Full Citation

  • Title The housekeeper's valuable present: or, lady's closet companion. Being a new and complete art of preparing confects, according to modern practice. Comprized under the following Parts; viz. I. Different Methods and Degrees of boiling and clarifying Sugar. II. Methods of preserving various Fruits in Syrups, &c. III. Methods of making Marmalades, Jams, Pastes, &c. IV. Methods of making Syrups, Custards, Jellies, Blanch-Mange, Conserves, Syllabubs, &c. V. Methods of preserving various Fruits in Brandy. VI. Methods of making a Variety of Biscuits, rich Cakes, &c. &c. Vii. Methods of mixing, freezing, and working Ice Creams. Viii. Methods of preparing Cordials and made Wines. With a Variety of other useful and elegant Articles. By Robert Abbot, Late Apprentice to Messrs. Negri & Gunter, Confectioners, in Berkeley Square
  • Author Abbot, Robert
  • Imprint [London] : Printed for the author; and sold by C. Cooke, no. 17, Pater-Noster Row; and all other booksellers in town and country, [1790?].
  • Collection Science, Technology, and Medicine I
  • Pages 99
  • Language English
  • Document Type Monograph
  • Microfilm Reel # 8848
  • ESTC Number T202352
  • Physical Description 100p. ; 12°
  • Source Library British Library
TH 9' HOUSEKEEPER's tVALUABLE PRESENT: OR, Lady's Closet Companion. BEING A NEW AND COMPLETE ART OF PREPARING CONFECTS, ACCORDING TO MODERN PRACTICE. Comprized under the follo.toing Parts; wuiz. I. Different Methods and Degrees of boiling and clarifying Sugar. II. Methods of preserving various Fruits in Sy- rups, &c. III. Methods of making Marmalades, Jams, Pales, &c. IV. Methods of making Syrups, Custards, Jellies, Blanch-mange, Conserves, Syllabubs, &c. V. Methods of prelerving. various Fruits in Brandy. VI. Methods of making a Variety of Biscuits, rich Cakes, &c. &c. VII. Methods of mixing, freezing, and workingIce Creams. VIII. Methods ds preparing Cordials and made Wines. With a Variety of other useful and elegant Articles. BY ROBERT ABBOT, Late Apprenice to Meyrs. NEcRI & GUNTER, Confeflioners; in Berkeley Square. PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR; And fold by C. COOKE, No. 17, Pater.noster Row; and all other Booksellers in Town and Coltlry. [Price as fewed, or as. 6d. neatly bornd. ] PREFACE. DURING the course of- my appren- ticefhip with MefIrs. NEGRI and G NTER, in Berkeley Square, many housekeepers to noblemen and gentle- men, on special occasions, were fre- quently present, in order to observe our peculiar method of preparing confedts. Since I left Messrs. NEGRI and GUNTER, I have had frequent applica- tions from those persons, as well as others, for receipts and information,, refpetding improvements and additions to this art. But being engaged in the service of several noblemen, and thereby deprived of the opportunity of attefiding to the numerous applications from re- fpective housekeepers for New Receipts, I determined to form the following Treatise, that they might present it to their friends; and that it might supply the place of personal application, I have comprized in it every article that is ne- ceffary to render the reader a proficient in the art. From the nature of my occupation, and the time neccffary to acquire a due knowledge of it, I cannot be supposed qualified to write in a masterly stile; and am therefore inclined to hope the candid reader will be disposed to over- A 2 look look any little errors that may be ob- served in this Treatise, confidering it not as the production of a scholar, but the essay of a man, who has devoted the greater part of his life to the pursuit of the art under consideration. I ;presume my having served an ap- prenticeihip to men of such eminence in the line of Confedionary, and such refJpedability in their connecions as ; Messrs. NEGRI & GUNTER, that it will be contidered as a recommendation of the following sheers; and as all the Trearifes I have seen contain only old and exploded Receipts, render it necef- Tary that something new Ihould appear on the iubjelt; and as the receipts I have given are tie result of my own pracice and experience, I think it will add a fan&ion to the present under- taking. Upon the whole, as I have not omit- ted any article that can be useful to housekeepers in particular, and families in general, I truf I have not arrogated to myself a right to which 1 have no claim, in prefixing to my work the title of THE HOUSEKEEPER'S VALUABLE PRESENT. R. ABBO T. CONTENTS,. PART I. Page. To clarify sugar - - - I3 To boil sugar to the degree called smooth - 14 To boil ftigar to the degree called pearled I5 To boil sugar to the degree called blown ib. To boil sugar to the degree called feathered I6 To boil sugar to the degree called crackled ib. To boilfugar to the degree called carmelled ib. PART II. To preserve oranges or lemons whole - 17 To preserve cherries without stones - - To preserve cherries with Rones - - 9 To preserve white pea plums - - - ib, To preserve yellow plums commonly called yellowvmargates -20 To preserve damascenes - - To preserve mogul, or large egg plums - ib. To preserve whole firawberries - - 2 To preserve barberries in bunches - 23 To preserve red currants in bunches - - ib. To preserve green gage plums - - - 24 To preserve green orange plums - - - 25 To preserve apricots -- ib. To preserve green apricots --- 26 To preserve green goofeberries - - - 27 A3 To To preserve angelica -- - 28 To preserve apricot, or peach chips - - ib. To preserve figs -29 To preserve dried cherries --30 To preserve peaches whole ib. To preserve pine appleechips 31 To preserve pine apples whole ib. To preserve medlars 32- To preserve pears -------33 To preserve green leaves --- ib. To preserve green grapes ---- 34 To preserve wine four plums - - 35 To preserve green limes -ib. P A R T III. Rafberry jam - - - - 36 Apricot jam - - - - 37 Peach jam - - - - ib. Pine apple jam - - 38 Barberry jam - - - - ib. Currantjam - 39 Quince marmalade - - - - ib. Quince pafle - - - - ib. Orange marmalade - - - 40 Strawberry jam - - - - - ib. Orange pate - - - - - 41 Pippin Pippin paste knots - 41 Scotch marmalade - - - - 42 Orgeat paste - - - - ib. Almond paRe - - - - - ib. Marshmallow pare - - - 43 Strafbourgh paste, or lozenges' - 44 Black currant paste - - - - ib. PART IV. To make capillaire - - 45 To make orgeat syrup - - ib. To make lemon syrup - - - - 46 Currant syrup - - -b. Marshmallow syrup - 47 To make raiberry vinegar - - - ib. To make grape efRencc, or syrup - - 48 To make orange essence - - ib. Pine apple syrup, or efence - -49 To make currant jelly - - ib. To candy eringo root - - 50 To cand orange, or lemon peel - - ib. Black currant jelly - - 5 To make a comport of pippins - 52 Comport of oranges - - ib. To make clear cakes of the jelly of any fruit 53 Calves-footjelly - ib. Clear orange jelly - - - 54 Blanch- Blanch-mange - - - - - ib. Ge-mange - - - ib. To make lemonade - - 55 To make orgeat for present use - - ib. To make orangeade - - -56 To make orange prawlins - - - ib. Red burnt almonds - - - - ib. Cedraty essence - - 57 To make a conserve of hips - - -58 Conserve of roses - - - ib. Conserve of orange flowers - - - 59 Rock candy - - - - - ib. To make gum parle - - - - 6 Mulberry syrup - - - ib. PART V. Cherries in brandy - - - 6x Apricots in brandy - - - - ib. Peaches in brandy - - - - 62 Mogul plums in brandy - - - ib. Green gages in brandy - - - 63 Pears in brandy - - - - ib. PART VI. Savoy biscuits - - - 64 Spungc biscuits - - 65 Palace Palace royal biscuits - _ - 65 Royal heart biscuits - - - - ib. Diet bread cakes - . - - 66 Naple biscuits - - - ib. Orange heart biscuits - - ib. Queen cakes - - - - 67 Champaign biscuits - - ib. Fine rusks - 68 French rusks - -ib. Yarmouth cakes - - - ib. Tunbridge water cakes - - 69 Cedraty biscuits - - ib. Italian cakes i.- - Common maccaroons - - - French maccaroons ib. Ratafia biscuits - - - ib. Orange biscuits - - - - 7 Spanish rusks - - - ib Merenges - - ib. Ginger cakes 72 Ginger-bread nuts - - ib. Filbert biscuits -_ 73 Sweetmeat biscuits - - - ib. Rock almond biscuits - - ib. Syringe biscuits - - - - 74, Italian maccaroons - - - i. Milfruit Milfruit biscuits - - 74. Marchpane biscuits - - - - 75 Biscuit drops - - - ib. To make a savoy cake - - - ib. To make a fpunge cake - - - 76 To make a plum cake - - ib. To make a rice cake - - - - ib. To make an almond cake - - - 77 To make a ratafia cake - - -ib. To make annifeed cakes - - - ib. Cinnamon drop biscuits - - 78 P A R T VII. Freezing of ice - - - - 79 To prepare the cochineal for colouring differ- ent forts of ice - - - - Ice creams, or rafberry ice - - ib. Strawberry jam - - - - ib. Apricot ice - - - - - 82 Pine apple ice - - ib. Barberry ice - - - ib. Bircuit ice - - ib. Piftachia ice - - - 83 Frefli gooseberry ice - - -ib. Chocolate ice - - - ib. Fresh rafberry ice - - - - 84 Frefln Fresh strawberry ice -- 84 Royal cream - ib. Lemon cream - 85 Orange cream - - b. Burnt cream - ib. Plain ice - - ib. Coffee ice - 86 Tea ice - - ib. Ratafia ice - ib. Vernella ice - ib. Orange ice - 8 Lemon ice - ib. <-. , .