORANGE or LEMMON- P F F S. T AKE a Pound of fine sifted Sugar, and grate the Outside Rind of two large Oranges or Lem- mons; put the Rind to the Sugar, and beat 'em well together in a Mor- tar; grind it well with a Pestle, and make it up to a stiff Paste with Gum- Dragon well fReept; then beat the Paste again, rowI or square it, and bake it in a cool Oven, on Papers and Tin- Plates. To [7'] To make A L M O N D-PA S T E, either BITTERO. S W E E T: The BIT- TE R are RATAFEA. LANCH and beat a Pound of Almonds ; put in just Rose-Water enough to keep 'em from Oiling; then take a Pound of fine Sugar, and boil it to a Candy ; and when it is almost at a Candy Height, put in the Almonds; stir 'em over a cool Fire 'till it is a very dry stiff Paste, and almost cold, and set it by 'till it is quite cold then beat it well in a Mortar, and put to it a Pound and a Half of fine sifted Sugar ; rub it very well together, and make it up with a Spoonful of well- fleept Gum-Dragon and Whites of Eggs, whipt to a Froth ; then squirt it, and bake it in a cool Oven ; put in- to the Sweet-Almonds the Rind of a Lemmon grated, but none in the Bit- ter: If you don't ffake the first Paste stiff, they will run about the Oven. Bake 'em on Papers and Tin-Plates. To [72] Tomake LITTLE ROUND RATAFEA- PUFFS. AKE half a Pound of Kernels, or Bitter-Almonds, beat very fliff, and a Pound and a Half of sift- ed Sugar ; make it up to a stiff Paste with White of Eggs whipt to a Froth; beat it well in a Mortar, and make it up in little Loaves; then bake 'em in a very cool Oven, on Paper and Tin- Plates. ^<^^(*^("^i*^^y< -- *v**^^^ To make B K O W N-W A F E . S. T AKE half a Pint of Milk and half a Pint of Cream, and put to it half a Pound of brown Sugar melt and strain it thro' a Sieve; take as much fine Flower as will make one half of the Milk and Cream very stiff, then put in the other Half stir it all the while, that it may not be in Lumps; then put in two Eggs well beaten, a little Sack, some Mace shred fine, [73] fine, two or three Cloves beaten: Bake in Irons. To make ALMO N D-LOAVES. B E AT a Pound of Almonds very fine, mix 'em well with three Quarters of a Pound of lifted Sugar, set'em over the Fire, keep 'em stirring 'till they are stiff, and put in the Rind of a Lemmon grated ; make 'em up in little Loaves, ihake 'em very well in the Whites of Eggs beat to a very stiff Froth, that the Egg may hang about 'em ; then put 'em in a Pan with about a Pound of fine sifted Sugar, shake 'em 'till they are well cover'd with the Sugar ; divide 'em if they flick together, and add more Sugar, 'till they begin to be smooth, and dry; and when you put 'em on Pa- pers to bake, hake 'em in a Pan that is just wet with White of Eggs, to make 'em have a Gloss: Bake 'em after Biscuit, on Papers and Tin-Plates. L To [ 74 3 To make CHOCOLATE-PUF FS AKE a Pound of fine sifted Su- Tgar, and three Ounces of Cho- colate grated, and sifted thro' an Hair Sieve; make it up to a Paste with White of Eggs whipt to a Froth; then beat it well in a Mortar, and make it up in Loaves, or any Faihion you please. Bake it in a cool Oven, on Papers and Tin-Plates. To make R A T A F E A-D O P S, either of APRICOCK-KERNELS, or half BITTER, and half SWEET- ALMONDS. AKE a Pound of Kernels or Almonds beat very fine with Rose-Water take a Pound of sifted Sugar and the Whites of five Eggs beat to a Froth, mix 'em well together, and set 'em on a flow Fire; keep them firring 'till they begin to be sriss; when they are quite cold, make 'em