Full Citation

  • Title The complete confectioner; or, the whole art of confectionary: Forming A Ready Assistant to all Genteel Families; Giving them a Perfect Knowledge of Confectionary; with Instructions, Neatly Engraved on Ten Copper-Plates, How to decorate a Table with Taste and Elegance, Without the Expence or Assistance of a Confectioner. By a person, late an apprentice to the well-known Messrs. Negri and Witten, of Berkley-Square
  • Author Nutt, Frederick
  • Imprint London : printed for the author; and sold by J. Mathews, No. 18, Strand, MDCCLXXXIX. [1789].
  • Pages 245
  • Language English
  • Microfilm Reel # 9202
  • Physical Description xxiv,212p.,10 plates ; 8°
  • ESTC Number T90914
  • Source Library British Library
TH M COMPLETE CONFECTIONER, &c. S&. &c. [PRICE Jos. 6d.] sTHE H ''E COMPLETE CONFECTIONER; 0 R, THE WHO L ART op C ON FE C T IO N A RY: F 0 I M I N A Ready Assistant to all Genteel FAMILIES; GIVING THEM A PERFECT KNOWLEDGE or CONFECTIONARY: W 1 IT Hl I N S T R U C T IO N S, NEATLY ENGRAVED ON TEN COPPER-PLATES, How to decorate a TABLE with TASTE and ELEGANCE, 1Vithout the Expcnce or Alliftance ofa CONFECTIONER. BY A P E R S ON, Late an APPRENTICE to the well-known MlTefrs. NEC.I and VITTEN, of oELRKLEY-SQUARE. LONDON: PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR ; AND SOLD BY J. MATHEWS, NO. 18, STRAND, M DCCLXXXIX. [ Price ios. 6d. neatly bound. ] Eniterd at Stt/ionrtes Ia//. 8liKlTA\I ** Since the firlf Proposals were printed, the Author has seen a Book entitled The Confc&ioner's. and House- keeper's Affltant, written by a Mrs. Glass, which has obliged him to change the Title of his Book, left the Public Ihould confider it the fame, or some such fpuriout Produ6ion, R E F A C ) PRESA CE. tr H IL LE the paths of litera- ture, under the fofeeing guidance of afliduity and emulation, daily ac- quire new ornament and additional improvement, it is rather with fur- prise we perceive those occupations undifplayed that conduce to our immediate interefl. Whilfl we con- fider the manifest advantage that would would undoubtedly accrue to num- bers by unfolding a knowledge of Confeódionary, it appears rather ex- traordinary that the contra&ed ideas of 'felf-intereft have as yet so uni- formly taken place as to prohibit a publication on the fubje&: the vast expence attending the inftruc- tions given by those even poorly qualified, has in a great measure kept it concealed from the obfer- vation of many, whose profpets in life might turn upon a situation where it would infinitely serve: thofc unprovided females in .particular, who with to improve, and perhaps to excel, however narrow their abi- lities lities, will find in the following sheets wherewith to satisfy their desires with regard to every infor- mation in the burinefs. The opportunities the author has had, however extensive, would not have enabled him to complete his project, did he not make use of a long series of observation, connected with the clearest care and attention; the success of his hopes and expeCt- ations, must naturally depend upon the judgment and candour of his reader. Could his wish to be of ser- vice be possibly diflinguifhed il a selected point of view from the work work itself, it would screen from censure any miflake he might have unwarily fallen into; the latter however (as he has endeavoured) he hopes he has completely avoided ; for, on the most fleady reviewal, nothing appears either deficient or re- dundant. But as he has surrendered his exertions to a voluntary trial, he is happy in the consideration that he is to appear before a tribunal, where, if the effets of his labours prove fatisfadtory, he cannot possibly fail of a reward in commendation; and, if in any manner deficient, of being treated with favourable lenity. CON- ( ix ) -, CONTENTS. BISCUIT S, &c. No. i. SI N E Savoy Biscuits. 2. Fine Spunge Bicuits. 3. Orange Heart Biscuits. 4. Naples Biscuits. 5. Syringe Bifcuis. 6. Robe de Chambre Bitfciis. 7. Common Savoy Bijcuits. Ub ,No. 8. No. 8. Sweetmeat Biscuits. 9. Monkey Bifiuits.. Io. Spiee Biscuits. I. T'oad in a Hole B'icuils, 12. Alillefruit Biscuits. 13. Mafapan Bis uilts. 14. yJdges B'iscuits. 1j. 'teen's Cakes. 16. 2larmouth B uiits. 1 7. Ling's Biscuits. 1 . Chocolate BJifu'its. 19. Italian Wiater Biscuits. 20, Jia'ter Cakes with Carrawqy Seeds. 2 r. ;Frech Rifls. 22. Fine Szueelmeat Gingerbread Nuts. 23. Turlulongs, fine, for BreaXfafl. 24. Fine Shrezcfbury Cakes. 25. Lemon Bi suits. 26. The f'ay to Blanch Almonds. 2 7. French Alaccaroons. 28. Engli/hMaccaroons,commonly called Common. No. 29. No. 29. Ratifie Bifciits. 30. Orange Bijfuits. 31. Filbert Biscuits. 32. Pifachio Nut Biscuits. 33. Orange Flower Bifcuils. 34. Fine Almond Fagots. 35. Fine Ginger Cakes. 36. Frejb Apricot Bifiuits. 37. Freyh Barberry Bic-uits. 38. FrteJ Damnfon Bifcuils, or Refined CheeJe. 39. A Small Fine Almond Cake. 40. A Large Rich lTwo Guinea Cake. 4I. A Sallr Rich Seed Cake. 42. A Small Rich 'lumb Cake. W A F E R S. 43. L E MON Wafers.. 44. Barberry Wanfers. 45. Orange Walfers. b z No. 46. No. 46. Bergamot WAafers. 47. Violet YWafers. 48. Peppermint lFafers DROPS. 49. - E R GA MOT Drops. 50. Black Currant Drops. 5 . Chocolate Drops. 5z. Damon Drops. 53. Seville Orange Drops. 54. Lemon 'Drops. 55. Orange Drops. 56. Peppermint Drops. 57. k'ioet Drops. 58. L'iarley Sugar Drops. PRAWLONGS, &c. 59. L EMO N l'rawlongs. 6o. Oranae Praztlons. No. 6r. No. 6 . Pi/lachio Prawlongs, Red. 62. Burnt Filbert Prawlongs, Red. 63. Orange Flower Prawlongs. 64. Seville Orange Jum.bles. 65. Bur-nt Almonds, Red. 66. Burnt Almonds, I'/,irte. 67. Pijfachio Prawlongs, f'hite. 68. Burnt Filberts, White. 69. Merings in the Form of Eggs, 70. Almond Pafle. 71. Orgeat Paj/e. 72. Orgeat Syrup. 73. Lemon Syrup. 74. Orange Syrup. 75. Seville Orange Syrup. 76. Pine A4pple Syrup. 77. Capillaire Syrup. b 3 JEL L IE S, JELLIES, &c. No. 78. CUR RANT ell, Red and /Vhite. 79. Rafberry .elly, for Ices. o80. Apple Jelly, to put overyour Fruit, or what you like. Si . HarltJhorn Jelly. 82.. Calvesfoot Jelly. 83. Black Currant Jelly. 84. To make Blomonge. 85. GooJberry Jelly. J AM S, c. 86. RASBERRT yam. 87. Apricot Jam. 88. Strawberry Jam. 89. Barberry Jam. 9o. Peach Jam. No9. 9. ' .No. 91. Black Plumb Yam. 9z. Rajberry Cakes. 93. Seville -Orange Pafle Cakes. 94. Millefruit Rock Candy. 95. Rock Sugar of all Colours. -96. Barley Sugar. 97. The kIy to make all Sorts of Car- raway Cojfls. 98. Cardamom Confits. 99. -Carimel Crocont. oo. IYfhp, for a Trfle. 0i o. Everlafling lihipfyllabitb to put into Glafes. ioz. Floating Island. 103. Iceing for a Rich Cake. 04. To Clarify Sugar for Sweet- meats. b 4 ESSEN Cl ESSENCE for ICES. No. xo. CEDRA T Ejence. io6. Lemon E.jence. 107. Orange Ejence. WATERS, &c. for ROUTS. 108. LEMONADE. 0og. Orangeade. I Io. Currant Iaater made of Jelly. i I. Fre/h Currant Water. 112. Cedraty Water. 113. Rajberry Water, of Ra/berry Jam. II4. FreJh Rafberry Water. i i5. Bergamot Water. I16. Apricot Water. No. 117. No. 117. Strawberry Water, of Straws berry Jam. I18. Frejhl Strawberry Water. I9. Barberry Water. I 20. Peach Water. z12. Pear W/ater. 122. Cherry Water. 123. Orgeat. ICE CREAMS. 124. BARBERRT Ice Cream. 125. RaJberiy Ice Cream. 126. Strawberry Ice Cream. 127. Apricot Ire Cream. 128. Pine Applk Ice Cream. 129. Currant Ice Cream. 130. Pflachio Ice Cream. 131. Bi/iuit Ice Cream. 132. Plain Ice Cream. No. 133. No. 133. Brown Bread Ice .Cream. 134. Royal Ice Ceam. 135. Ginger Ice Cream. 136. Frelb Strawberry Ice Cream. 137. Frejf Rajberry Ice Cream. 138. Fre/3 Apricot Ice Cream. 139. Coffee Ice Cream. 140. Chocolate Ice Cream. 141. Seville Orange Ice Cream. 142. Lemon Ice Cream. 143. China Orange Ice Creamn. 144. Burnt Filbert Ice Cream. I45. Burnt Ice Cream. 46. Mfllefruit Ice Cream. I47. Fre/fl Currant Ice Cream. I48. Cedraty Ice Cream. 149. Burnt Almond Ice Cream. i 5. Parmafan Cheese Ice Cream. 15I. Dam/on Ice Cream. 12. Prunello Ice Cream. 153. Peach Ice Cream. No. 154. No. I54. Black Currant Ice Cream. 155. Cherry Ice Cream. WATER ICES, Of all Sorts. 156. BA R BE R RY ater Ice: 157. Rajberry Water Ice. I58. Strawberry aFater Ice. 159. Apricot WYater Ice. i60. Pine Apple ;/alter Ice. 6 t. Chocolate WYater ILe. 162. Seville Orange Water Ice. 163. China Orange Wider Ice. 164. Lemon Water Ice. i65. Punch Water Ice. 166. Peach Water Ice. 167. Currant Water Ice. 168. FreJh Currant Wkater Ice. 169. Frej7 Rafberty Water Ice. No. 170. No. r70. Damson Waler Ice. i 7 i. Prunello Water Ice. I 72. Black Currant Water Ice. I73. Grape Water Ice. 1 74. Cherry Water Ice. 175. Pear Akater Ice. 176. Millefruit Water Ice. 177. Bergamot LWater Ice. 178. Cedraty Water Ice. 179. Fre/h. Strawberry kaater ce. FRUITS PRESERVED I N BR ANDY. 180. APRICOTS, in Brandy. I 8. Peaches, in Brandy. 182. Morella Cherries, in Brandy. I83. lMogul Plumbs, in Brandy. No. 184. No. r84. Green Gages, in Brandy. i85. Green Orange Plumbs, in Brandy. 86. Grapes in Brandy. PRESERVED SWEETMEATS, WET. 187. GR EEN Apricots, Wet. x8 8. Apricots Ripe, Wet. 189. Preserved Pine Apple Chips, /e·t. I90. Angelica, IVet. 9Ig. Barberries in Sprigs, Wet. I92. Rafberries PWhole, WVet. 193. Currants in Bunches, 1Yhole, WPet. 194. Cebdraies IYWhole, WJYet. No. 195. No. 1 95. Cherries Sweet, in Syrup. 196. Cherries not Sweet, -Wet, or Dry. I97. Cucumbers or Gerkins, Wet. 198. Comport Golden Pippins,, .Wet. 199. Coinport Irench Pears, WF'hile, WVet. 200. Comport French Pears, Red, Wet. :oi. Damnins PWhole, Wzet. 202. Grapes in Buncsdes, Wet. 203. GooJberries in the Fborm of Hops, AVet. 204. Green Gooflerries, -1'et. 205. Lemons, b'hole, Wet. 206. Seville Oranges Whole, ;Yet. 207. Orange Peels, IWet. 208. Orange Chips, PWet. 209. Lemon Chips, Wet. 210 . Lemon Peels, Set. 2 I1. Pears, ;Vet. 212. Green Orante Plumbs, IlJet. 213. Mogul Plumbs, Wet. No. 214. No. 214. Pine Apples FlY:ole, IFWet. 2I5. A Small rellow Plumb, Wet.. 216. Strawberries YlVhole, Aciet.: 217. 4Aricot Chips, Wet. Q 18. Green Gages, fie l. DRIED FRUITS. 219. DAMSONS, Dried. 220. Mo[gul Plumbs, Dried, 221. Green Orange Pluhmbs, Dried. 222. Green Gages, Dried. 223. Pears Candied, or Dried. 224. Cherries, Sweet, Dried. 225. Cherries, not Sweet, Dried. 226. Apricot Chips, Dried. 227. Orange or Lemon Chips, Candied or Dried. 228. Angelica Knots, Dried. 229. Barberries in Bunches, Dried. 230. Lemon Peels, Candied or Dried. No. 231. No. 231. Cucumbers, Dried. 232. Green Apricots, Dried. 233. Apricots full Grown, Dried. 234. Grapes in Bunches, Dried. 235. Pine Apple Chips, Dried. 236. Cedraties, WYhole or in t arters, Dried. 237. P a/le Knots, Red, or White. T' T E ( W 1.1/14 v/AV½ J 1 . bA· 13~d1 ó17. Zyp~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~~. N ~~~~~00>~~~~~~~~e - ST) ^ K~p · leg ) I S®c· Z ~%es <cse k-- wetr~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~t2 J~~~~~~~~~~~c /~~~~~~~~~ ci4 w~~~~~~~~~~~~~t~~ (L~t) Q2 e A';Q 7-71\~~~~~~~~~~Pc ('N;·. ~ r1~~88 W S~~~~ m~ ni7 .5 1W'1/ a 1 K :) flat 8 k II) (in~oma&~s laite 9».'. . . * KJ Kr, tw \sKKKhdC i i I~~ I (Ii) /^\ ^ \(S^\-' THE Complete Confetioner. No. i. Fine Savoy Bifeuits. B REAK twelve eggs and put the yolks in a bafon, then put in twelve ounces of powdered sugar with the yolks, then ralfp the rind of four lemons, and mix and stir the rind up with the yolks and sugar, and beat them with a wooden spoon ten minutes, then whisk the whites in a copper pan, but do not leave whiik- ing them till they are almofi firong enough to bear an egg, or they will go to water and be spoiled, and when you A think think you have whilked them enough, then mix the yolks with them, with a wooden spoon as light as possible, when it is mixed well, take ten ounces of fine flour as dry as possible, and stir it up with the eggs and sugar, but not too mnuch, only till it mixes with the eggs; then take a frnall tea-spoon and take out a spoonful of the batter and pull it along the paper, and as you pull the spoon along the paper push the batter down with your finger, so as to make the bis- cuit about three inches long, and about half an inch wide; then sift some sugar over them before you put them in the oven, which must be very hot, but be careful that they are not burnt, for thty soon scorch if you do not watch them; and when they are done, cut them off the paper whilst they are hot. No. 2. No. 2. Fine Spunge Bifcuiis. T AKE three quarters of a pound of powdered sugar, and put it in a baron, and take twelve eggs and break the whites into a copper pan, and put the yolks in with sugar, and beat the sugar and yolks together with a wooden- spoon, till you fee the sugar and yolks blow up in bladders of wind; then wvhifk the whites well till they are almost fit to bear an egg on them; then mix the yolks and the sugar with the whites, with a large spoon very lightly, and stir them as little as possible, only till you fee the whites and yolks are just mixed; then take ten ounces of fine flour and mix well with the eggs; then butter the tin moulds well, before you put the batter in them, otherwise you will not get them out when they are baked, and when you have filled the tins, sift a lit- A 2 tle tie powdered sugar on the top of them, before you put them in the oven; it makes them a very fine ice: let your' oven be moderate, and when baked take them out of the tins while they are hot, for they will come out the better when hot. No. 3. Orange Heart .Bifuits. TAKE three quarters of a pound of powdered sugar, and put in a pewter ba- son, and put in thirty yolks of eggs with the sugar, and take seven preserved orange peels and pound them in a mor- tar very fine, quite to a paste, then take a handful of fwcet and half a handful of bitter almonds, and pound them very fine, and mix them with a little orange flower water; then put four eggs, yolks and whites together, and put them in the bafon with the lugar, eggs, and peel, and mix them. all well together \ ith with a wooden spoon in each hand, and beat them till you fee the batter rife very much, though you can hardly beat them too light, beat them till it turns quite white, and puffs up in blad- ders; then put in half a pound of sifted flour, and mix it with the batter very lightly ; then butter the hearts, fill them, and sift a little powdered sugar over the top of them, before you put them in the oven, which must be rather quick, but not too hot, otherwise they will not be light, and take them out of the tins while they are hot. No. 4. Naple Bifcitis. TAKE one pound and a half of Lisbon sugar, put it into a little copper saucepan, and three quarters of a pint, of wine measure, of water, in with the sugar, and one frnall cup full of