- - 10b. Cedraty ice ib. Grape ice - ib. Rafberry water - - 88 Currant water - ib. Cherry ice - ib. Punch ice - 89 Pear ice - - ib. - ib. P A R T VIII. To make raisin alder wine - Orange wine - .- Damascene wine ib. Gooseberry wine 92 Cowslip wine ib. Birch Birch wine - --93 Rafberry wine - . 94 Blackberry wine - - _ - ib. Cherry wine - - - ib. Currant wine - - - -95 To make raisin wine - ib. To make sage wine - - 96 To make clear wine - - - - ib, To make mead - - - ib. To make white mead - - 97 To make milk punch -- ib. To make citron water - - ib. Ratafia cordial - _ . 98 Orange flower brandy - ib. Surfeit water - - - 99 Cinnamon water - - - ib. Nutmeg water .- - - 100 Mint water - - - ib. Lemon water - - - ib. T H. E COMPLETE CONFECTIONER. PART I. DIFFERENT METHODS AND DE- GREES OF BOILING SUGAR. To clarify Sugar. T AKE a pan proportioned in size to the quantity of sugar you intend to clarify: to thirty pounds of sugar, put two gallons of water: whisk the white of an egg in the water, and set the pan on the fire; when the sugar begins to boil, add half a pint of water, to pre- vent its boiling over, and also to raise B tlhe C '4 3 the scum. Having skimmed the sugar till there remains only a small white scum; totally different from the other, which is foul and black, take it off, and firain it into the pan in which you in- tend to keep it for use. N. B. A particular attention to these rules, refpeding the clarifying of sugar, will greatly conduce to the effed of the diredions, which will be laid down hereafter. To boil Sugar to the Degree called SMOOTH. HAVING first clarified, put the quan- tity of sugar required into the preferv- ing'pan, and let it boil over the fire. You will ascertain its having boiled to the degree callcd fmoohb, by the follow- ing cxperiment: Dip your finger into the sugar; then put that finger and your thumb together. If in opening them you fee a finall thread drawn, which breaking immediately leaves a drop C is 3 drop on the finger, you may conclude the sugar is boiled to the degree called Jtnootb. To boil Sugar to the Degree called PEARLED TirIs method of boiling sugar is thus ascertained: Take a little of the sugar when boiling, between your finger and thumb, and if on reparation a firing ad- heres to both, it is boiled to the degree called pearled. To boil Sugar to the Degree called BLOWN. LET the sugar boil longer than on the former occasion, and make the follow- ing experiment: Dip the skimmer into the sugar; take it out immediately; and if on blowing flrongly through the holes of the fkimrnner, little bladders appear, the sugar is boiled to the degree called loin.2vi. B= 2T [ i6 ] To boil Sugar to the Degree called FEATHIERED. THIS is a higher degree of boiling sugar than either of the former. It is proved thus: Having dipped the skim- mer into the sugar, and shaken it over the pan, give it a sudden flirt behind you, when, if it flies from the skimmer in particles resembling feathers, it is boiled to this degree. To boil Sugar to the Degree called CRA CKLED. THIS degree is ascertained in the following manner: The sugar having boiled somewhat longer than on the former process; dip a skewer into it; and immediately after into cold water; if on drawing the sugar from the skewer it snaps like glass, it is boiled to the de- gree called crackled. To boil Sugar to the Degree called CA RM E LLED. THIis degree is thus ascertained: Having boiled the sugar longer f{ill, dip .[ 17 dip a skewer into it, and immediately after into cold water. If the sugar be boiled to the degree called carmelled, it will snap the very instant it touches the, cold water, and mufi be taken off direcly, to prevent burning and disco- louration. PART II. METHODS OF PRESERVING FRUITS, &c. To preserve Oranges or Lemons whole. HAVING feledCed the largest and best coloured oranges, carve them, cut a round hole in each, where the stalk grew; put them into a pan of cold water, set them over the fire, and boil them till they become so soft that you may thrust a firaw through them, fhifc- ing the water twice during the time of this boiling; then take them out, put B 3 them [ is 3 them into cold water, and let them re- main till they become cold; after which scoop out the cores with a spoon, put them again into cold water, and let them there remain forty-eight hours, ihifting the water during that space four times: drain them when taken out, put them into the preserving pan, cover them with clarified sugar, and then let them simmer over a fire for about two hours: proceed in this manner for seven or eight days ; then drain them from the sugar, and having prepared a fresh quantity boiled to the degree called pearled, put in the oranges, and having boiled them for the space of an hour, set them by for use in an earthen pan, or put them into glasses, and cover them with clarified sugar. To preserve Cherries without Stones. For a pound of cherries prepare a pound of sugar boiled to the degree called blown, into which put the cherries itoned, and C[ 9 J and having boiled them well, set them by till the next day. Having then Itrained the syrup, add some sugar and about three pints of currant juice to it, let it boil about half an hour, put in the cherries, boil all together, ikim well, and afterwards set by for use. To preserve Cherries with Siones. HAVING feleded, the finest morello fruit, and pricked each cherry with a needle; put them into a thin clarified sugar, and let them simmer an hour, or more, cautiously avoiding their coming to a boil. Proceed thus for two or three days; then firain the sugar from them, and having added more sugar with some currant juice, after a gentle boil and be- ing well skimmed, set them by for use. To prcfcrve W1.ile Pea Plumns. SELECT your plums before they are too ripe, flit each of them in the seam, scald them [ 20 J them in clear water till they become tender, then put them into cold water, in which having remained a whole night, drain, put them into sugar boiled to the degree called pearled, and having tim- mered therein twice or thrice a day for two days, drain the syrup and boil it for an hour, adding to it about a- quart of white currant juice. Then put in your plums, let all boil together, and when cold they will bie fit for use. To preserve yellow Plums commonly called yellow Margates. HAVING made choice of your plums just before they become ripe, and pre- pared as much sugar to the degree called blown, as will handsomely cover them, put them in, and giving them a gentle boil, set them by till next day and give them another boil. The day following drain them, and having boiled the syrup to the degree called pearled, put in the plums, r 2I 3 plums, and let all boil together, when they will be fit for drying, or putting into pots. N. B. You may scald and take the skins off the plums before you prefcrve them. To preJerve Danafemones. HAVING pricked the intended quan- tity, put them into a preserving pan with as much sugar as will cover them; give them one good boil, take them off and let them sand a day; on the morrow, simmer them four or five times, and thus let them remain three or four days; then drain the syrup, and adding more sugar, boil it well, put in the dama- scones, give all a good boil, skim well and set by for use. To prefcrve Mogul, or large ] gg Plums. HAVING pricked your plums, put them into cold water with three or four hand.. [ 22 1 handfulls of salt in it, and there letting them remain four days, scald them in clear water till they become tender; put them into a thin sugar, and give them a gentle boil. This done, put them by, and the next day let them simmer, and so proceed for five or fix days, till you perceive the syrup becomes thick, when it will be proper to drain and add more sugar; boil till it is ropy, then you may put in your plums; give them a gentle boil and set by for use. N. B. You must keep the plums -under the syrup in your preserving pan by putting a piece of board over them. To preserve whole Slrawberries. PREPARE as much sugar as will cover the intended quantity to the degree called blown, into which put the firaw- berries; gently boil and set them by; the next day drain them and boil the syrup till it becomes ropy or pearled, then C 23 ] then put in the strawberries, give them a gentle boil, skim them well, and put them into pots. N. B. Rafberries are preserved in the fame manner; but it is recom- mended to put some jelly drawn from goofeberries, or white currants, into the syrup. To preserve Barberries in Bunches. HAVING prepared a sufficient quan- tity of sugar to the degree called blown, put in the barberries tied in small bunches, let them boil well, then fkirri and set them by for use. To preserve Red Currants in Bunches. PREPARE as much sugar to the degree called pearled, as will cover them, into which put them, and give them a gen- tle boil: then next drain them, and adding a little more sugar, and tome juice r 24 j juice extracted from red currants, give the whole a good boil; skim them well, and they will be fit for use. N. B. White currants are preserved in the fame manner, adding only white currant juice to the syrup. 