in little round Drops: Bake 'em after the [ 75 ] the long Biscuit, on Paper and Tin- Plates, To make all Sorts of SUGAR-PUFFS. T AKE very fine beaten Sugar, sifted thro'a Lawn Sieve, make it up into a Paste, with Gum-Dragon very well fteep'd in Rose-Water, or Orange-Flower-Water ) beat it in a Mortar, squirt it, and bake it in a cool Oven. Colour the Red with Carmine, Blue with Powder - Blue, Yellow with fteep'd Gamboodge put into Gum, and Yellow and Blue will make Green: Bake 'em after all other Puffs. Sugar the Papers well before you squirt the Puffs on Papers and Tin-Plates. To make A L M o N D-PA S T E. AY a Pound of Almonds all Night in Water, and warm some Water the next Day to make 'em blarnch, L mana [76] and then beat 'em very fine with Rose- Water; and to a Pound of Almonds take a Pound and a Quarter of fine Sugar; wet it with Water, boil it to a Candy Height, and then put to your Almonds three Spoonfuls of Rose-Water, mix it, and put it to the Candy set it over the Fire 'till it is scalding hot, then put in the Juice of a Lemmon and the Rind grated stir it over the Fire, and then drop it on Glass or clean Boards: Put it in a hot Stove twelve Hours will dry it ; then turn it, and dry it the other Side. To make LoNG BISCUIT. T A K E thirty Eggs, (the Whites of fourteen) break twenty eight of 'em; beat 'em very well with two Spoonfuls of Rose-Water 5 then put in three Pound of sifted Sugar, and beat it all the while the Oven is heat- ing ; then dry two Pound and a Quar- of fine Flower, let it be cold before you put it in, and put in the two Eggs [ 77 ] Eggs left out; stir it well, and drop it. It muff have a very quick Oven. Bake it almost as fast as you can fill your Oven; the Papers muff be laid on Tin-Plates, or they will burn at the Bottom. This fame Biscuit was the Queen's Seed-Bifcuit. Put to half this Quantity halfa Pound of Caraway- Seeds, and bake it in large square Tin- Pans, buttering the Pans; It bakes best in a cool Oven, after the Drop- Biscuit is baked, To make SPUNGE-BISCUIT. T' AKE the Yolks of eighteen Eggs, beat 'em well, the Whites of nine whipt to a Froth, and beat 'em well together ; put to 'em two Pound and two Ounces of sifted Sugar, and have ready half a Pint of Water, with three Spoonfuls of Rose-Water, boil- ing hot and as you beat the Eggs and Sugar, put in the hot Water,a little at a Time ; then set the Biscuit over the Fire, (it muff be beat in a Brass or Silver Pan) keeping it beating,'till it is so [78 ] so hot that you can't hold your Finger in it 5 then take it off, and beat it 'till 'tis almost cold; then put in a Pound and Half of Flower well dry'd, and the Rind of two Lemmons grated. Bake it in little long Pans butter'd, and in a quick Oven: Sift Sugar over 'em before you put 'em in the Oven. To make round BISCUIT with CORI- ANDER-SEEDS. T 'AKE nine Eggs, and but four of the Whites, beat 'em very well, put to 'em eight Spoonfuls of Rose-Water, and eight of Orange- Flower-Water; beat the Eggs and Water a Quarter of an Hour; then put in a Pound of sifted Sugar, three Quarters of a Pound of fine Flower well dry'd, beat this all together an Hour and Half; then put in two Ounces of Coriander-Seeds a little bruis'd: When the Oven is ready, put 'em in little round Tin-Pans but- ter'd, and sift Sugar over 'em, A cool Oven will bake 'em. To [79 To nake HARTSHOR N-J E L L. AKE half a Pound of Hartf- horn, boil it in a Pipkin, with fix Quarts of Spring-Water, 'till con- fum'd to three Pints ; let it sand all Night; then