orange A 3 flower flower water, and boil the sugar with the water till it is all melted; then break twelve eggs, whites and yolks together, whisk them well, then pour the Lisbon syrup boiling hot in with the eggs, and whiik them as fait you can, at the time of pouring in the syrup, or the eggs will spoil, and when you have poured it all in, keep whilking it till it is quite cold and set, and when i't is cold, take one pound and a half of flour, and mix it as light as poflible; then put two sheets of paper on the copper plate you bake on, then take one sheet of paper, and make the edges of it fland up about an inch and a half high, and pour your bat- ter in it, sift tome powdered sugar over it, and put it in the oven, and attend it carefully, to prevent its burning, on the top; do not leave the oven one minute; when you think it is near baked enough; and when bakcd, take it out in the pa- Cer, per, and let it stand till cold, then turn it over, and wet the bottom of the paper, till the paper comes off with ease, then cut it to what size you like: you may bake it in small tins if you please. No. 5. Syringe Biscuits. T AKE one pound of sweet almonds, and pound them im a marble mortar very fine with whites of eggs, but be careful not to make them too wet with the eggs, only just wet enough to pre- vent the almonds from getting oily, and when you find they get rather dry, then put another white of an egg in them, and pound them so fine, till you can scarce feel the least lump of an almond in it; then rasp the rind of fix lemons very fine, and put in two pounds and a half of powdered sugar, and mix the fu- gar, almonds, and the peel altogether as a A 4 pale ; paste; then take a syringe mould made of copper, about twelve inches long, and about two inches wide, made round, and to screw off at the bottom, with a little round copper plate, the size of the inside of the syringe with a little hole cut in the middle of it, in the flape of a flar, and the mould muff have two handles about the middle of it; * then roll your pafle to half fill your mould; then take a rammer of wood the thickness of the mould, put it over the pafle and squeeze it out againfi your breast upon the dref- ser, which muff be floured a little, so as not to flick, and it will come out at the bottom of the mould, then cut it in pieces about three inches long, and join them in rings, and put three sheets of paper under them, before you put them into the oven, otherwise they will burn, for your oven must be very brilk. See plate X. No. 6. HPate 10 i19 i "I I . _ i No. 6. Robe de Chambre Biscuits. . T AKE syrup of sugar, and boil it over a brisk charcoal fire, till it comes to carimile, then have some jordan al- monds ready, and put theni into the carimile sugar, stir them up with a large wooden spoon over and over, till you fee they are covered with sugar and dry, then throw them into a wooden sieve, and pick them that flick together and break them off, then make some iceing with whites of eggs and powdered sugar, and a little orange flower water, and put the almonds into the iceing, and fee them well covered with it, then put two Sheets of paper on the plate, and put your biscuits at a convenient distance from each other, so as not to touch; let the oven be moderate to colour finely the iceing, and when they come out, let them them stand till they are cold, before you take them off the papers. No. 7. Common Savoy Biscuits. BREAK fix eggs in a little copper fauceipan, with half a pound of powdered sugar, whiik the eggs and sugar very light, keep whisking them half an hour; then mix half a pound of sifted flour with the eggs and sugar with a wooden spoon; then take a tea-spoon, and one spoonful of batter and pull it along the paper, and as you pull the spoon along the paper, push the batter down with your finger, io as to make the biscuit about three inches long, and abourt half an inch wide; then sift tome sugar over them, before you put them in the oven, vwhich mull be very hot, but be careful that tliey are not burnt, for they soon Icorch if you .do not watch them, and and when they are done, cut them off the paper whilst they are hot, &c. No. 8. Sweetmneat Biscuits. TAKE some Naples biscuits that have been baked, and cut them in fniall pieces, about an inch and a half square, and about one inch thick, and lay them on your wire, and put them in the oven jult to crisp them, then make some iceing with whites of eggs, and sugar and orange flower water, and dip one fide of the biscuit in it; then cut rome fwectmcats in small pieces, such as le- mon and orange peel, and angelico, and just throw over the top of them, put them on your wire: you need no paper under them, ihen put them in the ovent to harden the iccing, and they are done. No. 9. No. 9. Monkey Biscuits. TAKE fix eggs and break the whites and yolks separate, and mix the weight of fix eggs of powdered sugar with the yolks, and beat them well together, then put the whites in a copper pan, and whisk them well, and put a little cina- mon pounded in. with the yolks and sugar, then mix the yolks and sugar with the whites; then take four eggs and the weight of them of sifted flour, then mix and stir them altogether; tlen lay three or four sheets of paper on your plate you bake on; and take a tea Ipoonful of batter, and put it on the upper sheet of paper, then make them round and about the size of a half crown piece, and join two of them together with the spoon; and sift a little powder- ed sugar over them, and put them in the oven, watch them for they are not long a baking a baking, and when they come out, cut them off the paper while they are hot, and put the two under fides of them together. No. i o. Spice Bifuits. T AKE three pounds of flour; and three pounds of fwect almonds cut in. half, and put them with the flour and three ounces of spice, such as cinnamon and mace pounded, and one pound of powdered sugar, and mix them altogether on your dresser, then take three pounds of Lisbon sugar, and put it in a saucepan with some water and just boil it, and then mix it with the reit of the ingre- dients on the dresser, and when it is all mixed to a paste, heat your oven very hot, and put three papers next your plate, then roll your pafle to the size of a large rolling pin ; then put it on your paper, paper, and flat it down with your hand about three inches wide, but higher in the middle than at the ends, then put them in the oven, and when they are baked take them out while hot, cut them with a flarp knife, about the eighth part of an inch thick, in the form of a rusk, and you will fee the almonds look very well cut in them. No. I . Toad in a ]Jole Biscuits. TAKE one pound of sweet, and one ounce and a half of bitter almonds, and pound them in a mortar very fine with water, then one pound and a quarter of Lisbon sugar, and mix it very well with the almonds: do not make it too thin, and remember there are no eggs in this, then put one flhet of paper on your wire, and rome \n wafr paper on that, then take a spoon and make your bis- cuits cults round on the wafer paper, about the size of a half crown piece; then put one or two dried cherries in the middle of them; and sift some powdered fugat over them, and put them in the oven, which must have a moderate heat, and when they come out, cut the wafer paper round them, but leave the paper at the bottom of them. No. 2. Millefruit Bificitis. TA AKE a quarter of a pound of pre- served orange peel and cut it in pieces about half an inch long, and not quite a quarter wide; then take fix ounces of angelico, cut it the fame way, and a .quarter of a pound of preserved lemon peel, and fix ounces of sweet, and one ounce of bitter almonds, and let all there be cut the f.ime way as ihe orange peel, and put some whites of eggs, iliar, and oralnge orange flower water in a bafon, and- make an iceing; then put all these into it, and paper your plate with three papers, and make them what size you chufe, then take a little brufl and touch them here and there with a little cochineal colour, it will make them look well : let your oven not be too hot, only just to dry the iceing, as it will flick to- gether well, let them be cold before you take them off, and they will be like a piece of a rock, &c. No. 13. Mafapan Buifcuits. TAKE one pound of sweet almonds and pound them very fine, so fine, that you can scarce feel the least lump, you may use water to them; then take one pound of powdered sugar, and put the almonds and sugar in a clean saucepan, and have a clear charcoal fire, but not fierce ; fierce; stir them together over the fire> with a wooden spoon, till the paste leaves the pan and keeps itself together, but keep stirring it all the time, and be careful that it does not burn to the pan; put it on a dreftfr with a little flour under it, and work it up well with your hands till it hangs well together; then roll finall pieces of it about three inches long and about half the thickness of your little finger, join the ends of them, and make them in round rings; put theni on the back of a wooden sieve, and put them in a stove or any dry place where there is some warmth to come to them, let them flay two or three days till they are quite hard, and when you want to bake them, take about eight whites of eggs, and put in a baron, tix some powdered sugar with them, and with a wooden spoon iii each hand beat it well; put a cup full of B orange orange flower water in it beat well:; add more powdered sugar to it if there is occasion, to make it a proper thick- ness, and beat it about a quarter of an hour till you fee it puff up and rife; take a wire and put your biscuits in this iceing in the bafon, and take them out and turn them inside down with your finger on this wire, and let the iceing run through this wire into an- other bafon until you fee your rings quite through, then lay three sheets of paper on the plate, let the oven be very flow, and put them in, only until the iceing is set and they begin to change colour, then take them out and let them fland till they are cold before you take them off. No. I4. yudges Biscuits. T AKE fix eggs and break them into a copper pan, )olks and whites togc- th er, ther, whisk them well for about five mi nutes, mix half a pound of powdered sugar with the eggs, and whisk them for ten minutes, put as many carraway feeds as you think proper, and half a pound of sifted flour, mix it well with a wooden spoon, and put three papers on your plates; then take a spoon and drop them on papers about the size of a crown piece, sift some powdered sugar over them, let them be rather thick in the middle, and the oven rather sharp, and when they come out, cut them off the paper while hot. No. 15. sucen Cakes. T.,AKE one pound of the best butter, and rub it well with your hand in the preserving pan until it is as fine as cream, then take twelve eggs, yolks and whites together and whisk them well in 13 z another another pan over a gentle fire, mind they do not burn, for they will without great care; take twelve ounces of powdered sugar, and put with the eggs, keep whisking them for three minutes, put the eggs and the sugar over the fire again and whisk them, and be careful it does not burn at bottom, when it is pretty warm take it off and whisk it till it is cold, then mix it well with your hand; take one pound of sifted flour, and twelve ounces of currants well picked and washed, mix them well with the reft, butter-your tin hearts, and put them on your plate, with three or four papers under them, your oven must be quick, but if you find it too hot *for the top put a sheet of paper over them to keep them from burning. No. 16. No. 16. 2armouth Biscuits. TAKE fix ounces of currants, wash and pick them very clean, dry them well, rub a little flour among them to make them white, and put half a pound of powdered sugar with the currants up- on a clean dreffir; add twelve ounces of flour siftcd, and halfa pound of the belt frefhl butter you can get; break three eggs, and mix all the ingredients to- gether to become a paste, that you can roll it on the drcffer, the thickness of an eighth part of an inch, and then cut them out either round or what shape you fancy. N. B. Your oven mufl be rather hot, and put two or threc ihccts of paper under tlem, do not bake them too much, only just make them brown. B 3 No. 17. No. 17. Kings Biscuits. TAKE half a pound of butter and work it about in a baron with a wooden spoon, then take fix eggs and whilk them well; put half a pound of pow- dered sugar in them and whisk them about ten minutes; mix the eggs and sugar with the butter, then take fix ounces of currants well waflied, and put them with the eggs, and fix ounces of flour and mix it well altogether, put three fleets of paper on the plate, take a tea-.spoon and drop the pafle on the paper about the size of a shilling, put them in a flarp oven, and cut them off while they are hot. No. 18. Chocolate Bifeuiis. T AIKE a quarter of a pound of cho- colate, and put it on a tin, over a flove to to make it warm, then put a pound of powdered sugar in a bafon, and when the chocolate is quite warm and soft, put it, in with the sugar, and mix it well with about eight whites of eggs, if you find it too thin, mix more powdered sugar with it just to bring it to a paite, so that you can roll it in lumps as big as walnuts: let your oven be moderate, put three papers under them, let the oven just raise them and make them crisp and firm, and let them be quite cold before you take them off the pa- per. No. 9. Italian }Eater Biscuits. T AKE fix eggs and break them, put the yolks and whites in a copper pan with the weight of the fix eggs of powdered sugar, whilk them well for half an hour: take fix more eggs nnd B 4 the the weight of them of sifted flou-r mix it with them,. cut a piece of wood about the lize of the top of a large breakfast cup, but not thicker than the eighth of an inch, in the form of a round ring, with a piece project- ing from it to hold by as a handle; take a table spoonful of the batter, and with a large knife fprcad it to the thickness of the wood until the ring is filled up; lay your knife on the paper close to the wood, and lift the wood up, and you will fee your cake on the pa- per : put as many of them on the paper as you can without touching each other; let your oven be vcry hot, and they will be baked in five minutes, but take care they do not burn at bottom; when they are done let thelm land until they are quite cold, then wet the other fide of the paper and they will come off' cafily, put Put them into the oven afterwards, to dry crisp. No. o2. Water Cakes with Carraway Seeds' TAKE