'o preserve Green Gage Pltums. FIRST prick your plums well with a needle, and having laid them in salt and water, for tight and forty hours, scald them in pump water till they become tender, after which put them in cold water, and there let them remain till they are cool; then drain and pack them in single layers in your preserving pan; and give them a gentle heat once a day, for three days; this done, drain them, add some more sugar boiled to the de- gree of what is called pearled; then put them in and give them a heat, but not so far as to boil: proceed in this manner for two or three days, till you perceive the [ 2; the syrup becomes thick, then drain them, strain the syrup, boil it to a good height, put in your plums, give the whole a gentle boil, set them by in pans, and they are ready for drying out or put. ting into jelly. To preserve Green Orange Plums. THE manner is the fame as that pre. fcribed with refpe& to the green gages: but care must be taken to cover these plums with a paper every time they are ,heated, as an effecual means of keeping in the fleam and preserving the green hue: the fame method should be ob- served as to green fruit in general. To preserve Apricots. HAVING taken the flones out, and cut your fruit in halves, scald them till they are tender, and put them into cold water: then drain, put them into a thin fugar,givethem a gentle heatand set them C by [ 26 J by: the next day, drain the syrup from them, let it boil well and afterwards put in the fruit: let the whole simmer well together; -and thus proceed from day to day, till the apricots are duly prepared, which may be known from the confif- ence of the syrup. N. B. THE Roman apricot is the best to preserve, and the orange apricot the best for jam. To preserve Green Apricots. TAKE the fruit when you can thrust a pin through the flone: prick them, and scald them till they are tender; then having drained, and put them into a thin syrup, let them simmer for half an hour every day, for a week: this done, drain them, boil some sugar to the de- gree called blown, to which add the syrup, and boiling it well, put in the fruit; let all boil together and set by. The next day, drain it, boil the syrup higher, C 27 3 higher, put in the fruit, and boil till you perceive the syrup hang like a thread from the ikimmer: the fruit are then fit for drying, or putting in jelly. N. B. Green almonds are preserved in the fame manner; but they should be scalded in soft water to take the down-off. To preserve Green Goofeberries. LET the goofeberries be gathered be- fore they are ripe, and scalded till they become yellow: then put them into cold water, and having remained twelve hours, put them into a very thin sugar, and heat th'em gently over the fire, till you perceive they begin to be green; after which drain the syrup from them, and boil it to the degree called pearled: put in your fruit, and having boiled all together, set by. Proceed in this man. ner for two, or three days, and the goofeberries willbe fit for use. C2 T r 28 3 To preserve Angelica. TAKE the angelica when young, split it into thin firips, and having scalded it till it becomes very tender, firing it, put it into the preserving pan and cover it with sugars in this state give it a gentle heat once a day, for four or five days, and when you perceive it become quite green, drain it and add some more sugar: having boiled it till it becomes ropy, put in your angelica and boil it up well; then put it by, and when it has lain in the syrup about five weeks, it will be fit to cand. To preserve Apricol, or Peach Chips. PARE the rind of the fruit into chips of the size of a Shilling: to every pound of chips, allow a pound and a half of sugar, in which boil the chips; and hav- ing set them by for two days, drain them from the syrup, and boil it to the degree called blown; then put in the chips, [ 29 3 chips, let them boil well, and having set them by for a week, drain and wash them in cold water, and put them in sieves into the flore, first sifting some sugar on them, and dry them well. To preserve Figs. HAVING pricked your figs through and through, put them into the preferv- ing pan, cover them with sugar, give them a gentle boil, and set them by. The next day drain them, and having boiled the syrup, put in the figs and set them by for two days: then drain them, add more sugar to the syrup, and having boiled it to a high degree, put in the figs, and let the whole boil up well to- gether; proceed in this manner every other day for a week, by which time the sugar will have penetrated into the firuit: then drain them, and boil the syrup till it ropes, or hangs in firings from the skimmer: put in the figs, boil well up, ikim and set them by for uic. C 3 T [ 3 ] To preserve dried Cherries. STONE the Kentish cherries, and put as much sugar into the preserving pan, as will cover them: having boiled the sugar till it cracks, put in the cherries, give them a good boil, skim, and set them by in an earthern pan till next day: then drain, and put them on sieves in a hot -tove, and turn them; they will take three days drying, and when dry, will keep two or three years. To preserve Peaches whole. TAKE the Newington peaches before they are ripe, scald them till they are tender, put them into as muchfTugar as will cover them, give them a gentle boil, and set them by till the next day.: then drain them from the syrup, which having boiled with an additional quan- tity of sugar to the degree called blown, put in the peaches, and after simmering set them by for a week; then drain the syrup C 31 1 syrup from them, and boiling it higher than before, put in the peaches, and let all boil gently together for an hour, by which time, if you find the sugar has penetrated the fruit, you may ikim and set them by for use. To preserve Pine Apple Chips. HAVING taken off the outside of the pine apple; cut it cross-ways into thin slices, which put in layers into an ear- then pan, sifting sugar over each layer, let all stand for about ten days, in which time, if melted, put it together into a preserving pan, and boil it up twice a day for three days, and let them by for drying. Co preserve Pine Apples whole. TAKE the pine applejuft before it be- comes ripe, let the top remain on it. Having perforated it with a penknife, scald it till it becomes so tender, that a firaw may be thrust through it. Let it r 32 it then remain in cold water two hours, and in that slate be put into ajar, with sugar firewed over it, boiled to the de- gree called Jmooth, and covered close down: the next day drain the syrup and boil it up, and in this manner proceed every day, till the water is extracted from the pine. As the syrup by that means will be rendered thin, you will add more sugar and boil it up to a high degree, and set the pine by for a fort- night, when if you perceive the syrup is thick, you may depend upon it the pine is properly preserved, and therefore may take it out of that syrup and put it into a clarified syrup in a glass, in which it will keep good seven years, if unaffecded by damp or wet. To preserve Mcdlars. HAVING scalded the fruit till the skins are cafily taken off; stone them at the head, cover them with sugar, give them a [ 33 3 a gentle boil, and let them stand for two days: then drain them, and boiling the syrup till it becomes ropy, put in the medlars, let all boil up gently, and set by for use. To preserve Pears. PRICK the pears through in fix places, scald them till they are tender, cut the rind smoothly off, put them into cold water with some allum in it to keep them white, and having remained in that state three hours, Thift them into a thin sugar, and give them a gentle heat every day for three or four days; then drain them; and having added some sugar to the syrup, and boiled it to the degree called pearled, put in the pears, and boil all up together: proceed in this manner, till the syrup becomes thick, then colour some of the pears red, and set them by. 