put to it half a Pound of fine Sugar, some Cinamon, Mace, and a Clove or two, and let it boil again; then put in the Whites of eight Eggs well beaten, letting it boil up again ; then put in the Juice of four or five Lemmons, and half a Pint. of Rhenifb Wine; let it just boil up, and then run it thro' a Jelly-bag 'till it is clear. To make L E M M O N-J E L L Y. A KE four Lemmons, rasp the Rinds into a Pint and half of Spring-Water, let it lye an Hour; and then put to it the Whites of five Eggs well beaten, half a Pound of Sugar, and the Juice of four Lemmons ; when the Sugar is melted, strain it thro' a thin Sieve or Strainer; then take [ 80 ] take a little Powder of Turmerick, ty'd up in a Piece of Muflin,and lay it in a Spoonful of Water 'till it is wet then squeeze a little into the Jelly, to make it Lemmon-Colour, but not too Yellow: Set it over the Fire, ikim it, and when you fee it jelly, put it in Glasses 5 if it boil, it will not be amiss. To make BUTTER'D-ORANGE. AS P the Peel of two Oranges in- to half a Pint of Water ; put to it half a Pint of Orange-Juice, and fix Eggs, (but two of the Whites) and as much Sugar as will sweeten it; firain it, set it on the Fire, and, when it is thick, put in a Piece of Butter as big as a Nut, keeping it stirring 'till it is cold. To make E RING o-C R EAM. T A KE a Quartern of Eringo's, cut 'em finall, and boil 'em in half a Pint of Milk, 'till they are tender; then t.ihen iut4'.q em'a Pint of Cream,- and two Eggs we, l beateen fietit on the Fire, and let it just boil , if you don't hiank itf-wetnpug-h put in a -little Sugar. r PI. I. , AA , A. To Jntke B A R L EY-C:R E A M. 'T 4 K E two Ou.ees of Pearl-Bar- J, ley,'y bpil it in four or five Wa- ters till it is very tendero : then ub it thro' an Hair Sievve, and put it to a Pint of Creams, ith an Egg well bea- ten ; fWeete[ it, and let it boil Js y.ou please, ypu may leave some of tlhe Bafley .wheple in it. o ake R A T A F E A-C REAM. T A I E Kernels of Apricocks, beat ,- ,,en, very fine,, and to twp Oun- ces pi sint of ream and two Eggs; ,eyW qte3jtr:et it pn the F.e, aTnd ,et b 4i- i.[.' ~pretty thick: You may ;~. ' M!: ; :}!!,. 'l '[ g] slice some of the Kernels thin, and put 'em in, besides what is beaten.: To make ALMOND-BUTTER. T AKE half a Pound of Almonds finely 'beaten, :mix, , em in a Quart of Cream; strain the Cream, an'd get out ,as much of the :Almonds as you can thro& the Strainset: .set. it on the Fire, arid when it is ready to boil,; put in twelve Eggs :(bu't three of the Whites) well beatenr; stir 'it on the Fire 'till- it turns- to' a Curd; then put in half.a Pint of';'61d;Milk, stir it well, and whey it in a .Strainer: When 'tis cold sweeten it. To make a TRI FLE, -T AKE :Pint of. Creamn, and toil '-it, an'd wheh-'it ,i§'aifi/t° cold, Xfreeen. :it; '*' a iiaut' ir'.ipitYWe3Bifoh :yo uiafe:it:ihriin'd!'putt tUita':Spb'oifiUl -osf'Runnet ; let'it sand 'till it comes like [ 83 ] like Cheese ::You may perfume it, or put in-O'rainge-Flower-Water. Q99SfflQ;999Ea9QQ999fi9 g9g A99;99QQgQ99a99 To make all Sorts ofFRUIT-CREAM. T" AKE your Fruit, (scalded) or . Sweetmeats, and rub it thro' an Hair Sieve, and boil your Cream; a'nd when'tis cold, put in your Fruit,. 'till 'tis pretty thick. To make S AC K-PO S: E T, or S A K, C EA M. AKE twelve Eggs, (the Whites of but fix) beat 'em, and put to 'em a Pint of Sack and half a Pound of Sugar i set 'em on a Fire, keeping 'eml stirring 'till they turn white,.afnd just begin to thick i at ,the, fame Time on another Fire have a Quart of, Cream, boil' and pour it into the, EggSand Sack, give it a Stir round, and cover it a Quarter of an OUEr, before you eat it: The Eggs and Sack i., : M 2 mulft [. 