three pounds of powdered ft> gar and four pounds of sifted flour, mix the flour and sugar together on a clean dresser with half water and half whites of eggs, and as many carraway feeds as you think proper, mix all together so as to make it a very fine paste, that you can roll it on the dresser and the thinner the better, cut out the shape you like with a tin cutter; round and scolloped is the general fashion, but vary the fliape to your own fancy, roll them very thin and they will be the crisper, for if they are not crisp they are not worth eating; put them on a sheet of paper and rather a flow oven, and if you think it too hot, put as many fliects sheets of paper as you think fit to pre- vent them from being burnt, bake them very little so as just to change the colour of them, and butter that sheet of paper you put them on that they may come off easily. No. 21. French Ryk-s. T A K E a clean copper pan and break into it as many eggs as the yolks will make the weight of a pound, use no white in this ingredient, take one pound and a half of powdered sugar and put in with the yolks of eggs, with a large wooden spoon stir them up well to- gether about ten minutes, put in three handfuls of carraway feeds, and two pounds of flour and mix all together, roll your paste on a clean dreflcr in a roll about fourteen inches long and the thickness of a large rolling pin, paper paper your plate with three iheets of paper besides the lieets your paste is on, lay the paste in a long roll on the paper, and flat it down with your hand, let it be about one inch high in the middle of the paste, and flat it down toward the edges, rather to a point, and after they are baked, wet the pa- per that they may come off whilst they are warm, and be careful not to bake them too much, or they will not cut without breaking, then with a sharp knife, cut them about a quarter of an inch thick, in the form of a rusk, and lay them flat on the wire, and put them into the oven so as ro make them crisp ·and dry, and they are done. No. 22. Fine Sweetmeat Gingerbread Nuts. TA AKE two pounds of the best trea- cle and put it in a large balbn; then take take half a pound of the best fre-sh butter, and carefully melt it, not to oil, pour the butter to the treacle, and stir it well as you. pour it in; add three quarters of an ounce of the best pounded ginger, and put in with it, two ounces of preserved lemon and orange peel cut very friall; and two ounces of preserved angelica, likewise cut very small; and one ounce of corri- ander feed pounded, and one ounce and a half of carraway feeds whole, mix them well together; then break two eggs, yolks and whites together, and mix as much flour as will bring it to a fine pasec; make them the fizc you choose, put them on the bare tin plate, and let your oven be rather brisk. Nto. 23. *No. 23. Tuirtulongs, fine, for Breakfalt. TAKE a quarter of a pound of but- ter, three ounces of powdered sugar, one pound and a half of flour, fix eggs, yolks and whites together, and a very lit- tle salt, and mix them altogether on your dresser, and have a preserving pari on the fire, with clean boiling water in it, roll your batter out about four inches long, and almost as thick as your little finger, join it in two round rings the two ends of them, and put them in this boiling water, not too many at a time, then on the other fide, have a baron with cold water, and as the bis- cults swim on the top of the boiling water, take them out, put them in the cold water, and let them lie all night; take them out next morning and put them into a ficvc, and drain all the water water from them; put them on your plate, without any paper under them, let your oven be very hot, and watch them, and you will fee them rife very much, the more they rife the better, fee they are not burnt, but let them be of a fine brown, and then take them out. 'No. 24. Fine Shrew/bury Cakes. TA K E a pound of butter, and put it in a little flat pan, rub it till it is as fine as cream; then take one pound of powdered sugar, a little cinnamon and mace pounded, and four eggs, yolks and whites together: beat them with your hand till it is very light; then take one pound and a half of sifted flour, work it together, and roll it on your drcfler, to what size you like, only very t:it, let your ovcn be rather flow, and let let them change their colour, then take them out. No. 25; Lemon Biscuits. TAKE one pound of sweet almonds, and pound them very fine in a mortar, .and whites of eggs with them, be care- ful to temper them properly, to pre- vent the almonds from turning to oil, and pound them to a very' fine palte.; put in three pounds of powdered sugar, and mix it well ; take ten lemons, rasp the rinds of them very fine, and mix it with the almonds and sugar.; when they are all well mixed, take a knife; and a small piece of board in your hand, and try to drop off the pafle on a sheet of paper, about half the size of a nutmeg, and round, put them at a convcnient diflance from .each other, and put them in the oven, iwhich which if you find too hot, put three of four sheets of paper, or more at bottom, as occasion shall require under your biscuits, to prevent their scorching, when tfiey comne out of the oven, let them stand till they are quite cold, and they will come off the paper very easily. No. 26. The P;!'y to Blanch Alimonds. FOR all biscuits that arc made with almonds, the almonds must always be blanched, and for every thing else, except it is particularly mentioned to the con- trary, and the quickcef way of blanching them, is this; viz. put a pan of water on the fire and let it boil, then put the almonds in for about ten minutes, drain the water from them, put them on a dresser and rub them as hard as you can with both your hands, and when you think they arc almost blanch- cd ed, take a butcher's tray and put thenm in, and holding each end of the tray fan them up and down till you fee al- most all the skins are gone over, then lay them on the dresser again, and those that are not blanched do them with your fingers, and fan them again; and when they are done keep them very dry or else they will get four. No. 27. French zraccaroons. T AKE one pound of sweet almonds and pound theni very fine in a mortar, with whites of eggs, and be careful they donot oil; then take three pounds of pow- dered sugar and mix with the almonds and whites of eggs to a fine thick- ness, so as to come off the spoon well; then put three flects of paper on your plate, and with a table spoon drop them off at a little distance from each other C so so as not to touch, put them in rather a brilk oven, but mind they do not burn, bake them of a very fine brown colour and crisp; then let them 1tand till they are cold., before you take them off, but if they are burnt at bottom, they will not come off at all, so that you must be very careful of them. No. 28 Engli I Maccaroons commonly called Common. TAKE one pound of sweet almonds, and pound them in a mortar with a gill of water, and the reft whites of eggs according to the pounding of them, not too wet nor too dry, but you need not pound these almonds quite so fine as for the French maccaroons.; then add one pound of the best Lisbon sugar, and mix it well with your almonds; then. rake a wire, and lay one .leet of paper on on the wire, take some Iheets of wafer paper, join them, and lay them on the paper that is on the wire, put your paste in a bafon, take a table Spoonful of the paste, and drop it off the spoon; sift some powdered sugar, over them; let your oven be pretty quick, but do not bake them much, only till the tops are of a fine brown, for these biscuits must be rather moist when eaten; when they are done, take them out, and cut the. wafer paper off round them, but mind and leave the wafer paper at bottom of them, and round the fides of them. No. 29. Ratifie Biscuits. TAKE half a pound of sweet al- monds, and half a pound of bitter al- monds, and potnd, them in a mortar very fine, with whites.of eggs; put three pounds of powdered sugar, mix it well C 2 with with the whites of eggs, to the proper thickness into a bafon; put two or three fleets of paper, on the plate you bake -on; take your knife, and the fpaddle made of wood, and drop them on the paper, let them be round, and about the size of a large nutmeg; put them in the oven, which mufl be quick, let them have a fine brown, and all a like, but be careful they are not burnt at bottom, else they will not come off the paper when baked: let them be cold before you take them off. No. 30. Orange Bifiuits. TA K E one pound of sweet almonds, pound them in a mortar very fine with whites of eggs; take ten china oranges, rasp the rind off them very fine, and put it with the almonds; add three pounds of powndercd sugar, and mix it well, Well, if you find it too thick, put more whites of eggs to it and mix it well; then put two or three iheets of paper under, beside that you have put them on: let your oven have a moderate heat; drop little round pieces of paste on your paper, about half as big as a nut- meg, and put them in the oven: let them have a fine brown, and take them off when cold. No. 3 I. Filbert Biscuits. T AKE some Barcelona filbert nuts, and put them in a mortar to break the shells, pick all the ihells from them clean, pound them in a mortar very fine, and mix whites of eggs with them; take care they do not oil; mix three pounds of powdered sugar, with the nuts and whites of eggs to a proper thick- ncfs, lct your oven have a moderate C 3 heat, heat, then with the fpaddle and khife, drop small pieces, the fame size as the orange and lemon biscuits ; and put two or three sheets of paper under them, let them be a fine brown, and all alike, and let them be cold before you take them off the paper. No. 3. Piflachio Nut Bifruis. TAKE halfa pound of piflachio nuts and blanch them, pound them in a mor- tar very fine; mix whites of eggs, and one pound of powdered sugar in a ba- -on, break sixteen eggs, and put the whites of them in a copper pan, whisk them very firong, fit to bear an egg on them, put the yolks with the sugar and pifiachio nuts, beat them well with a spoon in each hand, mix the sugar, yolks and pifchio nuts, with the whites very lightly, then put one pound and a quarter quarter of flour, as lightly as possible; butter your fpunge tins, and put the paste in: sift some powdered sugar over them; before you put them in the oven, let the heat be moderate, and put three papers under the tins : do not let your biscuits be burnt, but of a fine colour, and take them out of the tins while they are hot. No. 33. Orange Flower Bificuits. TAKE powdered sugar, what quan- tity you choose, and put as much white of eggs, as will make the sugar of a thick paste; pick some orange flowers, and mix as many as you like, in pro- portion to your quantity of sugar, and whites of eggs, in a baron, so as to be thick enough to roll in little lumps, about the size of a walnut; let your oven be rather flack or moderate; put three papers between them and the tin C 4 plate, plate, put them in the oven, let them rife to a very light brown, and take them off when cold. No. 34. Fine Almond Faggots. C U T some sweet almonds in halves, put them and some whites of eggs in a bafon together; put a little powdered sugar, to make the almonds flick to- gether, mix them well together in a bafon; put tome wafer papers on your wire, make the almonds up in little heaps with your fingers, as big as you please; sift a little powdered sugar over them, before you put them in the oven, let them be a little brown, and then take them our, and cut the wafer paper off round them, that is ragged, and leave the wafcr paper at the bottom of them. No. 3, No. 35. Fine Ginger Cakes. TA KE four pounds of flour, and put on your dresser; then take a copper fauccpan, and break fix eggs, and mix them well with a spoon; put one pint of cream in them, and beat them well, put the saucepan over the fire, and stir it till it is jus warm; put two pounds of but- ter into the cream and eggs; and one pound of powdered sugar, and stir it over a very flow fire, just to melt all the butter ; put in four ounces of pounded ginger, and when all the butter is melted, pour it all into the middle of the flour, mix it as well as you can, and when you have made it a fine paste, roll it out with flour under it, on your dresser, cut them to the size of the top of a brcakfaft cup, and a quarter of an inch thick; put three papers under them, before you put put them in the oven, which mnuft be very hot. N. B. These are very good for the itomach in cold weather. No. 36. Freh .Apricoi Bifcitis. TLAKE some of the ripest apricots, and put them in an earthen jar, in a copper pot; fill the pot up with water round the jar, cover the jar over very close, put it over the fire, and let it fim- mer for four or five hours, and then take the apricots, cut and put them in a sieve till next morning, pass them through the sieve with your hand: to every two pounds of jam, put five pounds of powdered sugar, and beat it well to- gether with two spoons; then break into it eight whites of eggs, whilk them very itrong, and mix them with the jam ; fill your paper moulds, and put them iln in the hot flove, and do the fame as you will fee in the receipt of the barberry biscuits, and put them in a dry box. No. 37. FreJh Barberry BiRfuits. T A K E your barberries, and put them in the oven; pass them through a sieve, and allow to every two pounds of bar- berries, five pounds of powdered sugar, sifted through a lawn sieve; mix the sugar with the barberries; break four eggs, put the whites in a copper pan,and whisk them very strong, mixing them with the jam; glaze some thick white paper, cut it in small pieces, and make them in small square boxes, commonly called coffins; put the jam in as smooth as possible, and put them in a sieve; then put them in your ftovc, and let them be in fix or eight days; when they arc dry, tear the paper off them, put them them in your papered boxy and keep them dry. No. 38. FreJ3 Dan/on Bifuits, or Refined Cheese. TAKE some fine damsons, and put them in a brown earthen pan ; put them in the oven, and let them be, till you find that all the flins will come off, and that the damsons are quite baked through; then take them out, skin and fione them, pass them through a sieve with a spoon ; put five pounds of pow- dered sugar to every two pounds of jam, add five whites of eggs whisked very firong, mix them well with the jam and sugar; put them in paper moulds, as you do the barberry bilcuits; let them be in the flove five or fix days, when dry, take the paper off, and put them