'o preserve Green Leaves. TAKE grape leaves, firawberry leaves, por any other leaves: let them remain four C 34 ] four hours. in cold spring water, then take them out and put them into some- sugar, give them a gentle boil, take. them off, and set them by for use. N. B. THEY are convenient for put- ting under fruit in plates.. To preServe Green Grapes. HAVING feleaed the largest and best grapes before ripe, cut a small flit in each, and scald them; after remaining two- days in the water they are scalded ins drain, put them into a thin sugar;. give them a heat over a flow fire, and thus proceed for three days:. then drain. them, any adding to the syrup some sugar, boiled to the highefi degree of what is called blown, put in the grapes, and let all boil up together; skim well, and set them by for use. 7To [ 35 3 To preserve Wine Sour Plums. THESE plums are the best species for preserving, on account of their tartness, and should be treated in the fame man- ner as damascenes, only they will re- quire from their size a longer time in prep aration, To preserve Green Limes. HAVING scalded the limes till they are tender, and taken out the cores, put them into a thin sugar, and give them a gentle boil: then set them by and give them a gentle heat three times for three days, by which time they will be- come as green as grass: having boiled the syrup till it become ropy, put in the limes, boil up all together, and the fruit will be fit for use. N. B. GREEN walnuts, orjerkins, may be treated in the fame manner as limes; and quinces in halves and quarters, in the fame manner as pears; as there are several [ 36 3 several species of plums, and pears, that will not preserve, we recommend the fol- lowing experiments: put a few plums into a little clarified sugar, and give them a heat over a gentle fire: if they seem to melt in the sugar they will not pre- serve, if they remain firm they certainly will, provided you adhere to the rules laid down. P A R T III. METHODS OF MAKING MAMA- LADES, JAMS, PASTES, &c. Rafberry yam. RUB your ralberries through a sieve to a pulp: then measure it with a pint ladle (which is exactly a pound) into your preserving pan: boil it well, and fiir it all the time to keep it from burn- ing: C 37 1 ing: to a pound of pulp, allow three quarters of sugar; when it has boiled till it becomes tolerably fiiff, put in the sugar lifted fine, and boil it up well for half an hour: then put it into pots. Apricot Jam. BOIL your apricots to a pulp, then rub it through a sieve: to a pound of pulp, allow a pound of sugar and two ounces of bitter almonds pounded fine: dry the pulp well over the fire, then put in the sugar and almonds: boil all together for about an hour, and then it will be fit for use. Peach 7am. PROCEED with this in the fame man- ner as above, but allow one pound and a quarter of clarified sugar to a pound of pulp. Boil the sugar to the degree called blown, then put in the pulp, and boil it till it jus drops off the slimmer. D N. 13. Yo j 38 3 N. B. You should be careful to keep ltirring this, and all other jams, while they are boiling. -Pine Apple yam. CUT your pine apple into slices. cover it with powder sugar, and let it fiand a fortnight; then pounding it in a mortar till it is fine, pulp it through a sieve; to a pound of pulp, allow halfa a pound of clarified sugar, boil the sugar to the degree called blozon, and finish it in the fame manner as peach jam. .Barberry 7am. PUT your barberries into the oven till they become thoroughly hot, then pass them through a sieve. To a pound of pulp, allow a pound and a quarter of sugar sifted fine. Boil the pulp till one 'half is consumed, then put in the sugar, mix it well, and put it into pots. Currant - 39 3 Currant yam. TAKE the currant pulp when you have strained the liqour from it forjelly. To a pound of pulp, allow a pound of sifted sugar. Boil the pulp well; then put inthe sugar, and boil it all for about half an hour, and it will be fit for use. N. B. THE quicker your fire is for all red fruit, the better will be the colour. . Quince Marmalade. PARE your quinces and cover them: then boil them till tender, and pulp them through a sieve, with half the quantity of apples boiled in the fame manner. To a pound of pulp, allow a pound and a quarter of clarified sugar: boil the sugar to the degree called blown, then put in the pulp, and boil it all for about half an hour, then put it into pots. S uince Paste. THE pulp being prepared in the manner abovementioned; allow a pound D2 of t 40 of sugar and boil it till it cracks: then put in the pulp, and having boiled it for a quarter of an hour, put it in pots, into the ffove, and in about three or four hours you may turn them out; cut them into quarters, and dry them. N. B. You mutl keep your flove in a temperate heat. Orange Marmalade. BOIL the feville orangespeel till it is tender, and take the white from it; lay it in water all night, to take the bitter- ness off, then pound and pulp it through a sieve. To a pound of pulp, allow a pound of the bell moifl sugar; boil the pulp till it is near one half consumed, then put in the sugar; boil it all toge- ther for half an hour, and put it into pots. Strawberry Jam. THIS is made after the majnner of the ,raberry, except allowing to a pound of pulp, C 41 ] pulp, one pound of sugar. Be careful to boil it ltiffer than any otherjam. Orange Pafle. PULP your oranges with apple mixed with it. To a pound of pulp, allow a pound and a quarter of sugar: boil the sugar till it cracks; then put in the pulp, and boil it over a quick fire, stirring it all the time for about twenty minutes, then put it into tins made for the pur- pose, and dry them inr the stove. Pippin Paste Knots. BOIL your apples tender, and pulp them; to a pound of pulp, allowing a pound of sugar: boil it till it cracks, then put in the pulp, and boiling all together for ten minutes, run it on pewter plates, put it in the flove, and when dry, cut it into firips, make it up into knots, and dry them on sieves. * N. B. If you would colour them red, put in some prepared cochineal. D.3 a Scotch C 4r J Scotch' Marmalade. WHEN you make your orange mar- malade, put a little by; then cut some orange-peel into fine firips, and giv- ing them a boil in a little clarified sugar,. mix them in the marmalade, and put them into pots. Orgeal Paftre CALCINE a pound of Jordan almonds, and four ounces of bitter almonds, with water, and a little orange flower water: boil a pound and an half of clarified sugar to the degree called blown, then put in your almonds, boil all together for a quarter of an hour, and put it into pots. Almond Paste. To a pound of almonds calcined, al- low two pounds of sugar sifted fine; pound the almonds with a little orange flower and rofc water; put the pasei into a r 43 '] a preserving pan, dry it on the fire till it becomes stiff; put in the sugar and fir it till you perceive it will nortfick to your finger; then put it on a marble, and roll it up in a lump for use. MarJhamallow PaJte. TAKE a pound and a half of gum arabic, a pound of fine sugar, and fix ounces of marshmallow root ; pound the- gum and sugar very fine, and put them into your preserving pan with half a pint of orange flower water and rose water mixed: then boil your marfhmal- low-root in a quart of water, drain the liquor, and put that to it: set it on a flow fire, and fir it till it becomes in some degree fliff, then put in the whites of twelve eggs, and Rirring it till it be- comes quite fliff, turn it out on a marble stone, and, when cold, cut it into square pieces, and put them in boxes. StraJbolirgh [44 J SiraJbourgh Pa.te, or Lozenges. BOIL a pound of clarified sugar, and two ounces of honey to a carmel height; then pour it on a marble itone, and be- fore it becomes cold mark it in squares, anrt'when cold break it in pieces, and keep it in boxes secure from damp. Black Currant Paste. BOIL your black currants to a pulp. To a pound of pulp, allow halfa pound of apple pulp: dry that on a flow fire, then put in a pound of sugar boiled to a crack, mix it well, then run-it on pewter plates, put it in the flove, and when dry, cut it in small square pieces, and dry them. [ 45 PART IV. OF .SYRUPS, JELLIES, CANDIES, &c. To make Capillaire. TAKE twelve pints of clarified sugar; to which add one pint of good orange flower water, and thejuice of eight good lemons; set it on a flow fire, and put in a pint of water with the whites ftiur eggs whisked: let it boil, and$inim all the scum that rifes, then itrain it through a lawn sieve, or flannel bag, and put it into bottles. To make Orgeat Syrup. CALCINE a pound of blanched Jordan almonds, and a few bitter ones, mixed with a little orange flower water; then put 46 ] put in two quarts of water, firain all through a fine lawn sieve, or cloth; put what is itrained into seven pints of sugar, boiled- to the degree called cracked. Let it simmer for ten minutes, skim it well, and when cold put it in bottles. To make Lemon Syrup. BOIL fix pints of sugar, to the degree called blown, add the juice of twenty good lemons and the rind of two; clarify jn the fame manner as the capillaire. N. B. ORANGE syrup is made in the fame manner, except in allowing to fix oranges the juice of two lemons. Currant Syrup. MASH your currants, and let them be all night over a sieve to drain; itrain the liquor through a flannel bag; to a pint ofliquor, put a pound and a halfof sugar : boil the sugar to the degree called blown, then put the liquor in, and boil all till the 47 3 the scum is entirely off, and put it into bottles. DAMASCENE syrup is made in the fame ,manner. Marjhmallow Syrup. TAKE one pound of marshmallow root, and put to it a gallon of water; re- duce it on a flow fire to three pints, then strain it, and put it into a preserving pan, with seven pints of sugar, and three pints of clear water; clarify in the fame manner as capillaire. To make RaJberry Vinegar. EXTRACT a liquor from the rafber- ries, in the fame manner as from cur- rants: to a pint of liquor, add two pounds of clarified sugar, and a pint of the bell white wine vinegar: boil all over a flow fire till the scum is taken off, and, when cold, put it in bottles. To C 48 ] To make Grape Elence, or Syrup. To half a pound of good dry elder flowers, put three quarts of boiling water; let it stand close covered two hours; then itrain it through a lawn sieve, and put to it the juice of twelve good lemons; boil ten pints of sugar to the degree called blown; put in the liquor, and boil