41 must bee heated in the BPkfon.oii use it in, and the Cream ufl; boil 'before you set on the Eggs. To make B L M A N G E., AK E two Ounces of lsing-glats, T steep it all- ight'in Rose-Water then take it out of the Water and' put to it a Quart of Milk, and about fix Laurel Leaves, breaking the Leaves into two or three Pieces- boil:this 'till all the Ifing-glafs is diffolv'd, and the Milk diminifi'd to ieft thah a Pinti then put to it a Quart of Cream, let- ting it boil about half an Ho.ur i then ftraih it thro' a thin Strainet,. lIavifi as little of the Ifing-glafS- in the Strainer as you. can ; sweeten it, and, if you 'like it, put in a' lttie Oratge- Flower-Water; put it in a broad Eal- then Pan, or hida. Dihi ' the nett Day, when you use it, eut it with . Jagging-Iron 'iit long Slips, and lIy it, in Knots on the Diui or Plate -you ferM it up. in. LE M [g5] L E M M O -C - E A K mw de wi i C R EA M. . A K E a Pint of Cream, the Yotks .J. of twq Eggs, and about a.Qua^t, ter of a Pound of Sugar, boil'd: with the Rind of a Lemrnon- cut very thin; when. it is almost cold, take oUt the Rind, and put in the Juice of a; large Lemmonr by Degrees, or it will turni keeping it firring 'till it is quite cold. To nase- C . T .O N-C Rt A M. AKE half a Pound of Green Citron, cut it as thin as possible, ad iih fmnall long Pieces, but'no lo.ger than half an Inch: Put it in a Pint ob Cream, with. a Piece of the Rind of a Lemmon, and boil it a Quarter of an Hour:; then sweeten it, put in an Egg well beaten, and set it on the Fire again, 'till it grows thick; then put in the luice of half: a Lemmon, and.fith itt tils cold. . ~t' [i. 86 To make PiSTAT o-C K EAM. AKE half a Pound of Piftato- Nuts, break 'em, and blan'h the Kernels, and beat all (except a Dozen, that you mufl: keep to slice, to lay on the Top of the Cream) with a little Milk ; then put 'em into a Pint of Cream, with the Yolks of two Eggs, and sweeten it with fine Sugar: To this Quantity put a Spoonful :of the Juice of Spinage, ftamp'd and ftrain'd; set it all over the Fire, and let it just boil ; and when you fend it up, put the flic'd Kernels on the Top. If you like it thick, you may put in the White of one Egg. To make C LOUT E D-C REAM. AKE four Gallons of Milk, 'let it just boil up i :then put.in tWO Quarts of Cream,- and when it begiis' to boil again, put it in two large Pans or Trays, letting it fland three Days-': t.en take it from the Milk with a Skimmer " " 'Skimmer full of Holes, and lay it in thie Dish you fend it up in: Lay it high in the Middle, and a large ha'ndsome Piece on the Top, to cover all'the reft. To make a very thick, raw, C R E A M. T A KE two Trays, keep 'em boil- :- ing hot and, when you bring your Milk, put it in the fcalding-hot Ttay,' and cove''it with the other hot Tiay ; and the next Day you will find a very thick' Cream. This muff be done the Night before you use it. 