in your dry box. No. 39. No. 39. A Small Fine Almond Cake. T A KE fix ounces of powdered sugar, and put it into a bafon; then take five eggs, and put the yolks with the sugar; add fix ounces of almonds, half bitter, and half fvvect, pound the almonds very fine in a mortar with the white of an egg or two, put them in with the yolks and sugar, beat them well with a wooden ftoon, whisk the whites very firong in the copper pan, mix the yolks and the reft with the whites, as light as possible, and take two ounces of flour, sifted very fine, and mix it with the reft: paper the heap that you mean to bake it in, with three papers double on the inside of the heap, and four at bottom; let your oven be very brisk, and before you put it in, rift a little powdered sugar over the top of it, if you find after it has been in the oven oven a little time, that it is too hot for it on the top, put one or two sheets of paper on the top of the cake, to pre-' vent its scorching. They will not take above half an hour baking, if your -oven is proper for them. No. 40. A Large Rich iTwo Guinea Cake. TAKE a large flat copper perferving pan; then take four pounds of the best fresh butter and rub the butter very fine; take another large copper pan and break fifty four eggs, whiiking them ten minutes; put four pounds of pow- ·dered sugar, and whisk the eggs and sugar together over the fire, till you find it pretty warm, take it off, and whilk it till cold, mix it well with the butter, with your hand, and put in an ounce of mace and cinnamon pounded, and two glasses of brandy : cut two pounds of lemon and orange Iorange peel, and citron, and one pound of sweet almonds; take five pounds and three quarters of flour, and sift it, put in half of it, then take four pounds of clean currants and put in. N. B, When you have put half your -flour in, then add a quarter of a pound of bitter almonds, pounded with a little powdered sugar, just to keep them from oiling, put the reft of the flour in, and paper your large heap, putting four .heets withinfide, and at bottom, and' let your oven be very brisk, No. 4r. A Small Rich Seed Cake. BREAK fourteen eggs into a copper pan, whiik shem ten minutes; then take one pound of butter, and rub it welt with your hand to a cream; put one; pound of powdered sugar to the eggsr and whink them over the fire three mib nutes, nutes, then whilk them till they are cold; afterwards mix them with the butter, with your hand as light as you can; put two or three handfuls of carravway feeds in, and some sweet almonds cut; and a lit- tle-cinnamon and mace; mix one pound and a quarter of flour, as light as you can with your hand: put three papers with inside your heap, and four or five at bottom, and let your oven be rather brisk; when you find your cake has risen, and the oven too hot at the top, cover. it with a sheet of paper, and it will be done in about an hour and a half, or two hours at farthest. 5No. 42. A SmallRich Plumb Cake. T AKE one pound and fix ounces of currants, wash and pick them very clean, then dry them, and rub a little flour wvith them, to make them all white; i»4*a~~ ' take take one pound of butter, and put it in- ,to a copper perferving pan, rub it with your hand quite to a cream; take ano- ther pan, and break sixteen eggs, yolks .and whites together, whisk them about ten minutes; take one pound of pow- dered sugar, put it in with the eggs, whisk them well over the fire, and be careful it does not burn at bottom; make the whisk go to the bottom, and when you feel they arc warm, take it off.; whisk them till they are quite cold; be- .fore you put them to the butter, mix them well with the butter with your hand, put the pound and fix ounces of currants in with it; put in one pound and a quarter of four, and mix it with the reft; add half a pound of citron and lemon and orange peel cut in it; and a handful of sweet almonds cut; and a handful of bitter almonds pound- cd with a little powdered sugar; half D an an ounce of cinnamon and mace pound- ed and a glass of brandy; then paper your hoop, put your cake in the oven, and let it be of a regular heat. No. 43. Lemon 7Wafers. AKE fix lemons, and squeeze into an earthen pan; pound and lift some double refined sugar and mix it with the lemon juice; put one white of an egg in with it, and mix it up well to- gether with your wooden spoon, to make it of a fine thickness; take some sheets of wafer paper, and put one iheet of it on a pewter sheet, or tin plate, put a spoonful on, and cover the iheet of wafer paper all over with your knife; cut it in twelve pieces, and put them across a flick in your hot flove, with that fide the paile is on uppermost, and you will find they will curl; when they are half half curled, take them off very carefully and put them up endways in a sieve, that they may stand up; let them be in the hot fiove one day, and you will find they will be all curled, and then they are done. No. 44. Barberry Wafers. BARBERRY wafers are made the fame way as your lemon wafers, only when you have made as many lemon wafers as you want, mix a little cochi- neal with the reft of the paste, to make it of a fine pink colour, and if it ihould too thin, put a little powdered sugar with it, and dry them the fame way as the lemons. I) No. 45. No. 45. Orange 1Wafers. TAKE fix china oranges, and rasp the rind of them very fine, cut them in halves, and squeeze them into a little pan; take three lemons, and squeeze them in with the orange juice and the rind; add tome powdered sugar sifted through a lawn sieve, and make it of the fame thickness as you do for your lemon wafers, and dry them the fame way with wafer paper. No. 46. Bergamot WYafers. SQUEEZE fix lemons into a little pan; mix with them some double re- fined powdered sugar sifted through a lawn sieve, so as to make it of the fame thickness as your lemon wafers; add some efience of bergamot, and mix it well well with one white of an egg; beat it till you fee it is very white; if you find it grow too thick, squeeze one more le- mon in, and mind you do not make it too strong of the essence of bergamot, for if you do, it will become bitter, and not pleasant to taste; then do them the fame way as your lemon wafers. No. 47. Miolet Wafers. T AKE fix lemons, and squeeze thenx into a little pan; add some fine powdered sugar sifted through a lawn sieve, and mix it with the juice, till it is as thick as your lemon wafers; put some ei'ene of violets, and mind you get your offence very strong; put a little blue colour, so as to make it a very fine colour; if you find it too thin, put a little more sugar into it, then spread it on the wafer paper, as your lemon wafers. D 3 No. 48. No. 48. Peppermint Wafers. TAKE fix lemons, and squeeze them into a little pan; add some very fine sugar and one white of an egg, and beat it very well, so as to make it very white; put some of the firongeft oil of peper- mint into it, so as to make it ilrong enough to your palate, then do them the fame as your lemon wafers. No. 49. Bergamot Drops. POUND and sift some sugar very fine; squeeze four or five lemons, and mix the juice and the sugar together with a wooden spoon ; drop about twen- ty drops of efience of bergamot into it, and mix it well with your spoon; stir it over the fire three or four minutes, drop them off your knife about the size of the orange orange and lemon drops, and make them as round as you can, let them fland till cold, and they will come off well; they muff be dropt on writing paper. No. 50. Black Currant Drops, GET half a sieve of black currants, and put them in a pan; mash them with your fpaddle, and put them over the fire; bring them just to a boil and pass them through a sieve over an earthen pan, put what jelly comes from them in an ear- then pipkin, and put it over the fire and let it boil for two hours, stir it all the time at bottom with your fpiaddle, or else it will burn ; put in two pounds and a half of powdered sugar, mix it with the jam and stir it over the fire half an hour, drop it on pewter sheets or plates, in little drops from your knife, and put them in your hot flove, let them 1) + be be there fill you find that they are quiteP dry, and then take them off with your knife. No. 5 1. Chocolate Drops. TAKE one pound and a half of cho- colate, put it on your pewter sheet or plate, and put it in the oven just to warm the chocolate; then put it into a copper stewpan, with three quarters of a pound of powdered sugar, mix it well over the fire, take it off, and roll it in size of small marbles, put them on white paper, and when they are all on, take the sheet of paper by each corner, and lift it up and down, so that the paper may touch the table each time, and by that means you will fee the drops come quire flat, about the size of a sixpence; put tome sugar nonpareils over them, and cover all that is on the paper, and then the chocolate drops are coveted: with the sugar nonpareils; let them stand till cold, and they will come off well, and then put them in your box papered. No. 52. Damson Dropsn. PU T some damsons in the oven tao bake but not so much as to break, then Ikin and stone them, and pass thenm through a sieve; sift some common loaf sugar through a lawn sieve, and mix with thein, make it very thick, drop them off your knife on paper, put them in your stove to dry: when they are quite dry, turn them on a sieve, and wet the outside of the paper, and they will come off easily; put them into the stove again till they are quite dry and hard, and then put them by in your papered box. No. 53. No. 53. Seville Orange Drops. TwI I S is the fame fort of paste as your Seville orange patle cakes are made of, only drop them off your knife ort your plate, then put them in your hot tove, and when they are fit,. take them off with a knife, turn them upside down- on a sieve, and put them in the itove again for a day; then paper your box and put them in. No. 54. Lemon Drops. S Q U E E Z E the juice of fix lemons into a brown pan or bafon, take some double refined sugar, pound and sift it through a very fine lawn sieve; mix it with the lemon juice and make it so thick that you can hardly flir it; put it into a copper tfew pan, with a wooden £spoon fir it over the fire five minutes; then then take it off and drop them off the point of a knife, of the fame size with the orange drops, and let thenmftand till cold, and they will come off the paper. N. B. If you wait for their cooling, put them out in some cold place: they must be dropt on writing paper. No. 55. Orange Drops. R A S P fix china oranges very fine, squeeze them in a small pan or bafon with the rind; squeeze two lemons with them, without rasping the rind, sift some powdered sugar and mix with the juice, make it of a fine thickness, put it over the fire in a small flew pan, and with a wooden spoon turn it for five minutes, then take it off the fire, and drop them off the point of a knife, as round as you can upon white paper, about the size of a silver two pence; let them them Hand till they are cold, and they will come off; then put them in your box. No. 56. Peppermint Drops. SQUE EZE three or four lemons into a bafon, and mix some powdered sugar with the'juice, the sugar must be sifted through a lawn sieve; make it of a proper thickness, and put some oil of peppermint in with it, as much as you think proper to your palate; make it of a proper thickness with sugar, put it in a sauce pan and dry it over the fire, stirring it with a wooden spoon for five minutes, then drop them off a knife on your writing paper, the fame size as the last receipt mentions, and let them Rand till they are cold, and they will come off easily, then put them in your papered box. No. 57. No. 57. iolet Drops. SQU E E Z E fix lemons, mix with them some powdered sugar sifted very fine; put into it two large spoonfuls of essence of violets and some blue colour, just enough to make it of a fine blue, viz. a little Prussian blue, pounded and mixed with a little gum water; mix all well together, and dry it over the fire, the fame as the others, and drop them off a knife on paper the size of the others; let them stand till cold, do not make it too thin, before you put it over the fire to dry; when they are cold, put them in your papered box. No. 58. Barley Sugar Drops. THESE are made the fame way as we make the barley sugar, only when boiled boiled put the rind of one or two lemons in rasped, and drop the syrup on the marble in little round drops as big as a ihilling; let .them fland till cold, then put them up in papers, and as you take them off the marble have some powered sugar, at the fide of you, to put them in. No. 59. Lemon Prawlongs. T A K E some lemons, and peel the rind off in four quarters; take all the white off from the inside of the rind; cut the yellow rind in pieces, about one inch long and about the tenth part of an inch wide; have a pan of boiling syrup on the fire, and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel, then put the praw- longs in, and stir them very much with a large wooden spoon till they are cold; put them in a large sieve, and Ihake them them just to let the sugar that does not flick to them go through the sieve; lafily .put them in your box, and keep them in a dry place, No. 60. Orange Prawlongs. A K E china oranges, and peel the rind off in four quarters; take all the white off from the inside of the rind , .cut the yellow rind in pieces about one inch long, and about the tenth part of an inch wide; have a pan of boiling syrup on the fire, and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel; put the praw- longs in, and stir them very much with a large wooden spoon till they are cold; then put them in a large sieve, and ihake them, just to let the sugar that does not flick to them go through the sieve; put them in your box, and keep them in a dry place. No. 61. No. 6 r. Piflachio Prawlongs, Red. T A K E tome piflachio kernels, and have a preserving pan on the fire with syrup; boil it till it comes almost to ,carimel, put some cochineal in and the nuts; and stir them; when they come .off the fire break them apart, let them have two coats of sugar, and fee that they are of a fine colour, and do every thing according to the receipt of the burnt ahnonds. No. 62. Burnt Filbert Prawlongs, Red. T A K E some barcelona nuts and crack them, put the kernels into a cop- per pan or iheet, and put them in the oven to roast; have a pan with fy- rup boiling, and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel; put a little cochineal in a cup, when the sugar is boiled, add it it'to it and the filberts, and stir them very much with a large wooden spoon, till