till the scum is entirely off; then strain it through a lawn sieve, and put it into bottles. To make Orange Efence. GRATE half a hundred of oranges, and put into your preserving pan, add ten pounds of sugar, and the juice of the oranges with thejuice of twelve lemons. Boil all till it becomes tolerably thick, then put it in a ltone jar for use. N. B. You will find this exceedingly useful in making of ice in the summer time, when oranges are not to be had. Pille [ 49 ] Pine Apple Syrup, or EJence. DRAIN the syrup from the chips, and clarify in the fame manner as you would a pan offugar; .put in the juice of a few lemons. To make Currant Jelly. YOUR currants being mashed on the fire, put them on a sieve all night to drain; then strain the liquor through a flannel bag: to a pint of liquor, allow three quarters of sugar; boil the sugar ;to the degree called crackled, then put in the liquor, and boil all till it jellies, which you may know by its hanging in flakes from the skimmer: be careful to kflim it well. N. B. IF yourjelly is for glasses, use half white currants and half red, and it wvill not look of too dark a colour. APPLE jelly, rafberry jelly, or jelly from any other fruit, may be made in a similar manner. E 91 [ 5 so To Candy Eringo Root. TAKE the roots pared and boiled to a proper softness, and put them into some sugar boiled fmootb; then simmer them three times a day for three days; let them lay a month in the syrup, and when you cand them, boil some sugar to the degree called blown, and put them into it; let them remain about five mi- nutes, and grain the fugar'by rubbing it up the fides of the pan, 'then-take them out, and lay them on sieves in a gentle Rove. To Cand Orange, or Lemon Peel. BoI. your peel tender, and take out the inside pith; lay them in cold water for a whole night, to take the bitterness off; pack them one within the other, in your preserving pan, cover them with clarified sugar, and let them boil gently for two hours every day for a week, then take them out and pack them in a jar, r[ sI jar, or calk; put more sugar to the syrup, boil it to a good height, pour it over the peels, and let them remain full a month; then drain the syrup from them, three or four different times, and they will be fit to cand, which you may do as follows: TAKE them out of the syrup, and wash them in warm water; dry them in the flove, and put them into'as much sugar, boiled to the degree called blown, as will cover them: boil them in the sugar to the fame degree; then grain the sugar, take the peels out immediately, put them on a wire sieve, and when cold, they are fit for use. CANDIED citron, orange, and lemon chips, are prepared exactly in the fame manner. Black Currant yelly. MASH your black currants on the fire and pulp them; to a pound of pulp, E 2 allow [ 52 ] allow a pound of sugar; boil the sugar till it cracks, then put in the pulp, and boil all till it begins to jelly. To make a Comport of Pippins. PARE your pippins neatly, then take the cores out right down the middle, after that, scald your pippins till tender, put then into clarified sugar with a few cloves, a little mace, and the rind of a lemon, with the juice of four - let them simmer very gently for two hours, and when cold, they are fit to serve up to table. PEARS are done in the fame manner, and you may colour them, as you do preserved quinces. Comport of Oranges. CARVE your oranges neatly, cut them into eight parts, scald them tender, put them into clarified sugar with the juice of [ 53 3 of three or four oranges, let them fim- mer gently for two hours, then add half a pint of mountain wine, and when cold serve them up. to table. To make Clear Cakes of the Jelly of any Fruit. To half a pint of jelly, allow fix ounces of sugar to a high degree of blown, then put in the jelly, and let it simmer but not boil; skin it well, put it into pots, and dry it in the fame man- ner as quince paffte. Calves-Foot Yelly. TAKE two calves-feet ready cleaned, put to them fix quarts of water; boil it on the fire till it is reduced to three, then firain, and put to it the juice of twelve lemons, the whites of eight eggs, a little cinnamon, a few corianders, and a little sugar; whisk all together, set it on the fire, and let it boil with half a pint of mountain in it, then (train it three times - . .E 3 through r 54 through a jelly bag, and put it in grafles. Clear Orange Yelly. RASP the rind of your oranges, and' squeezing fix or eight oranges, and the juice of three lemons with four ounces; of isinglass, whisk the whites of five eggs among it, and let it boil, then strain it through a lawn sieve, put it into moulds ; allow to this quantity, fix ounces of sugar. Blanch Mange. POUND four ounces of almonds with a few bitter ones, and a little orange flower water, fine; mix them in a pint ofcream, and half a pint of milk, put in fix ounces. of isinglass, and a quarter of a pound of sugar; boil all together till the isinglass is consumed, then sIrain, and put it into moulds. Ge Mange. SQUEEZE the juice of fix oranges, and rasp i s i i i rasp the rinds of two, put it into a pint' and a half of cream, with a little sugar, add to that about four ounces of ifin- glass; boil it till it is dissolved, put in a- little saffron as it is boiling, and set it by- in moulds. To make Lemonade. To half a pint of clarified sugar, put the juice of five lemons, and rasp the- rind of one, add to this a pint of spring. water, then pass it through a lawn sieve,, and set it by for use. To make Orgeat for present Use.. POUND four ounces of blanched al- monds very fine, with a few bitter ones,. and a little water, mix with that a quart of clear spring water, and a table spoon- ful of orange flower water: sweeten to your palate, and strain it through a lawn sieve for use. To [ 56 ] To make Orangeade. To half a pint of sugar, put the juice of five oranges'and two lemons: rasp the rind of one orange, add a- pint of clear water, and strain it off for use. - To make Orange Prawlins. QUARTER your oranges, take the white out of the rind; cut them into thin tlrips, put them into your preferv- ing pan, with just sufficient sugar to cover the bottom of the pan: let them boil till you perceive the sugar becomes thick, then take them off and stir them till the sugar grains and flicks to them. Lift the loose sugar from them, and. set them by for use. N. B. LEMON prawlins and orange flowers arc prepared exactly in the fame manner. Red Burnt Alinmnds. TAKE a pound of the best Jordan al- monds, [ 57 1 monds, put them into a round bottom preserving pan, with a pint of clarified sugar, let it boil till the sugar comes to the degree called blozn, and the almonds begin to crack: then take them off, and tir till they begin to' cool; when the almonds clog to the sugar; lift the loose sugar from them, put in a pint of clarified sugar with the loose sugar, and boil it till it cracks; then put in the al- monds, and fir them as before: sift them and part those that are coupled, boil a pint more of clarified sugar till it cracks, put in the almonds, and stir them till the sugar clings round them; then put in a gill of cochineal, and shake them over the fire till they become dry: sift them, and put them in a gentle flove for two or three hours. BROWN burnt almonds are prepared in a similar manner. Cedraly EjeZnce. WEIGH a pound of ccdraty eflcnce, boil. [ 58 ] boil seven pints of clarified sugar to the degree called blown, then put in the es- .fence, and the juice of twenty lemons: -boil alltogether for about half an hour; fkim.it well, and when cold, put it into bottles. 2To make' a Conserve of Hips. TAKE two pounds of hips, stone them and lay them a whole night in spring water; then pound them to a rmah, and put them into three pints of clarified sugar, boiled to the degree called blown; give all together a good boil, and set. them by for use. Conserve of Roses. TAKE a quarter of a pound of damask rose leaves, beat up a pound of coarse sifted sugar, with the whites of three eggs, put in the rofc leaves, and mix them; then roll them up in small balls on paper, and set thcm in the fiove to dry.. B. «~~~~~~~~X ]o 1 59 3 N. B. You may put in a little cochi- neal to colour it. Conserve of Orange Flowers. BOIL a pint of sugar to a high degree, put ifi a quarter of a pound of orange flowers; boil it to the fame degree again, then rub the sugar till it grains; pour it immediately on a marble stone, and when cold, break it into pieces. Rock Candy. TAKE different flhapes, cut out of gum pafle, or you mufl candy pippin paste knots; let them be very dry, then put them in a square tin box in.layers, with a wire between each layer; fill the' tin up with sugar, boiled to a strong de- gree; fet.it in the hot stove; the next day, drain it, take them out and put them on sieves in the stove to dry. N. B. IN this manner you may candy violets, or any other flower; but be [ 60 ] be careful they are very dry, else they will not take the sugar. To make Gum Pa/le. TAKE sone gum traganr, and soak it in water, then squeeze it through a cloth, put it into the mortar, and pound it with fine sugar, sifted fine; then take it out, and mix it up with sugar