'o' 1 ' .' I , I' ' t " : .1 ; ' K - 1: '' -' Omake S P A N ISH-B U tT'TE R.. ,', . . . .... . "' AKE two Gallons of Milk, boiI ':1, it, and, whilfi b0oig,^put'in a Quait of Cream let it 'boil after the Creain is 'ini; fet'it in twd .broad Pans or Tray,' and le's it stand 'two' or -three Days; then take the Cream from the -I¥ilk into a Silver Pan or wooden Bowl, put to it a Spoonful of Orange-Flower- Water, Water, with a perfum'4 Pastel or two' imelted in it and sweeten it a little with fifted-.Sugar: Then beat it with a Silver Ladle or a wopden Beater, 'till it is siss enough to lye as high as you .wao'4 have it; Be fte to. beatt ;i all one Way, and not change your Hand. To make Q0A N GEB-I TT E i. T AK E the Ripd4 f two or three Orangep, and boil 'em very ten- der ; then beat 'em very fieiiq a Moar, and rub 'em thro' an Hair Sieve ; thep take a Quart of Cream, boil it, and .put in the Yolks of ten. Eggs,,n.nd the Whites of two; beat the Eg-gs very well before yop put 'etn q the boiling Cream'; fir if all one Way, .'till it ia Curd.i then whey li..p.,a 'Strainer ,i whel I i s cold, mix ia as Wiuc.h of the Orange'as you thhk ' i1 .make it taife a.s you wou,'d haie.i' then fweeern- it as you like it. . ^ . * * '** .* . j- ([ i : * '- .. * * , . . . . '* ^ [89] 'To make A L M o N D-B U T T E'.. A AKE a Pint of Milk, and about T twelve large Laurel Leaves, break the Leaves in three or four Pieces; boil 'em in the Milk 'till it is half wafted; then put in a Quart of Cream, boil it with the Leaves and Milk ; then Itrain it, and set it on the Fire again when it boils, put in the Yolks of twelve Eggs, and the Whites of three, beating the Eggs very well; flir this 'till it is a Curd ; put in about Half a Pint;of Milk, let it have a Boil, then whey it in a Strainer. When it is cold, sweeten it. This taftes as well as that which has Almonds in it. To make TR o UT-CR E A M. AVE three or four long Baskets made like a Fish; then take a Quart of new Milk and a Pint of Cream, sweeten it, and put in a little Qrange-Flower-Water , make it as warm as Milk from the Cow S put in N a [90] a Spoonful of Runnet, stir it, and co- ver it close and when it comes like a Cheese, wet the Baskets, and set 'em hollow ; lay the Cheese into 'em without breaking the Curd ; as it wheys and finks, fill 'em up 'till all is in. When you fend it up, turn the Baskets on the Plates, and give it a Knock with your Hand, they will come out like a Fish: Whip Cream and lay about 'em. They will look well in any little Basket that is {hallow, if you have no long ones. To make A L M O N D-CREAM. T KAKE a Quarter of a Pound of .T Almonds, blanch and beat 'em very fine, put 'em to a Pint of Cream, boil. the Almonds and Cream, then sweeten it, and put in the Whites of two Eggs well-beaten; set it on the Fire 'till it just boils and grows thick. i - -. To. : . . [ 9 ] To make RAW-A L M N D, or RA- TA F EA-CREAM. T AKE a Quarter of a Pound of bitter or sweet Almonds, which you like best, blanch and beat 'em very fine, mix 'em with a Quart of Cream and the Juice of three or four Lemmons ; sweeten it as you like it, and whip it in a Tray with a Whitk; as the Froth rifes, put it in a Hair Sieve to grow fliff; then fill your Ba- son or Glasses. :To make C H OCOLATE-CREAM. T A KE a Quarter of a Pound of Chocolate, breaking it into a Quarter of a Pint of boiling Water mill it and boil it, 'till all the Choco- late is diffolv'd ; then put to it a Pint of Cream and two Eggs well-beaten; let it boil, milling it all the while; when it is cold, mill it again, that it may go up with a Froth, N2 To [ 92 } To make ,S E G o-C R t AM. T' AKE two Spoonfuls of Sego, boil it in two Waters,' iraining the Water from it; then put to it half a Pint of Milk, boil it'till 'tis very tender, and the Milk wafted then put to it a Pint of Cream, a Blade of Mace, a little Piece of Lemmon-Peel, and two Eggs, (the White of but one) sweeten and boil it 'till it