you find the sugar is got hard round them; put them in a sieve, and separate them which stick together; have another pan, with syrup in and boil it as before, and ashligh' put the fame quantity of cochineal in, and mix them as before, because the second time you do them, the finer the colour will be, then put them in your box. No. 63. Orange Flower Prawlongs. TA K E orange flowers, pick the leaves asunder from each other, and fee that they are quite dry; have a preserving pan with syrup on the fire and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel, then put your orange flowers in; stir them well with a large spoon, continue the stiring till they are cold, then put them in a E fievc, sieve, and sift them, till you fee the powder of the sugar all gone, then put them in your box, but.do not put them in a damp place. No. 64. Seville Orange Jumbles. TA K E some Seville oranges, and out the rind off them as thin as possible, and the breadth of a silver three pence, and as round as you can; put them on a -sieve into your tove; let them .and four or five hours; put some syrup over the fire, and let it boil a quarter of an hour; put your jumbles in the syrup, and give them three or four boils; drain your syrup from them, put them on a sieve in a hot stove, let them be there two or three days, till they are quite dry, then put them in your box and keep them dry. No. 65. No. 65. Burnt Almonds, Red. TA K frome of the finest Jordan al- monds you can get, sift all the dust from them, have some syrup boiling in a pan, and let it boil till it comes almost to ca- rimel, put half a cup full of cochinealt in; put the almonds in as fait as your can, and stir them till they are cold;' then put them in your sieve and break' them, that are fluck together, from eacih other; then have another pan of syrup' boiling, the fame as before, and When" they are cold, pick them frort each- other for they mufl always have the coats of sugar on them; fee that your cochineal is properly mixed, to make. them of a fine colour, as you must put more cochineal in the last coat than you did in the sirs. E z No. 66. No. 66. Burnt Almonds, JVhite. T A K E some of the finest Jordan al- monds you can get, and sift all the dust from them; then have some syrup boil- ing in a pan, and let it boil till it comes almost to carimel.; put your almonds in and. stir them till they are cold.; pick them in your sieve, break them that are ituck together from each other, and then have another pan of syrup boiling, the fame as before, and give them two coats of sugar; when done pick them from each other. No. 67. Piflachio Prawlongs, 'Ehite. T- A K E some pistachio kernels, and have a preserving pan on the fire with syrup, and boil it till it comes almost to .carimel; put in the nuts, flir them till they they are all covered with sugar, and give them two coats, the fame as burnt al- monds, white.- No. 68. Burnt Filberts, ihite. TA K E rome barcelona nuts and crack them; put the kernels in a copper pan, or Iheet, and put them in the oven to roast; then have a pan with syrup boiling and let it boil till it comes al- most to carimel; put your filberts in, fir them till they are all covered with sugar, and give them two coats as the burnt almonds, white.. No. 69. Merings in the Form of Eggs. TA K E a half pint bafon full of fy. rup, put it in a frmall flew pan, and boil it to what they call blow; then take the E 3 whites rhites .of three eggs, put them in ano- ther copper pan, and whisk them very strong; when your sugar is boiled, rub it against the fides of the flew pan with a table spoon; when you fee the fu- gar change, and all white, quickly mix the whites of eggs with it, for if you are not quick your sugar will turn all to powder; when you have mixed it as light as possible, put in the rind of one lemon, but do not stir it but as little as possible; take a board about one foot wide, and eighteen inches long, and put one sheet of paper on it; with your table spoon drop your batter in the ihape of half an egg, sift a little powdered sugar over them before you put them in the oven: let your oven be of a moderate heat, watch them very close, let them rife, andjuf let the out- fide be a little hard but not brown, the inside muift be moist ; take them off \witlh -with a knife, and put about half a tea spoonful of rafberry or strawberry jam in the middle of them; then put two of them together and they will be in the ihape of an egg, but you nmuft handle them very gently.- No.. . Almond Paqfe. TA K E half a pound of sweet and one dozen of bitter almonds, and pound them so- very fine that you can hardly perceive the least piece of almond in it; use water to pound them with, but do- not make them too wet, for if you do, it will be a long time before you can get them dry again; only just to keep them from oiling, take a finall fauccpan and a wooden spoon and put the paste in the saucepan, and half a pound of powdered sugar with it,. mix it well together, be- fore you put it on a flow fire, keep rub- E 4 bing bing it about with your wooden spoon in the pan, and be careful it does not burn, which it will if your spoon does not touch the bottom of the pan; when you find the paste does not flick to the pan, and comes altogether, then it i6 done.- N. B. Put a little flour on your dresser, that it may not flick ; when cold do as you please with it. No. 71. Orgeat Paste. TA K E two pounds of sweet and one ounce of bitter almonds, pound them very fine with water; have two quarts of syrup boiling, and let it boil till it is come to blow; mix the almonds with it, and stir it over the fire till it becomes very stiff, stir it all the time with a fpad- die or else it will burn at bottom; when cold put it in your pots, and tie a blad- der over the paper. No. 7z. No. 72. Orgeat Syrup. TA K E eight ounces of sweet and one ounce of bitter almonds, pound them very fine, that you cannot feel one piece of almond in it; mix one wine quart of water with it very well; strain it through a fine cloth; put in one gill of orange flower water, have two quarts of boiling syrup, and let it boil till it is almost carimel; mix.what drains from the almonds with the syrup on the fire, and let it boil till it becomes a fine fy- rup; put it into your bottles whilffit is warm; the next day cork them, and put bladders over the corks. No. 73. Lemon Syrup. TA K E fix lemons and rasp them very fine into a bafon; fquceze the juice of of one dozen of lemons to the rind, and' mix it well together with a spoon; take one quart of fine syrup, put it in a sauce- pan and let it boil till it is almost cari- mel; while your syrup is boiling, drain your lemon juice and rind through a fine sieve; take care that you put the juice to the syrup before it is carimel, or you will have your syrup too high ;. then let it boil three or four minutes, and observe that it is a fine syrup; when done take it off; let it stand a little time, and put it in your bottles while warm; the next day cork them, and tie bladders over the corks. No. 74. Orange Syrup. TA K E eight china oranges, rasp them very fine into a bafon; squeeze one dozen of china oranges and two lemons to the rind: mix it all together with with a spoon in the bafon ; drain all the juice through a fine lawn sieve; take one quart of fine fyrup,.and boil it till it is almost carimel; put the juice to the syrup, but mind you make it a fine fy- rup; put it into your bottles, cork and bladder them the next day. No. 75. Seville Orange Syrup. TA K E one Seville orange, and rasp it very fine; squeeze eight Seville oranges -and one lemon with the rind; mix it all well with the spoon; take one quart of fine syrup, and boil it till it is almost carimel; itrain your juice through a fine sieve, and mix it well with your syrup, mind you make it a fine syrup; put it in your bottles while a little warm; cork and bladder them the next day. No. 76. No. 76. Pine Apple Syrup. DRAIN the syrup from your pine apple chips, when you are going to dry them. that are preserved, as you will fee in your receipt of pine apple chips; boil the syrup three or four times, and put it into your bottles while warm; cork and bladder them the next day. No. 77. Capillaire Syrup. T A K E two quarts of fine syrup,. and boil it to blow; boil twice or thrice two gills and a half of orange flower water, skimming it all the time; put it in your bottles, and cork it up the next day; put pieces of bladder over the corks, but mind that it is a fine syrup, before you take it off. No. 78. 'No. 78. Currant Jelly, Red and White. P~U T your currants into a preserving pan, math them and put them over the ,fire; when they are all broke and jult upon the boil, take your fpaddle and put them on a hair sieve; let all the juice drain through a flannel bag till it is quite fine, if it is not fine enough the first and second time, put it through again; take as much sugar as you have got jelly, and let it boil almost to cari- mel then put your jelly in, and let it boil ten minutes, Ikim it all the time; then take it off, mind it is a fine jelly, and put it in your glasses. No. 79. RaJberry Jelly, for Ices. Pu T your rafberries in the preserving pan; wash them well with your fpad- dle, die, put them over the fire, stirring them .all. the time they are on; when they are ready to boil take them off, and pass theni through a hair sieve into a pan, letting .no feeds go through; put your jelly into another pan, set it on the fire, and let it boil twenty minutes before you put the sugar in, firing it all the time, or else it will burn at bottom; put fourteen ounces of sugar to every pound of jelly, let it boil twenty minutes, stiring it all the time, when cold put it in a brown pan and pots; sift a little powdered. sugar over it; let it stand one day and then cover it up: this jelly is good to make ice cream with. 'No. 80. Apple Jelly, to put over your Fruit, or what you like. TA K E one dozen and a half of ruf- fetings, pare and cut them in pieces into into a preserving pan, and take the cores; from them-; cover them with water, and' let them boil quite to a marmalade; put them in a hair fieve,.let them drain; have as much syrup inanother pan, as there comes jelly through the sieve, and. .let the syrup boil till it almost comes to carimel, put the jelly to the syrup, and let it boil ten minutes.; then put.it over your fruits, let it be hot No. 8i. Hart/horn Jely,. B OIL half a pound of hartrforn ihav- ings in a gallon of water, till one third .of the water is boiled away, then firain it off and let it stand till it is cold, melt it again, put in a little bit of orange and lemon peel just to colour it;, kim it well, and add half a pint of rhenish or white mountain wine, the juice of one' lemon and a half, with half a pound of fine fine sugar; talte it, and if it is not sweet enough to your palate, add more; take the whites of fix eggs, whisk them well and put them in; fiir these together, let it boil a little, take it off, and add as much-more lemon juice as will iharpen it to your mind; pour this into your jelly bag, firit putting in the whites of eggs, and. it will run the clearer, if it does not come clear the first time, pour ·it into the bag again, and it will come clearer into your glasses; let your bag hang near a fire to keep the jelly warm, till it! is all run off.; you may know when the liquor will jelly, if when it is on the fire, you take out.. a little in a spoon and let it cool. No. 8z. Calves Foot yelly. BOIL two calves feet in a gallon of water, till it comes to two quarts, strain it it off, and let it fland till cold, skimming off all the fat clean; take the jelly up alearfromthe sediment; put the jelly into a saucepan with a pint of mountain wine, half a pound of powdered sugar, and the juice of four large lemons; whilk fix or eight whites of eggs; put then in a saucepan, and flir them well with the jelly till it boils; let it boil a few minutes; pour it into a large flan- nel bag, and it will run through pretty quick, pour it again till it runs clear; get a large china bowl ready with two lemon peels rasped as thin as poffiblc; let the jelly run into that bowl, and the peels give it both a fine amber colour, and also a fine flavour; lanlly put it into your glasses. F No. 3. No. 83. Black' Currant Jelly. PUT your black currants into a pre- serving pan over the fire; mafli them with your fpaddle and just let them boil; take them off and drain them through a very fine ficve; boil them a quarter of an hour; to every pound of currant jelly put fourteen ounces of powdered sugar ; boil them ten mi- nutes; put it in your pots ; let it fland two days before you cover it up, and put brandy papers over the jelly be- fore you tie the papers over. No. 84. To make Blomonge. TA K E one pint of milk and half a handful of picked isinglass ; put the isinglass into the milk and boil it, till all the isinglass is melted; firain it through a ficvc ; a sieve; pound four ounces of sweet, and fix or seven bitter almonds very fine; put a little spice in your milk; wlhep you boil it, mix your almonds with the milk to make it palatable; pass it through a sieve again, put it in your moulds, and let it (land till it is cold. No. 8. Goofberry yelly. T A K E two quarts of green goofber- ries; and put to them two quarts of water; boil and lmalh them as they boil, until they are all to a mummy ; drain all the juice from them through a flannel bag; when it is all drained, take as much more syrup, as there is jelly from the goofberries ; boil the syrup to bloiv; put the goofberry jelly into it and boil it about a quarter of an hour, and mind you make it a fine jelly. I z No. S6. No. 86. Raf/erry Jam. PU T the rafberries into a large cop- per pan, stir them well at the bottom of the pan with a large fpaddle about three feet long; mash the ralbcrries as much as you can ; put them over the fire and keep flirring them all the time ; when you find they arc almost ready to boil, take them off; have a large hair sieve over another pan and pass the rafberrics through the sieve; the hair of the sieve must be large enough to let all the feeds of the rafberrics through; mind there is no pieces of rafberrics left; put them over the fire and flir them with your fpaddle; let the rafberries boil half an hour, stirring them well from the bot- tom as they boil, to prevent them from burning; put in fourteen ounces of powdered sugar to every pound of raf- berries ; berries; take them off the fire; mix, them well together and boil the sugar and rafberries together half an hour*; sift rome powdered sugar over the tops of the pans before they are covered. No. 87. Apricot anm. G E