till it becomes stiff. Mbulberry Syrup. SQUEEZE your mulberries: to apintof fruit, put a pound of sugar; let it dif- solve all night, then boil it up to a good height, with the juice of four lemonsj skim it well, and put itin bottles for use, [ 6 ] PART V. FRUITS IN BRANDY. Cherries in Brandy. PuT your cherries into jars, and to a quart of French brandy, allow half a pint of clarified sugar: mix your sugar and brandy, cover the cherries with it, let them fland a month, then fill the jars again, and cover them up for use. N. B. TIE morello cherries are the most proper, and you may infuse raf- berries, or mulberries, in the fame manner. Apricots in Brandy. TAKE a pan and half, fill it with pump F Wi.ltr. [ 6 ] water, put in a little clarified sugar; then put in your apricots, and scald them till tender; put them into cold water with a piece of allum in it; let them lay in that state for two hours till quite cold; put them in jars, and cover them with white French brandy: to two quarts of brandy, allow three pints of clarified sugar. Peaches in Brandy. WIPE the down off your peaches, prick them with a small knife in three places, scald them in some water, with the juice of three or four lemons in it; then take them out, put them in jars, and cover them with white brandy: to two quarts of brandy, put three pints of clarified sugar. Mogul Plums in Brandy. TAKE your mogul plums when they are halfpreferved, drain them dry, put them [ 63 ] them injars and cover them with brandy. To a quart of brandy, allow half a pint of clarified sugar. Green Gages in Brandy. THESE are prepared in the fame man- ner.as any greenplum. Pears in Brandy. SCALD your pears tender, with some lemon juice in the water: put them into cold water and pare the rind off; lay them in allum and water all night, to keep them white; then drain and put them into jars: to a quart of brandy, allow a pint of clarified sugar. r 64 1 PART VI. METHODS OF MAKING BISCUITS AND CAKES. IT is here necessary to premise that particular care must be taken to keep the utensils entirely free from grease of any kind: and the flour and sugar quite dry, as in cafe of neglect you can- not make good biscuits. Savoy Biscuits. TAKE one pound and a half of sugar, one pound and two ounces of flour, and twenty four eggs: separate the yolks from the whites, beat the yolks and sugar together with a spoon: whisk the whites up stiff, and mix with the yolks; whisk it all on aL flow fire till warm, then r 65 ] then take it off and whisk it till cold; mix in the flour, and drop them through a funnel made for the purpose. N. B. THEY require a hot oven, and you Ihould sift a little sugar over them, just before you put them in. Spunge Bicuils. TAKE one pound of sugar, and three quarters of flour, and mix in the fame manner as the savoy biscuits: there will not require so hot an oven as the former. Palace Royal Biscuits, ARE made in the fame manner as savoy biscuits, and are baked in small paper boxes. Royal Heart Bifc/is. To a pound of almonds beat fine, put a pound and a half of sugar, half a pound of flour, sixteen whole eggs, and F 3 twelve [ 66 ] twelve yolks. Beat the sugar and al- monds up well by degrees with the eggs; then put in the flour, and set it into moles, they will require a gentle oven. Diet Bread Cakes.,; TAKE one pound of moist sugar, one pound and a quarter of flour, and seven eggs: let your sugar boil with better than half a pint of water; then wifk your eggs and sugar up well: take it off, and whisk it till it is cold, then mix in your flour, and put it into moles. Naple Bicruiis, ARE made in the fame manner as diet bread, but add a little more flour. Orange Heart Bifciils. TAKE one pound and a halfoffugar, three quarters of a pound of flour, one pound and a half of yolks of eggs, eight preserved orange peels, and two ounces [ 67 3 ounces of-almonds; pound your peels and almonds fine, then beat it up and proceed in the fame manner as in mak- ing the royal heart biscuits. .ueen Cakes. TAKE one pound and a quarter of flour, one pound offugar, and one pound of butter, a quarter of a pound of cur- rants, and eight eggs: cream your butter, and beat it up with the eggs and sugar, then put in the flour and currants. Champaign Bificuils. TAKE the whites of eight eggs with some flour, and half a pound of butter; beat the eggs and sugar together: melt the butter, and beat it up; then put in the flour and a few carraway feeds: fold a paper up in the form of a fan, and drop them in the ridges: they will require a hot oven. ];ine C 68 Fine RuJks. MAKE a good diet bread parle, bake it in long tins; when cold, cut it in slices, and brown them in the oven: put a few carraway feeds in the paste. French Rujks. TAKE three pounds. of sugar, four pounds of flour, and two pounds of yolks of eggs: beat the sugar and yolks together, then mix in the flour, and roll it up in long rolls; bake it, and when cold, cut it into thin slices. Tarmouth Cakes. TAKE one pound and a half of flour, one pound of sugar, and one pound of butter, fix ounces of currants, and fix eggs: beat the eggs and sugar together, melt the butter, and mix it and the flour up to a stiff paste: part it half for plums, and half for feed; then roll it out, cut it into round shapes, and bake them in a gentle oven. tinabridge r 69 1 T'unridge Waler Cakes. TAKE one pound of flour, one pound of butter, three quarters of a pound of sugar, half a pint of cream, and four eggs: mix the eggs, sugar, and cream together, put in the butter melted, and beat it up well; then mix in the flour, and a few carraway feeds, roll the part out quite thin; cut it into round cakes, and bake them in a flow oven. Cedraty Bfcuils. TAKE one pound and three quarters of sugar, half a pound of yolks, and three quarters of a pound of butter: mix these together, then roll them up with as much flour as is necessary to fliffen it: make them into round rings, and bake them. Italian Cakes. TAKE the whites of twelve eggs with some flour and sugar; whisk the eggs and [70 and sugar over the fire, till hot; then take. it off, and whisk it till it is quite cold, and put in the flour: drop them in round cakes on paper, and bake them. Common Maccaroons. TAKE one pound of almonds, one pound of sugar, and the whites of ten eggs, and a little rose water: pound your almonds with the whites, and rose water, then mix in the sugar, and lay them out on wafer paper. French Maccaroons. To a pound of almonds, allow two pounds of sugar mixed in the fame way, and laid out in the fame manner. Ratafia B/cuils. TAKE halfa pound of fwcet almonds, and halFa pound of bitter: pound them fine, mixed with whites of eggs, then add two pounds and a half of sugar; beat [ 7i ] beat it up well with whites of eggs, then drop them on paper, and bake them in a flow oven. Orange Biscuits. Mix one pound of almonds, with two pounds of sugar in the fame manner as ratafia biscuits; but rasp the rind of eight China oranges among it, and drop them in small drops. 'LEMON biscuits are made in the fame manner. SpaniAs Rujks. TAKE half a pound of yolks, half a pound of sugar, and half a pound of flour; two ounces of butter, two lemons rasped, and a glass of brandy: mix all together, then roll it up stiff, and make it in rings, and bake them. Merenges. TAKE a pint of sugar, and the whites of fix eggs; boil the sugar to the degree called 7 ~72 t 72 ] called blown, then grain it, and mix in the whites whisked Itiff: lay them out in oval shapes, and brown them in the oven, put a piece of barberry jam in be- tween, and put two halves together. Ginger Cakes. TAKE one pound of butter,. three pounds of flour, one pound of sugar; a pint of cream, and five eggs: beat the eggs, cream, and sugar together; melt the butter and put it in, then mix in the flour with a few carraway feeds, and fix ounces of ginger; roll them thin, and bake them in a flow oven. Ginger-Bread Nuis. To five pounds of flour, put fix pounds of treacle, one pound and a half of sugar, and a pound and a half of butter: rub the butter with the flour and sugar, then mix it up with the trea- cle; and put in fix ounces of ginger, and a 73 1 and four ounces of pimento, and drop them in drops. They will require a flow oven. Filbert Biscuits. TAKE a pound of nut kernels; let them be exceeding dry, pound them fine, with the whites of eggs; mix in two pounds of sugar, begat the paste up with whites of eggs. Drop them out in small drops. Sweetmeat Bicuits. TAKE a pound of sugar, a pound and a half of flour, the yolks of twenty eggs, with half a pound of almonds; pound the almonds fine with the yolks: mix in the sugar, and beat it up well, then mix in the flour, bake it in a square cake, afterwards ice it: cut it into ihapes, and put orange peels on them. Rock Almond Biycuits. CUT your almonds very fine: to a pound of which, allow four ounces of CG Jiga r, C 74 3 sugar, and the whites of fix eggs; whisk the eggs stiff, then put in the sugar and almonds; set them in lumps on wafer paper, and bake them in a very flow oven. Syringe Biscuits. To a pound of almonds, allow four pounds of sugar: pound the almonds fine, mixed with whites of eggs; then put in the sugar, mix it into a