is thick. To ice C R EA M. A K E Tin Ice-Pots, fill 'em with .any Sort of Creamyou-like, ei- theF plain or fweeten'd, pr Fruit in itt shut your Pots very close s to fix Pots you must allow eighteen :or twenty Pound of Ice, breaking .th: ce very- small; there will be some gre.at Pieces which lay at the Bottom and Toy: Yoi must have a Pai,adlay 'foieStraw-ati the Bottom ; ther lay in. you Irce ans put in amongff' t' a 'Pound 'ot B'ay- Salt , set in your Pots of Cream, and :- . lay t93 ] lay Ice anrd- Salt between every Pot, that they may not touch , but the Ice muftlye round 'em on every Sidei lay a good deal of Ice on the Top, co- verthe Pail with Straw, set it in a Cellar where no Sun or Light conmes it will be froze in four Hours, but it may stand longer; then .take it out just as you use it; hold it in your Hand and it will flip out. When you wou'd freeze any Sort of Fruit, either Cherries, Rafberries, Currants, or Strawberries, fill your Tin-Pots with the Fruit, but as hollow as you ca.n; put to 'em Lemmon , ade, made with Spring-Water and Lemmonn-Juice fwiee- ten 4'i put enough in the Pots to make thieFruit hang together, and put'emn n Ice as you. do Cream. TS.o make HARTS,; -SLU.MMER Y. ',.A'g' 0,,a Pound..of Hartzf :,.1 'hlorn, boil it in fouriQarts of ater 'tilll it comes to one, or leas,. tIt .'t. fland,-all,' Night i .then bea t'ai blianch 'ai ,ar.'er of: a,'Poond f 'Al- monds, ' * .'. -~~~~) 94 1 monds, melt the Jelly, mix the Al, monds with it, and strain it thro' a thin Strainer or Hair Sieve ; then put in a Quarter of a Pint of Cream, a little Cinamon, and a Blade of Mace, boil these together, and sweeten it: Put it into China Cups 5 when you use it, turn it out of the Cups, and eat it with Cream. To m.'ke perfun'd PA S T E L S. T AKE a Pound of Sugar sifted thro' a Lawn Sieve, two Grains of Amber-Greafe, one Grain of Muitk grind the Amber and Musk very fine, mix it with the Sugar, make it up to a Pafle with Gum-Dragon well fteep'd in Orange-Flower-Water, and put in a Spoonful of Ben; beat the Paste well in a Mortar, then r11 it pretty thin, cut the Pastels witb. a.. small Thim- .ble, and.print'em with a.Seal; let 'im lye on Papers to dry , whein'they are dry, put 'em in .a Glass that 'has a Cover, or in some close Place, wherc they may not lose their Scent. To 95 ] To burn ALMONDS. T AKE a Pound of Jordan-Al- monds, set 'em before a hot Fire, or in an Oven, 'till they are very crisp then take three Quarters of a Pound of Sugar, one Ounce of Chocolate grated, and a Quarter of a Pint of Water,and boil these almost to a Candy; then put in the Almonds, and let'em be jut hot ; take'em off and flir'em, 'till the Sugar grows dry, and hangs about the Almonds: Put 'em out of the Pan on a Paper, and put 'em 'asunder. To make L E M M O N -WA F E R S. A K E fine sifted Sugar, and put it in Spoons, colouring it in every Spoon of several Colours ; wet -4iwith Juice of Lemmon; this is to paint the Wafers. Cut little square Papers, of very thick but very fine Paper, (a Sheet will make two Dozen) then [ 96 ] then take a Spoonful of Sugar, wet it with Juice of Leinmon, let it be pretty stiff, hold the Spoon over the Fire 'till it grows thin, and is .just scalding hot' then put a.Tea-Spoon- ful on the Paper, rubbing it equally all over the Paper very thin; then paintit of what Colour you please, sirss scald- ing the Colours: When, you fee'it grows dry, pin it at two Corners of the Paper; when they are cold, and you have made all you design to mace, put em' into