T the ripest apricots you can, cut them to pieces and take the stones from them; put them into a large copper prefcrvingpan, and mafhi them as much as you can; put them over the fire to warm, marhling them all the time; pars them through a cullender and keep forcing them with a fiall peffle; when they are all broke put them over the fire and just let them boil for ten minutes, ltirring them all the time; then put fifteen ounces of powdered sugar to every pound of apricots; let them boil together half an hour, flirring them all 1" 3 the the time with your fpaddle that it may not burn at bottom; when it is boil- ed enough put it into brown pans; when cold put some apple jelly over the top of them, and brandy papers over the jelly before you cover them, and let them itand two days before you put them by. No. 88. Slrawberry 'iam. PI C K the stalks from the strawberries, and put them into a large copper pre- serving pan; mash them with your fpaddle to break them as much as you can ; put them over the fire, make them quite hot almost to boil; pass them through a very fine cullender; boil the strawberries you have pact twenty mi- nutes, stirring them all the time with your fpadd'le ; weigh your firawberries; and allow fifteen ounccs of powdered fugt ar sugar to every pound of strawberries; put in the sugar and boil them together, tirring them from the bottom, (else they will burn) for half an hour over the fire; fill your pans and sift some powdered sugar on the tops of them before you put them by, and the next day put pa- pers over them;. No. 89. Barbenry y7an. PI C K your barberries from the fialks, and put them into an earthen pan, then into the oven to bake; when baked pass them through a sieve with a large wooden spoon, taking care there are not any skins of the barberries in it; weigh the barberries, and to every two pounds of barberries allow two pounds and a half of powdered sugar; mix the sugar and the barberries together, and put it in your pans, covering it up; fct F 4 it it il a dry place, but when you have filled your pans with it; sift a little powdered sugar over the tops of them. No. go. Peach 7am. G E T the ripest peaches, flone and bruise them ; put them into a prrcfrving pan and let them boil; maflh thlem very much, flirring them with your fpacddlc; when they are soft pass them through a large fievc; pound some bitter almonds with pow.vdcred sugar to keelp them from oiling; put half an ounce of them to a pound of jam ; put the jam and almonds over the fire and boil them a quarter of an hour; 3add ten ounces of powdered sugar to every pound of jan ; mlix the sugar and the jam together, boil it half an hour, flirring it all the time from the bottom, cllt it will burn; when it is boiled enough, put it into )'our pot or 1':"", pans, and when cold put some apple jelly over it, and brandy paper over that. No. g9. Black Plumb .Jam. G E T the ripest black muscle plumbs you can, cut them to pieces, flone them and put them into a large copper pan; bruile them as much as you can with your fpaddlc; warm them over the fire till they are soft; pass them through a cullender with a pestle and get as much through as you can ; boil it one hour, stirring it from the bottom all the time, or elle it will burn ; put fix ounces of powdered sugar to every pound of jam; take it ofF the fire and mix it well, put it over the fire ten minutes, then take it off and put it in brown pans sifting some powdered sugar over it. No. 92. No. 92. Rajferry Cakes. TA K E one pound of rafberry jam, orne pound of powdered sugar, and mix them well together with your spoon; have some small pieces of tin made in round rings about the size of half a crown piece, and about a quarter of an inch deep, and have a piece of wire fixed to the ring to lay hold by; then have a pewter Theet or plate, put your ring on it and fill it with your jam, stroke it over the top of it with your knife, have a pin and pull it along all the inside of the ring and lift the ring up and the cakes .will flick to the plate; put them into your stove, and let them be there until the next day; then take them off with your knife and turn them; put them on a sieve and let them be until the next day and when you find they are well dried, put them into your box. No. 93 No. 93. Seville Orang£ Pafle Cakes. C U T one dozen of Seville oranges into halves, and squeeze them into a brown pan; put the peels into a pan of water and let them boil until they are quite soft; take them out and scoop all the inside out of them; pound the peels in a mortar, then take one dozen and.a half of large apples, pare and cut them into pieces into a preserving pan ; add to them the juice of the oranges and water enough to cover the apples, and let them boil till they come to marmalade; pa'ss it through a sieve with a spoon, likewise pass the orange peels that are pounded through a sieve; mix the apples and oranges together; have as much syrup in another preserving pan as you have got jam; boil the sugar until it is nearly carimel; mix it with your jam, flirring themn well together; put it over the fire ten ten minutes flirring it all the time with your spoon ; put your heart tin moulds, or any ihape you like, and place them on your pewter sheets or plates; fill them with your paste, put them into a hot flove, and let them Rfand till you find the mould will come off easily, and without the jam's running; take them off and place them in a sieve and put them into your stove until they are quite dry, then let them lay in your flove one day. No. 94. Mllefruit Rock Candy. F I R S T get a tin box one foot long and a about eight or nine inches wide, and fix wires made to go into this tin ; the tin box muff be made rather fmallcr at bottom than at top, let there be a hole at the bottom about the size of a common quart bottle cork, and when you puc any thing in put a cork into this hole; put a layer of plaftc knots at bottom bottom and a layer of angelica knots; put a wire between every layer to keep them hollow, go on with layers of any thing you have got that is well dried and hard, have a pan of syrup and let it boil till it comes to blow, then pour it over them in the tin box and let it fland three hours in a very hot sto've; then pull out the cork at bottom and put the box on one fide for all the syrup to run out; let it stand half an hour in the f(ove, then take them out and you will find it will be candied all round them, then put them into your papered box. No. 95. Rock Sugar of all Colours. TA K E a pint of syrup, put it into a pan and boil it almoit to carimel; have a white of an egg in a little pot and mix a little powdered sugar with it, make it very very thick with a tea spoon; take your fyrupi off'the fire, put the egg and sugar into the boiling syrup; stir it round very much in the pan with a large spoon; _have a sieve papered, you must be very .quick about it or it will come over the pan; pour it into your sieve, when cold it will be hard like a rock and when you want to vary the colour mix what colour you fancy with your eggs, and sugar. No. 96. Barley Sugar. TA K E a small stewpan, put some syrup into it and boil it till it comes to .carinel; rub a little butter on a marble flone jufl to grease it that it may not flick; then take your saucepan by the handle and let the syrup run out of the spout along the flone in long flicks; twifl it (while it is hot) at each end and let it stand till cold. No. 97. `1 o. 97. Th/e way to make all, forIts.of Carraway Comfits. T A K E some fine carraway feeds, sift all the dust from them and have a large copper preser.ving pan about two feet wide and with two handles, and two pieces of iron made as a ring on each fide, then you must have a pulley fixt to the beam and a cord with a hook to each end so as to fix it at each fide of the pan to let the pan fling; then have some fine flarch as white as you can get and just soften it, boil tome syrup a quarter of an hour and mix it with the flarch; take some gum arabick, put it into some water, then put that into ano- ther pan and make it just warm ; have an iron pot with charcoal fire under the large pan, but not too hot, only just to keep the pan warm; have a large tub to put your pot of fire at bottom and your your large pan must be on the top; put the carraway feeds into your pan; add a large ladleful of gum arabick, rub therl with your hands until you find they are all dry ; then put the ladleful of starch and syrup and do the fame .over your pan of fire until you find they are all dry; put the gum only three or four times to them at firit, then the Itarch and sugar, but boil your f)rudp more as you find they come to coat with it and not so much starch; when you have dried them seven or eight times put them into your ficve; put them into the stove, do them the next day and so for fix or seven days successively. No. 98. Cardamom Comfits. G E T your cardamoms at the chy- mists and they will be in a shell; put them into your oven just to dry the fli ns, skins, and they will break; pick all the feeds from.them, put the feeds into your large comfit pan and have a fire under the fame as for others; mix your gum, ltarch, and syrup, and do them the fame about the pan with your hands. No. 99. Carimel Crocont. T A K E your copper crocont top and butter it all over, then have some fy- rup boiling in a ftew pan ; let it boil un- til it comes to carimel, take the pan off, dip a three pronged fork into the syrup or from the spout of the pan; and you will fee firings hang to the fork; move the fork to and fro over the crocont un- til you quite cover it thick, have your little difll of sweetmeats under, take this crocont off the mould and when cold put it over the sweetmeats and handle it very lightly, ' :G No. 1 oo. No. Ioo. Jfhip,for a Trfle. TA K E one pint of cream, put it in a freezing pot, put the pot into a little ice in an ice-pail, and whip your cream with a whisk; mix your wine and rind of an orange in another baron, and the juice of an orange and sugar according to your palate; put your cream in and mix it, then pour all the liquor into a dish that your trifle is to be in and put the froth of the cream over it, and put what your fancy likes to garnish it with; add different coloured sugar nonpareils and some small biscuits of different forts. No. iox. Everlasting Whfipfylabub to put into Glafes. TA K E five half pints of thick cream, half a pint of Rhenish wine, half a pint · pint of sack, and the juice of two large Seville oranges; rasp in the yellow rind of three lemons, and a pound of doubly refined sugar well pounded and sifted; mix altogether with a spoonful of orange *flower water, beat it well together with a whilk half an hour, then with a spoon fill your glasses. This will keep above a week, it is much the better for being made the day before it is used. No. Ioz. Floating Island; a pretty Di/ for the middle of a table, at a second course, or for a Supper. TA K E a foop diih according to the size and quantity you would wish to make, but a deep glass dish is the belt, put it on a china dish ; first take a quart of the thickest cream you can get, make it pretty sweet with fine powdered sugar; pour in a gill of fine mountain and rasp G z the the yellow rind of a lemon in; whilk your cream very frong as carefully as you can; pour the thin from the froth into a dish; take some Naples bis- cuits and cut them as thin as possible; lay a layer of them as light as possible on the cream, then a layer of currant jelly, again, a layer of Naples biscuits, over that put your cream that you saved; put as much as you can make the difih hold, without running over; garnish the outside with sweetmeats and what else you like. No. 103. Iceing for a Rich Cake. TA K E fix whites of eggs and whilk them very strong; then have a pint of syrup in a frnall Rtewpan, and let the fy. rup boil until it comes to blow through your flSimmer; work it about the pan with a spoon, when it is all white and is a great a great deal thicker, mix the whites of eggs together, make it very thick, put it over your cakes and put them into your stove; let them dry, then put another coat over them ; make it as smooth as pofible you can and let it dry in your flove. No. 104. T"o Clarify Sugar for Sweet- meats. 1 A K E a large deep copper pan and break two eggs into it, then whisk it as you pour the pan half full of clear water, so as to make it like soap suds; put two large loaves of sugar into it, and put it over the fire; take a large ikim- mer, stir till it is all melted, if you stir it longer your syrup will not be clear; be careful it does not boil over into the fire, for it is dangerous, as it may set the houfc on fire; when you find it begins G 3 to to boil and the scum rites, take it off thd fire, but do not stir it till it has flood half an hour; then you will find that all the scum will come to the top ; take a large slimmer and take it off clean put it on the fire, let it boil twenty mi- nutes, Skimming it all the time; strain it through a flannel bag very clean; put it into a pan or a large flone jar, and use it as you want it to your fruits. No. Io5. Cedraty Essence.. G E T the cedraties at the Italiarn warehouses, rasp the rind of them all round very fine; put it in a large mar- ble mortar, and allow for every quarter of a pound, two pounds of powdered sugar; mix it well with a large fpaddle till you find it is all of a colour alike, and that the rind is well mixed; put it into a flone jar and fquccze it down as hard hard as you can; put a bladder over the paper you cover it with, and tie it over quite tight; put it by, and in one month it will be fit to use. No. io6. Lemon Efenee. R A S P your lemons all round very thin, and allow for every quarter of a pound of rind one pound of sugar; mix it the very fame way you do the essence of cedraties, put it into a stone jar, and bladder it up the fame. No. 107. Orange Efence. A K E one dozen and a half of china oranges, rasp them all round and squeeze fix of them in with the rind; mix it well in a baron, let three pints of syrup boil about twenty minutes; mix the orange rind and juice and just give G 4 it it a boil or two and when cold put it in bottles and cork it up. No. IoS. Lemonade. A S P two lemons and squeeze fix, put to them three gills of syrup and the reft water; taste it, and if it is not to your palate, alter and mend it till it is right; then itrain it through a lawn sieve and put it in your glasses for use, No. I09. Orangeade. TA K E Eight china oranges and rasp four of them; squeeze the eight and three lemons to the rind; put about two gills of syrup to it and the reft water; taste ir, and if you find it not rich enough put tome syrup to it, and fquecze more oranges in according to your palate; and if not four enough fqll:ccze squeeze iin one more lemon; strain it through a lawn sieve and it is fit for use. No. i o. Currant WPater wade of Jelly. T A K E two large spoonfuls of cur- rant jelly, and mix it with a little warm water, then put one gill of syrup, squeeze two or three lemons in and let the reft be water; tafle and make it to your palate putting a little cochineal in to make it of a fine colour; strain it through a iieve and it is fit for use. No. i I I. FreJh Currant WVater. L A K E a quart of freih currants and squeeze them through a sieve with your hand; put two large wooden spoonfuls of powdered sugar and one lemon in, and the reft water; make it to your palate ; palate; strain it through a sieve, and it' is fit for. use. No. II2 Cedraty MIater. TAZ KE a large wooden fpoonfulof the efi'ence of cedraty, put it in a bafon, squeeze three lemons; add three gills of syrup and all the reft water; make it to your palate, mind that all the eflence is melted; and if it is not rich enough put more syrup in; pass it through your lawn sieve, and it is fit for use. No. I 13. Rafberry IJater, of Ra/berry Jam. T A K E two large spoonfuls of jam; put it into a bafon; squeeze fix lemons in and let the reft be water; put a little cochineal to colour it, put in a little fy- rup to make it palatable; pals it throughl your tour sieve, and be careful all the feeds are clean out, it is then fit forufe.