ftiffpafte; then push it through your jumbal mould, and form it into different shapes. Italian Maccaroons. To a pound of almonds, allow two pounds and a quarter of sugar: mix it all in the fame manner as ratafia biscuits. Drop it on wafer paper, and put some almonds cut small on the top of every drop. Milfruit Biscuits. Cur some almonds small, and colour fomc of the pieces red; then cut some orange- [ 75 3 orange-peel small, and mix them toge- ther: dip them in icing, and lay them on wafer paper, in the Shape of rock biscuits. Marchpane Biscuits. BEAT a pound of almonds in a mortar, with a little rose water, and the whites of four eggs: mix in a pound of sugar, roll it out, and put two pieces together, with some rafberry jam between: ice it, and cut it into different shapes; bake them in a flow oven. Bitfuil Drops. To a pound of sugar, allow a pound and a quarter of flour, and eight eggs: mix them in the fame manner as fpunge biscuits; drop them on wafer paper. COM MON savoys are made in the fame manner. To make a Savoy Cake. TAKE the whites of fix eggs, with some flour and sugar; beat the yolks G z and 36 and sugar together: mix it with the whites whisked stiff, then put iin the flour, and bake it in a gentle oven. To make a Spunge Cake. TAKE the whites of fix eggs in sugar, and the weight of four eggs in flour; mix it up in the fame manner as a savoy cake. To make a Plum Cake. To two pounds of flour, allow two pounds of sugar, two pounds of butter, and sixteen eggs: cream the butter, and beat it all up together; then mix in a pound of currants. N. B. SEED Cake is made in the fame manner. To make a Rice Cake. To a pound of sugar, allow a pound of flour, and halfa pound of rice pounded fine, and ten eggs: mix it up exaClly in the fame manner as diet-bread. To [ 77 3 To make an Almond Cake. To half a pound of almonds, allow halfa pound of sugar, and the yolks of sixteen eggs; beat it up well, then put in three whole eggs, and mix in fix ounces of flour. N. B. It will require a flack oven. CTo make a Ralafia Cake. To a pound of sugar, allow three quarters of a pound of flour, and four ounces of bitter almonds pounded fine: mix it up with fourteen eggs, in the fame manner as a savoy cake. To make Annieed Cakes. To half a pound of sugar, allow a pound of flour, three whites of eggs, and half a pound of butter: mix all there ingredients together with a little cream, then put in two ounces of annifeeds, roll it very thin, and cut it into round cakes. G 3 Cinnamon t 78 j Cinnamon Drop Bacuiis. To a quarter of a pound of sweet al- monds, allow half a pound of sugar: pound the almonds fine with whites of eggs, put in a little cinnamon efTence, or a little cinnamon pounded fine; then drop them on paper in small drops, and bakc them in a flow oven. C 79 3 P A R T VII. OF ICE CREAMS, AND THE PROPER METHODS OF MIXING, FREEZING, AND WORKING THEM. Freezing of Ice. HAVE ready a freezing pot in ice and salt; put in your ice cream, cover the pot, keep turning it till the water comes round the pot; then open it and scrape it down: continue turning it, and scraping it down as it freezes, till it be- comes quite hard and smooth. IF an ice cream is mixed too rich, put in a little more cream: if it is poor, put in some more jam. If a water ice is mixed too rich, it will require some more h [ o ] more water: if it is too poor, put in some clarified sugar. IF an ice is poor, the firfl time you scrape it down, it will feel quite rough and hard: on the contrary, if an ice is too rich, it will not freeze at all. ALL fruit ices that are put into the Shapes of fruit, Thould have a paper round the moulds, jufi as you put them in the ice: let them lay in ice and salt for an hour. N. B. Before you turn your ices out, take .care to make the water come up the fides of the tub, and in turning them out, put your moulds just into hot water, and then out again; then the ice cream will come out easily. N. B. ALL ices that are in the shape of fruit, should be coloured according to .the fruit they represent. Ta C 81 ] To prepare the Cochineal for colouring different Sorts of Ice. To an ounce of cochineal pounded fine, allow a quart of clear river water: let it boil,then put in the cochineal withl a table spoonful of pounded rock allum, and the fame quantity of cream of tartar; if it seems to be a purple colour, add a little more cream of tartar, let it all boil for two minutes, then itrain it into a bottle for use. Ice Creams, or Rafberry Ice. To fix ounces of rafberry jam, allow three quarters of a pint of cream, mix it well; then pass it through a sieve, and colour it. Strawberry yam, Is mixed the fame way, allowing the juice of two lemons. Ap; icot [ 82 Apricot Ice. To four ounces of apricot jam, allow three quarters of a pint of cream, and a few bitter almonds pounded, the juice of two lemons, and a tea spoonful of cochineal; pass it all through a sieve for use. Pine Apple Ice. To four ounces of pine apple jam, put a table spoonful of pine apple syrup, and three quarters of a pint of cream, and pass it through a sieve, with the juice of two lemons. Barberry Ice. To half a pound of barberry jam, put three quarters of a pint of cream: pars it through a hair sieve, and colour it. Bi'cuit Ice. To four yolks of eggs, allow three quarters of a pint of cream, three ounces of C 83 ] of fpunge biscuits, a little cinnamon, and four ounces of sugar: stir it all on the fire, till it begins to thicken, then pass it through a sieve. Pijfachia Ice. To three yolks of eggs, allow three quarters of a pint of cream, two ounces of pillachia kernels pounded fine, and four ounces of sugar: boil your yolks and cream, put in your kernels pounded, then colour it green, and pass it through a sieve. FreJh GooSeberry Ice. SCALD half a pint of goofeberries tender, and paTs them through a hair sieve; mix in four ounces of sugar, and three quarters of a pint of cream. 'Chocolale Ice. MELT three ounces of chocolate on the fire, then take three yolks of eggs, two [ 84 J two ounces of sugar, and three quarters of a pint of cream; and boil it till it thickens, then put in the chocolate, and pass it through a sieve. FreJh Rafberry Ice. TAKE half a pint of fresh rafberries, pass them through a sieve, with thejuice of two lemons; mix in half a pint of cream, and four ounces of sugar; then colour it. FreJ/ Strawberry Ice, Is prepared in the fame manner. Royal Cream. To four eggs, allow three quarters of a pint of cream, a little cinnamon, four ounces of sugar, and a few coriander feeds: boil it all till it begins to thicken, then pass it through a sieve. Lemon t 85 3 Lemon Cream. To five yolks of eggs, allow three quarters of a pint of cream, four ounces of sugar, and the rind of a lemon cut thin: boil it all till it thickens, then pass it, with the juice of four lemons, through a sieve. Orange Cream, Is prepared in a similar manner, Burnt Cream. TAKE a little sugar and burn it on the fire in a dry ftew pan; have ready a good royal cream, and mix in the burnt sugar. N. B. THIS cream you may either freeze, or put it under a crocant. Plain Ice. TAKE half a pint of the befl cream you can get; whisk it in your'freezing pot till stiff; then put in a little clari- sied sugar, and freeze it. H Cofiee [ 86 ] Cosee Ice. To four whites of eggs, put three ounces'of sugar, three quarters of a pint of cream, and an ounce of whole coffee; boil it all till it thickens, then pass it through a sieve for freezing. Tea Ice, Is prepared in the fame manner. Ratafia Ice. To three eggs, allow four ounces of sugar, two ounces of ratafia biscuits, and three quarters of a pint of cream; boil it all till it thickens, then pass it for use. Fernella Ice. To four eggs, allow three ounces of sugar, and halfa pint of cream, put in half an ounce of vernella; boil it till it thickens, then pass it. N. B. ALL ice creams that are mixed over thc fire, ihould be stirred, to pre- vent vent their fickin to the bottom of th vent their Rlicking to the bottom of the pan. WATER ICES, PINTS EACH. Orange Ice. To half a pint of clarified sugar, allow thejuice of five oranges, and two lemons: rasp the rind of two oranges, mix it all with a quarter of a pint of water, and pass it through a lawn sieve. Lemon Ice. To half a pint of clarified sugar, allow thejuice of fix lemons, and the rind of one: mix it with a quarter of a pint of water, and pass it through a lawn sieve. Cedraly Ice. To a gill of cedraty essence, allow the juice of four lemons, a quarter of a pint of clarified sugar, and the fame quantity of water, pass it through a lawn sieve. Grape Ice. MAKE a good lemon ice; then mix in a gill of grape eflence, and pass it through a lawn sieve. II 2 RafJerry C 88 ] Rafberry Krater. To three quarters of a pound of jam, allow a pint and a quarter of water, and the juice of two lemons pass it through a hair sieve, and colour it. Currant Water. TAKE a quart of fresh currants; rub them through a sieve, mix it with a quarter of a pint of clarified sugar, and the fame quantity of water; then colour and firain it. Cherry Ice. TAKE a pound of morello, or Kentish cherries; bruise them in the mortar, firain them through a hair sieve, and mix the juice with a