a Box, and set 'em a Day or two by. the Fire; then wet the Papers, with your Fingers dipt into Water, on the Outside ; let -em lye a little, and the Papers will come off. The Colours are made thus: The Red with Carmine, the Blue with Smalt, the Green with Powder, call'd Green-Earth; and the Yellow with Saffron fteep'd in Lemmon-Juice. . '~. ~TO [97] To candy. little GRE E N-O R A N E S. AY the Oranges in Water three Days, histing 'em every Day; then put 'em into scalding Water, keeping 'em in a Scald, close cover'd, 'till they are green ; then boil 'em 'till they are tender, and put 'em in Water for 'three Days more, shifting the Water every Day: Make a Syrup with their Weight in Sugar, Half a Pint of Water to a Pound of Sugar , when the Syrup is ,cold put the Oran- ges into it; let 'em lye two or three Days, and then candy them out as other Orahges. To candy Cow s L i PS, or any FLOw- ERS or GREENS in Bunches. STEEP Gum-Arabick in Water, wet the Flowers with it, and shake 'em in a Cloth, that they may be dry; then dip 'em in fine sifted. Sugar, and hang 'em on a String,'ty'd cross a Chimney that has a Fire in it: O The) They must hang two or three Days, 'till the Flowers are quite dry;'. To make CARAMEL. A K E China Oranges, peel and- split 'em into Quarters; but don't break theSSkin , lay the Quarters be- fore a Fire, turning 'em 'till the Skin is. very dry; then take Half a Pound of Sugar sifted thrp' an Hair Sieve, put it in a Brass or Silver Pan,. and set it over a very flow Fire, keeping it stir- ring 'till all is melted, and looks pret- ty clear ; then take it off the Fire, and put in your Orange-Quarters, one at a Time ; take 'em out again as raft as you can with a little Spoon, and lay 'em on a Dish, that thou'd be butter'd, or they will not come off: The Sugar will-keep, hot enough to do any Plate fall. You may do roasted Chefs- lnts, or any Fruit in the Summer, fitft laying the Fruit before a Fire, or in a, Stove, to make the Skin tough , for if any' :IYe. comeout, the Sugar will ,'.'-,:: -~ 'not * _ -' i' [ 991] rnot flick to it: It muff be done just when you use it, for it will not keep. To mnake a good. GRE E N. LAY an Ounce of Gumboodge in Water 'till it is all melted, Half a Quarter of a Pint of Water is sufficient; then take an Ounce and Half of Stone- Blue diffolv'd in a little Water, put it to the Gumboodge when melted; put 'to it a Quarter of a Pound of fine Sugar, and a Quarter of a Pint of Water more, and let it boil: Put a Spoonful of this to a Pint of any white Clear-Cakes, it will make 'em a very good Green. To figar all Sorts of finalnl F RU I T. E EAT the White'bfan Egg, and dip the Fruit in it; let it lye on a Cloth that it may not wet; then take fine- sifted Sugar, and rowl the Fruit in it 'till 'tis quite cover'd with Sugar j [- 1ioo Sugiar lay it on a Sieve in a Stov, or before a Fire, to dry it well; ,-t will keep well a Week. To scald all Sorts of FRUrIT. U T the Fruit into scalding Wa- P ter, (as much as will alnoft cd.vet the Fruit>4et it over a flow Fire, keep 'em in a Scald 'till.. they are tender, bturning the: Frit .where 'the Water does not cover-it; when 'tis very ten- der, lay a Paper close to.it, and let it fiand-'till it i.s cold : Then to a Pound of Fruit pu.t .als a .,ound of Sugar -nd let it. b6il (but not. too fast) till it looks clear : All Fruit'miuft be. donó whole but Pippins, and thfiey are best halv'd or quarter'd, and a littleOrange- Peel boil'd and put in 'em, with 'the Juice of-aLemmon.. . , -. .