- No. 'xIl. Fresh Rafberry P'ater. T A K E one pint of-freflh raflerries; and pass them through a sieve with a wooden spoon; put two large spoonfulS of powdered sugar in, squeeze one lemon in and let the reft be water; make it palatable and put a little cochineal in it to colour it; pass it through a sieve and it is fit for use. No. 15. Bergamot Water. SQU EEZE fix lemonsand to that add three gills of syrup, and let the reft be water; mind you make it rich before you put the essence in; when it is to your tartc, put a tea-spoonful of eflince of of bergamot in; pass it through a sieve and it is fit for use. No. i 6. Apricot Water. TA K E two large spoonfuls of apri- cot jam, and one gill -of syrup; squeeze four lkmons, put a handful of bitter al- monds pounded and a little powdered sugar in the jam, Co as to make it have the fame bitter taste as the kernels of the apricots; let the reft be water and make it palatable, pass it through a very fine lawn sieve, and it is fit for use. No. 1 I 7. Strawberry WYater, of Straz- berry Jam. TA K E two large spoonfuls of firaw- bcrry jam, squeeze three lemons, and add one gill of syrup and the rift water to to make it palatable; pass it through a lawn sieve and it is fit for use. No. 1 8. Fresh Strawberry Water. TA K E onepottle of frawberries and pick the stalks from them; pass them through a sieve with your wooden spoon; and put in two large spoonfuls of pow- dered sugar; squeeze one lemon, and let the reft be water; make it palatable, pass it through a sieve and it is fit for use. No. I 19. Barberry Water. TA K E two large spoonfuls of bar- berry jam and put them in a bafon; squeeze two lemons, put in one gill of syrup and the reft water; put a little cochineal in, and if you find it not rich enough put a little more syrup, make it it palatable, pass it through a-fieve, and it is fit for.ufe. -No. 20o. Peach Wafer. 'TA K E two large spoonfuls of peach jam in a bafon; put one handful of bit- ter almonds with a little powdered sugar; squeeze five lemons, put in two gills of -syrup, and let the reft be water; make it ,palatable, pass it through a sieve with a fjoon and it is. fit for use. .No. 121. Pear Water. GJ E T some large pears, rasp them into a bafon; if your pears are large four will be sufficient, if small, fix or ,eight; squeeze fix lemons, put in four gills of syrup and let the reft be water.; .make it rich and palatable, pass it through *through a lawn sieve and it is fit for use. .No. 2zz. Cherry Water. TA K E one pound of Kentish cher- ries, pound them in a mortar so as to break the kernels of them; take the cherries and kernels, put them into a baron and add four gills of fyrupp; squeeze four lemons in, and let the reft be water; make it palatable, pass it through a sieve and it is fit for use. No. I23. Orgeat. TA K E fix ounces of sweet and one dozen bitter almonds; pound them very fine so that you cannot feel one piece of almond; mix one quart of water with them, strain it through a lawn sieve and put one gill of orange flower water to it, and it is fit for use. ICE ICE CRE AMS 0 F ALL SORTS. ... - - rS-- --. --. No. I24. Barberry Ice Cream. . A K E a large wooden spoonful of barberry jam and put into a baron with one pint of cream; squeeze one lemon in, mix it well; add a little cochineal to colour it; put it into your freezing pot and cover it over; put the freezing pot into a pail and some ice all round the pot; throw a good deal of salt on the ice in the pail, turning the pot round for tcn minutes; then open your pot and and scrape it from the fides; cover it up again and keep turning it for fomc time, till your cream is like butter, and as thick; put it in your moulds, put them into a pail and cover it with ice and salt for three quarters of an hour, till you find the water is come to the top of the pail; do not be sparing of salt, for if you do not use enough it will not freeze; dip your mould into water, and turn it out on yourplate to fend to table. No. i25. Rafberry Ice Cream. T A K E alarge spoonful of raiberry jam; put it into a bafon and squeeze one lemon in; add a pint of cream and a little cochineal to colour it; pass it through a sieve into a bafon; put it into your freezing pot, and do as above direted in your barberry ice cream. HI No. 126. No. I26. Strawberry Ice Creami. T A K Ea large spoonful of strawberry jam; add a pint of cream and a little cochineal; put it into your freezing pot, and follow the first dircaions of your rafberry cream. No. I27; Apricot Ice Cream. TA K E one spoonful of apricot jam; put it into a bafon and squeeze one lemon in; take a handful of bitter almonds pounded with a little powdered sugar, put them all to a pint of cream and put it into your freezing pot. No. 128. No. 128. Pine Apple Ice Cream. T A K E one gill and a half of pine apple syrup, put it into a bafon and squeeze in one lemon and a half; add one pint of cream, make it palatable, then put it in your freezing pot and' freeze it till it is as thick as butter; if you would have it in the shape of a pine, take the lihape and fill it; then lap half a sheet of brown paper over the mould before you put it into the ice; and let it remain some time, and be careful no water gets into the shape. No. 129. Currant Ice Cream. TA K E one large spoonful and a half of currant jelly, put it into a bafon with half a gill of syrup; squeeze in one lc- mon and a half; add a pint of cream Hz and and a little cochineal, then pass it through a sieve and .freeze it as the others. No. I30. PiJfachio Ice Cream. BR E A K fix eggs into a pan and beat them well with a wooden spoon..; put in a pint.of cream, beat that well with the eggs .and put in the rind of a lemon, one gill and a half of syrup, and a little.cinnamon and.mace, boil it and stir it all the time, else it will burn, let it boil till you find it grows thick and .comes to a curd; then take it off; mix four ounces of pistachio nuts blanched and pounded very fine in a mortar with the custard ; pass it through a sieve and put it into your freezing pot. `'o. 131- No. 3:1. Bifiuit Ice Cream. 13 REAK fix eggs into a ftewpat and beat them-well with a wooden spoon ; add one pint of cream, the rind of one lemon, two gills of syrup and a little spice;. boil it till you find it just thick- ens, stirring it all the time; crumble some Naples biscuit and ratifia bifeuits.; pass them through a sieve with the other ingredient and put it in your freezing, pot. No. 13z. Plain Ice Cream.- Pu T one pint of cream into a freez- ing pot in a little ice, whisk it about till it hangs about the whisk; then take the whilk out and put as much pow- dered sugar as will lay on half a crown; stir it and scrape it about with your ice fcrapcr till you find it all fro- H 3 zen;. zen; put it into your moulds and put them into your ice to take the ihape. No. 133. Brown Bread Ice Cream. D 0 the fame with a pint of cream as in the plain ice cream, only when you have frozen it, rasp two handfuls of brown bread and put it in before you put it into your moulds. No. 134. Royal Ice Cream. TA K E the yolks of ten eggs and two whole eggs ; beat them up Iwell with your spoon; then take the rind of one lemon, two gills of syrup, one pint of cream, a little fpicc, and a little orange flower water; mix them all well and put them over the fire, stirring them all the time with your spoon; whien you find it grows thick take it off, and paTs it th rough through a sieve; put it into a freezing pot, freeze it, and take a little citron, and lemon and orange peel with a few pistachio nuts blanched; cut them all and mix them with your ice before you put them in your moulds. No. 135. Ginger Ice Cream. TA K E four ounces of ginger pre- served, pound it and put it into a ba- son, with two gills of syrup, a lemon squeezed, and one pint of cream; then freeze it. No. 136. FreJh Strawberry Ice Cream. TA K E one pint of fresh ftrawber- rics, pick the stalks from them and pass them through a sieve with your wooden spoon; add four ounces of powdered 1II 4 sugar sugar to them,and one pint of crear,. freeze it, &c. No. 137. FreSh Rafberry Ice Cream. T A K E one pint of rafberries paTs them through a sieve; put five ounces. of powdered sugar and a pint of cream, then freeze it. No. . 3 Frej Apricot Ice Cream. TA K E four ounces of the ripest apri- cots you can get, pass them through a sieve with your wooden spoon with four ounces of powdered sugar and one pint of cream, and freeze it. No. 139. Cffee Ice Cream. TA K E one ounce of coffee whole, and put it in a flew pan with one pint of of cream; put it over the fire and let it simmer and boil ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; drain all the coffee from .it,. break four eggs into a pan and add one gill and a half of syrup; beat them well up together, put the cream that comes from the coffee into it; give it a boil,. stirring it all the time, -pass it through a, sieve and freeze it. No. 40o. Chocolate Ice Cream.' TA K E one ounce and a half of cho- colate and warm it over the fire; take fix eggs, one gill of syrup, and one pint of cream; put it over the fire till it be- gins to thicken; mix the chocolate in,. pass it through a sieve and freeze it- No. 14x. No. 141. Seville Orange Ice Cream. R A S P the rind of one Seville orange into a bafon, and squeeze three, and two lemons; add two gills of syrup and one pint of cream ; mix it well, pass it through a sieve, and freeze it. No. I42. Lemon Ice Cream. R A S P one lemon, and squeeze three or four; add two gills of syrup and one pint of cream; mix it all to- gether pass it through a sieve, and freeze it. No. I43. China Orange Ice Cream. R- A S P one china orange ; fquceze four, and one lcmon and a half, put in two gills of syrup and one pint of cream ; cream pass it through a sieve and- freeze it. No. I44. Burnt Filbert Ice Cream. Ro A S T some Barcelona nuts well in the oven, and pound them a' little with some cream; put four eggs into a stewpan, with one pint of cream and two gills of syrup; boil it till it grows thick, pass it through a sieve and freeze it; then mix your filberts with it before you put it in your moulds. No. 145. Burnt Ice Cream. TA K E fix eggs, one gill of syrup and one pint of cream ; boil it over the fire until it becomes thick; then have two ounces of podclered sugar if another levwpan, and put it over the fire; let it burn till all melts, stirring it all the time n:dl and when you fee it is all burnt of a: fiaer brown, pour the other in,-mix it quick- ly, pass it through a sieve, and freeze it,. No. 146. Mllefruit Ice Cream. TA K E two gills of' syrup; squeeze three lemons, put in a pint of cream, and' freeze it; cut some lemon peel, a; little orange peel, and a little angelica into ftnall pieces; when it is frozen ready to- put into the moulds, put in your sweetmeats with a little cochineal; mix your ingredients well but not the cochi- neal as it must appear only here and there a little red, then put it into the mould.. No. 147. Fre/JI Currant Ice Cream.. TA K E one pint of currants, pass them through a sieve with five ounces of ,of powdered sugar and a.pint of cream, then' freeze it. No. 148. Cedraly Ice Cream. A K E two large fpoonfulls of essence of cedraty, put it -into a bafon, squeeze in three lemons and add one pint of cream; observe that all the essence is melted, then pass it through a sieve and freeze it. No. 149. Burnt Almonds Ice Cream. T H I S ice is done in the fame man. ner as the burnt -filbert ice cream. No. I50. Parmafan Cheese 'Ice Cream. TA K E fix eggs, half a pint of fymp and a pint of cream.; put them into a flewpan and boil them until it begins to thicken ; thicken ; then rasp three ounces of par- masan cheese, mix and pass them through a sieve, and freeze it. No. xir. Darfon Ice Cream. 'TA K E three ounces of preserved danfons, pound them and break the stones of them, put them into a bafon, squeeze in .two lemons, and a pint of cream ; p.ress them through a sieve and freeze it. No. I52. Prunello Ice Cream. Pu T five eggs into a pan with two gills of syrup and one pint of cream; boil it over the fire till it comes thick, then put as much prunello spice as will make it palatable; then pals it through a sieve, and freeze it. No. 153. No. 153. Peach Ice Cream. TA K E one large spoonful of peach jam, add one handful of bitter almonds pounded with sugar, squeeze one or two lemons, and put in a pint of cream; then pass it through a sieve, and fieeze it. No. 154. Black Currant Ice Cream. TA K E one large spoonful of black currant jelly, squeeze one lemon in and add a pint of cream; pass it and freeze it. No. 155. Cherry Ice Creat. TA K E half a pound of preserved cherries, pound them flones and all; put them into a bafon with one gill of syrup, squeeze in one lemon and add a pint of cream, pals it through a sieve, and freeze it. WA T ER WV A TE R I C E S OF -AL:L SORT S. No. I56. Barberry Water Ice. 