quarter of a pint of water, and the fame quantity of clarified sugar, pass it through a lawn sieve, and colour it. ALL water ices may be made of the fresh fruit in a similar manner; but if you make a water ice of jam, you mufi allow [ 89. allow double the quantity of fruit, to what you allow in making cream ices. Punch Ice. MAKE a good lemon ice, and mix with it a gill of brandy, and halfa gill of rum, or arrack. THrs ice is only fit for glasses. Pear Ice. TAKE four good mellow pears: rasp them, then mix it with the juice of four lemons, half a pint of clarified sugar, and a quarter of a pint of water; firain it through a sieve for use. ^U\ § .j~u ^'0 ^'pr^^~~~··:·; *-^. ^t^( ·e ~l -^ <_L -,-y^^yy € 90 1 P A R T VIII. CORDIALS, AND MADE WINES To make Rafin Alder Wine. TAKE four gallons of boiling water: to every gallon, add five pounds of Ma- laga raisins cut small; pour the water boiling hot upon them, and let it stand nine days, 'firring it twice a day: boil your alder-berries, as you do cur- rants for jelly, and strain it; then add to every gallon of liquor, one pint of alder- berry juice, and fir it all together with half a pint of yeast; let it work well, and remain in the cafkl for two or three months; then bottle it off. Orange [ 9I ] Orange. iine. TAKE fix gallons of water, and twelve pounds of Lisbon sugar, the whites of fix eggs well beaten; let all boil toge- ther, then put it into a large preserving pan, with thejuice of half a hundred of oranges, twelve lemons, and the rinds of twelve oranges: give all a boil together, then put.it into a barrel with ten quarts of Rhenish wine, and a pint and a half of good yeast; let it work well for a week, then stop it up for a month, and bottle itup. Damascene WJine. To every gallon of water; put two pounds and a half of sugar, which you muds boil and skim well: to every gallon of this, put five pints of damascenes froned; let it boil, then put it into a cask: work it three or four days, then stop it up for use. Gcofeberr [ 92 ]- Gooseberry Wine. To every three pounds of ripe goose- berries, put a pint of spring water, bruise your fruit; put it into a tub, and pour the water on them ; let them stand a whole day, then to every three pounds of fruit, put a pound of moist sugar: stir it till the sugar is diflblved, and let it fiand twenty-four hours more; then ikim the head clear off, and put the li- quor into a cafl; let it work three or four days before you flop it up: let it re- main four months before you bottle it, and if it is not fine, let it stand in bottles till it is, and then rack it off into other bottles. ' Cowslip Wine. To fix gallons of water, allow thirty pounds of Malaga raisins; boil the water, and measure it out of your copper on your raisins: cut small and put into a tub; let them work together twelve hours, [ 93 ] hours, at the end of that time firain off, and press the raisins hard, to extrad the essence; then take a little good yeast, and mix it with some lemon syrup, put in two pecks of cowslips, and let your ingredients work together for three days, stirring them twice a day; then flop it up, and bottle off in three months. Birch Wine. ALLOW to every gallon of birch water, two. pounds.of sugar; boil it half an hour, ikim it well, let it fland a little; then pour it off the grounds, work it well with yeast, before you put it into ' your cask, and smoke the cask with brimstone. I would recommend a small bag of flit raisins, to be put in the cask, and let it stand three or four months before you bottle it off. Rajberry C 94 ] RaJberry Wine. PUT three pounds of raisins of the fun floned, into two gallons of hot water, add to these, fix quarts of rafber- ries, and two pounds of loaf sugar: let all stand three days, then strain, put in a pound more sugar; mix in a little yeafl, let it work well, then bottle it off with a lump of sugar in each bottle. Blackberry Wine. PUT five gallons of boiling water, to half a bushel of blackberries; let them itand forty-eight hours, then add halfa peck of floes, and ten pounds of sugar; boil all the ingredients together for an hour, work it with yeafi, and let it stand three months in the calk before you bottle it. Cherry .Wine. TAKE fifty pounds of black cherries, picked from the flalks, bruise them well, then C 95 3 then take halfa bushel of currants, and four quarts of rafberries, and squeeze them; to this quantity of juice, allow forty pounds of sugar: dissolve it in water, and put all together into a cask with eight gallons of water, and a quart of good yeaif, let it work well; you may bottle it at three months end. Curraint Wine. To three pounds of currants picked from the fialks, allow a pound of sugar, and a quart of water: boil, and put them into a cafi with a good allowance of Bri- tifh spirits; let it work for two weeks before you flop it up, then let it remain three months before you bottle it off. To make Raisin Wine. To every gallon of water, put five pounds of Malaga, or Bclvidere flit rai- finsi let them soak in the water for a fortnight, stirring them every day, then firain it through a sieve, and put it into a [ 96' a cask: to every gallon of liquor, allow a pint of French brandy; work it well, and let it remain flopped up close for for four months, before you bottle it. so make Sage Wine. BOIL twenty.fix quarts of water, with twenty-five pounds of Malagaraifins cut small; then put it into a tub with two pecks of red sage, and half a pint of yeast; let all work well, then put it into .a cask, let it remain a week before you flop it up, and two months before you bottle it up. To make Clear Wine. TAKE half a pound of hartfhorn, and dissolve it in cyder; and if it be for cyder, Rhenish wine, or any other liquor, this quantity is enough for a hogfhcad. To make Mead. To five quarts of honey, allow forty quarts of water, eighteen races of ginger, and one handfulof rolemary; boil them together 97 ] together for three hours, and ikim it per. petually: when it is cold, put your yeast to it, and it will be fit to bottle in eight or ten days. To make White Mead. TAKE three gallons of water, and one quart of honey, and if it be not firong enough, add more honey; boil it for an hour, then put it into a tub with ginger, and spice, the whites of eight eggs to it, work it well with yeast, and when you perceive it is done -working, bottle it off for use. To make Milk Punch. TAKE two quarts of milk, a quart of good brandy, the juice of fix lemons, and half a pound of sugar; mix them well, and Pfrain it through a jelly bag, take a little lemon peel, and put into your bag; when it is firained bottle it up, and it will keep a considerable time. To make Citron Azaier. TAKE a pound and a half of the belt citron bruised, nine ounces of lemon I peel, [ 98 ] peel,the fame quantity of orange peel; nutmegs bruised, a quarter of a pound; firong prooffpirits, three gallons; water two gallons; macerate, diftil and dulcify with double refined sugar, two pounds. Ratafia Cordial. TAKE three gallons of Molasses brandy, nutmegs three ounces and a half; bruise them, and infuse them in the brandy; adding ambergreafe, three grains; bitter almonds, one pound and a half: mix the ambergreafe with three pounds of fine Lisbon sugar, then infuse all for seven or eight days, and firain it off for use. Orange Flower Brandy. TAKE a gallon of French brandy, two pounds of sugar, two quarts of water, and halfa pound of orange flowers; make a syrup of your sugar and water, put in your orange flowers, and give all a gentle boil; then mix in the brandy,' and [ 99 ] and put all into a fione bottle close corked up for use. Surfeit Water. TAKE a peck of red corn poppies, put them in a large bottle, and put to it a quart of aqua vita, a nutmeg, and a race of ginger, sliced, a small flick of cinna- mon, a blade of mace, three or four figs, four ounces bs raisins of the fun, four ounces of annifeeds, caraways and car- demum, mixed with two ounces of Spanish liquorish; put all these ingredi- ents into the bottle; then add two quarts of white brandy, and cork it up; shake it every day for a week; then let itftand for two months, by which time it will be fit to drink. Cinnamon Water. TAKE cinnamon bruised, twelve ounces; proof spirits redified three gal- lons; water one gallon and a half; ma- cerate them twenty-four hours, then difil and draw offyour spirits, and dul- cify [ xIO ] cify it with loaf sugar, two pounds and a half, and make it full proof. Nutmeg Water. TAKE nutmegs bruised, twelve ounces'; prooffpirits three gallons, water one gallbn and a half; infuse, diftil, and dulcify with two pounds of sugar for use. Mint l'ater. TAKE mint two handfuls, prooffpirits two gallons'and a'half; diftil and dul- cify with sugar, one pound and a half for use. Lemon Water. TAKE twelve large lemons, sliced thin, and put them into two pints of white wine, with a little cinnamon, and a hand- ful of rofe-leaVes; the fame quantity of burrage,and a drachm of yellow sanders: sleep all this together twelve hours; mix in a pint and a half of water, two pounds of sugar, and two pints more wine, then diftil it for use. FINIS. /.* I'' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -----I