'TA K E a large spoonful of barberry jam, put it into a bafon, squeeze in one lemon, add a.pint.of water and a little cochineal to colour it; pass it through a sieve and freeze it; be very mindful that it freezes thick and smooth like but- ter before you putit in your moulds. No. 157. No. 157. Ra/berry Water Ice. TA K E a large spoonful of rafberry jelly or jam; put it into a bafon, squeeze in one lemon, add a pint of water and a little cochineal, and pass it through afieve; if you make it roith jam be careful not to let any of the feeds get into your ice, let it freeze rich like but- ter, which if it does not, you must add a little more syrup, and then freeze it. No. I58. Strawberry kiater Ice. TA K E a large spoonful of straw. berry jam, put it into your bafon; squeeze in one lemon, add a pint of water and a little cochineal, and if it do not freeze rich enough, add a little more syrup and freeze it. I No. 59. No. i59. Apricot Jyater Ice. T A K Ealargefpoonfulof apricot jam, put it into a bafon, squeeze one lemon in, add a pint of water, and put to them. one handful of bitter almonds pounded fine, with a little sugar; pass them through a sieve, and freeze it rich and thick. No. I60. Pine Apple J$ater Ice. TA K E two gills of pine apple syrup, squeeze two lemons in, and add a pint of water; it must be rich and freeze thick; if you want to have it to the ihape of a pine, close it well and cover your shape with a sheet of paper before you put it in the ice; let it lie for one hour co- vered with the ice and salt before you turn it out. No. 16I. No. i6r. Chocolate P;aler Ice. A K E three ounces of chocolate, warm it and mix half a gill of syrup with- a pint of water; mriix it well and freeze it thick. No. 162. Seville Orange Water Ice. T A K E the rind of two Seville oranges off very fine and thin; squeeze them into a baron with one lemon; add two gills of syrup and half a pint of water; pass them through a sieve and freeze them rich. No. I63. China Orange FYater Ice. RA S P one china orange, squeeze in three and one lemon, put in two gills of syrup and half a pintof water; pass it and freeze it rich and thick. I z No. 164. No. 164. Lemon Water Ice. RA S P one lemon, squeeze three, and put in two gills of syrup and half a pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich, No. I65. Punch Water Ice. PA R E the rind very thin off one Se- ville orange, you are not to rasp it; put your parings into a bafon, squeeze in two oranges and one lemon, put in two gills of syrup and half a pint of water, mix it and pals it; freeze it rich, when frozen and mixed well with your spoon, put as much rum in as you think will make it agreeable to the palate, but when you put the rum in, take the freez- ing pot out of the ice while you mix it, which must be well done before you put it into the moulds. No. 166. No. 166. Peach [Water Ice. TA K E a large spoonful of peach jam, put it into a bafon with a large handful of bitter almonds pounded fine, one gill of syrup, and one pint of wa- ter; pass it and freeze it rich. No. I67. Currant' Water Ice. TA K E a large spoonful and a half of currant jelly, put it into a baron, squeeze in two lemons and half a gill of syrup and a pint of water ; then freeze it rich. No. i68. Prefh Currant Water Ice. TA K E a pint of currants, pass them through a sieve, put in four ounces of powdered sugar and one pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich. I 3 No. 169. No. i69. Fr ej RaJberry Water Ice. TA K E half a pottle of rafberries, pass them through a sieve, then put in five ounces of powdered sugar and a pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich. No. 1.70. Damson kWater Ice. TA K E a quarter of a pound of pre- served damsons and break the ltones, put them into a bason, squeeze in one lemon, add alooft a pint of water and half a gilll of syrup ; pass it through a sieve and freeze it rich. No. x 7 . Prunello Water Ice. Pu T two gills of syrup into a bafon; fqucezc in three lemons, half a pint of vwater, water, and as much prunello spice as will make it palatable; press it and freeze it rich. No. 172. Black Currant Water Ice. A K E one large spoonful of black currantjelly, put it into a bafon ; squeeze in two lemons, and add a gill of syrup and half a pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich. No. 173. Grape bater Ice. TA K E two handfuls of elder flow- ers, put them into a pot, boil a pint of water and pour it over them, cover them close; then take two gills of syrup and the juice of three lemons; drain all the water from the flowers, add it to the reft, making it palatable, pass it and freeze it; when it is frozen, put it in I 4 the the shape of a bunch of grapes, close it well and cover the mould with half a Iheet of paper; then put it into the ice and salt for one hour before you turn it our. No. I74. Cherry Water Ice. T A K E a quarter of a pound of pre- fcrved cherries sweet; pound them in a mortar jufi to break the stones; then put them into your bafon, squeeze in two lemons, add one gill of syrup, a pint of water, and a little cochineal; mix them well together; pass them, and freeze it rich. No. 75. Pear iater Ice. SQUEEZE three lemons into a bafon, add two gills of syrup, and half a pint of water; rasp four large French pears pears into it; mix them well and make it palatable, pass it through a lawn sieve and freeze it rich; put it into the fhaipe of the pear, cover the moulds with paper before you put them in the ice. No. I76. Millefruit Water Ice. SQU E E Z E three lemons into a ba- son, add two gills of syrup, and half a pint of water; freeze it rich, then cut some preserved orange and lemon peel with a little angelica in small pieces; put them with the ice which must be like butter before they are put in; pass it through a sieve before you freeze it, or put your sweetmeats in, then put a little cochineal in, but you are not to mix that much, only to be a little red here and there, as if to run in veins in the ice, but observe you do this before you put it in the moulds. No. 177. No. 177. Bergamot Wbater Ice. S QU E E Z E three lemons into a bafon, add two gills of syrup, half a pint of water and half a tea spoonful of essence of bergamot, pass it and freeze it rich before you put it into your moulds. No. 178. Cedraty Water Ice. T A K E four ounces of essence of ccdraty, put it into a bafon, squeeze in three lemons, and add two gills of fy- rup, and half a pint of water; then pass it through a sieve, freeze it rich, and if you would have it in the lhape of the cedraty, after you have filled your mould, close it well and cover it with half a sheet of brown paper before you put it in the ice. No. 179. No. 179. Frejk Strawberry Water Ice. TA K E half a pottle of strawberries, pick the stalks from them, pass them through a sieve, put in five ounces of powdered sugar and one pint of water; pass it and freeze it rich, if it do not freeze rich put some syrup in. FRUITS FRUITS PRESERVED I N BR A N DY. No. ISo. Apricots, in Brandy. G E T the best apricots you can of the palest colour and clear from spots, but not too ripe; put them in a pan of water, cover them over with paper and put them over a very flow fire; let them simmer till you find they grow soft; then take out those that grow soft; put them in a large tablecloth four or five double, and cover them up close; then have have some of the belt French brandy, it must not be coloured but clear like wa- ter, and put ten ounces of powdered fu- gar to every quart of brandy; let the sugar melt, then put your apricots into a glass jar, fill it up with your brandy and cover it up very close with leather and bladder, now and then keep filling up your jar with brandy, for the apricots fuck up a good deal, if you do not cover them close the apricots will lore their colour. No. I81. Peaches, in Brandy. GE T some of the finedl peaches, free from all spot colour, what is called the white heart peach; they come in the last in season; scald them in a stew-pan of water, take them out when soft and put them in a large tablecloth four or five double; put ten ounces of powdered sugar sugar to every quart of French brandy, white, let your sugar melt and stir it well; put your peaches into a glass jar, and pour your brandy over them; cover them very close with leather and blad- der, and observe to keep your jar filled with brandy. N. B. Mix your brandy and sugar before you scald your peaches. No. 182. Morella Cherries, in Brandy. GE T some of the finest morella cher- ries you can; cut the fialks and leaves from them about half an inch long and put them into your glass jar; put ten ounces of powdered sugar to every quart of brandy; when the sugar is diflolved pour it over your cherries, cover it close with the leather and bladder, and keep filling it up. No. IS3. No.. 83. Mogul Plumbs, in Brandy. TA K E some preserved, mogul plumbs and drain all the syrup from them, put them into your jar, put five ounces of sugar to every quart of brandy; when the sugar is melted pour it over your plumbs, and cover it close as be- fore directed. No. 184. Green Gages, in Brandy. A K E some preserved, green gages and use the fame method as your last receipt directs. No. I85. Green Orange Plumbs, itn Brandy. T A K E some peferved green orange plumbs and use the fame method as be- fore direced. No. i86. No. 186. Grapes, in ]lrandy. T A K E some preserved grapes and .use the fame method as before directed. PR E- PRESERVED S WE E T ME AT S, WE T. No. I87. Green Apricots, Wet. i A K E green apricots when they are the size of a small walnut, put them in a bag with a great deal of salt, and ihake them in it just for the salt to take off the silkiness of the ikin; then take them out, put them into a large pan with water, place them over a flow fire just to scald them, and when you find they grow soft, then have a flat preserving K pan. pan with a very thin syrup boiling in it, .but before you put them in, drain the apricots well from the water through a sieve; when the syrup boils put them in, but do not put too many in the pan .at a time, only let the syrup cover the. apricots ; but observe you do not crowd them in the pan ; boil your syrup about a quarter of ah hour, then take them our, put them in a flat earthen pan and cover them with a Iheet of paper, that no dust can get in; the next day boil them half an hour, and if you find they look well, drain the syrup from them through a sieve; boil the syrup twenty minutes, then put the apricots in again and just give them two or three boils; then put them in the flat pan and cover them close with paper, minding to keep them covered with syrup as it boils; when your syrup is of a fine thickncfs and the apricots look well, put them into into your p6bs an'd when cdld put a little apple jelly over them to cover the tdop'st No. 188. Apricots ]Ripe, Wet. SI R S T take a large knife, split the the apricots in half and with a small knife peel them fine, have a pireferving .pan on the fire with water boiliig, ipu rome of the apricots in; when you find they grow soft have two barons of cold water on each hand' and put the f6ft'eft by themselves, as those that are broken will spoil the reft; have a preserving .pan on the fire with thin syrup boiling, drain all the. water from them, and put she hardest ones in and let them boil ten rninutes, then put them in a flat earthen pan, arid c6ver theri with paper; then hive another preserving pan on the fire with syrup boiling; put' the soft oies in aiid just give them a: bil'or' two, th'eri K z put put them in the fame pan as. the others and cover them the next day; boil the hard ones five minutes, and put them in the fame pan again, but drain the syrup from the soft ones; boil it and pour it on them when hot; do the fame four or five days suc.cessi.vely, and keep them co- vered with. the syrup, then. put them in pots, and pour a little apple.jelly over the top, and be careful the pots are not in the least damp, for that will make them work andgrow four. No. i89. Preserved Pine Apple Chips, M/et. T A K E the top and flalk of the pine apple, chip off the ends of the out- fides and the bottoms of thenl; cut the pine apples in slices about the thickness of the fifth part of an inch; take an earthen deep pan, and one pound of fu- gar gar ; lay rome sugar at the bottom of the pan, then a layer of the pieces of pine, but not one over the other; then put another layer of sugar pretty deep, then another of pine, then another of sugar pretty deep, and so on till your pan is almost full; at the top put a good deal of- sugar pretty deep; cover them up with paper and let them stand till you fee the sugar is almost melted; let them and the syrup boil half an hour, then put them in the fame pan again, the next day give them another boil, and so continue eight days, then drain all the syrup from them entirely; if the syrup is too clodden, just dip the chips in a little water; then wipe them and lay them on your sieve to dry; mind the sieve is quite dry; as you put them into the flove, dust a little very fine powdered sugar through a cloth bag over them, put them in the Rove and let them remain K 3 there there till you-,think they wi.ll not give nor be flickey; then put them in y.our drawers or box with clean white paper about them. No. 90o. Angelica, 1Yet. C U T the stalks of the angelica about a foot long, put them in a pan of water and boil them till they are quite soft ; then firing the outsides of them, and put them into a tub of cold water, till they are all done; drain all the water off, lay them in a long earthen pan till it is three parts full, pour some boiling syrup over them and fill the pan with it, always keeping the angelica covered with fy- rup, and let it fland till next day ; there mufi be a hole in the fide of the pan towards the bottom that you may always drain the syrup from the angelica with- out (lilturbing it; boil the s)yrup, put it to the angelica for eight or nine days fu c- successively, and let it remain in ithe fame pan for use. No. 191. Barberries in Sprigs, Wtet' C U T the fides of the barberries- open, take the flones out of them, tie fix bunches to a piece of wood about an inch long and about the sixth part of an inch wide,-wind them on with red thread; put your barberries in bunches on a sieve, and have a preserving pan with sugar, and boil the syrup half an hour; put the barberries in the syrup, boil them and ikim them with paper, give fix or seven boils, always get the scum clean off; put them in a flat earthen pan and cover them with paper; those tied on a flick are called bunches, but what you would wiflh in sprigs must not be tied to a flick, you may put them in pots as other fwcetmeats. K 4 No. I92. No. 192. RaJberriits PVYIolie, lte/. T A K E some of the finest rafberries you can get, then with a large pin pick .the largest and dryeft; just cover the bottom of a sieve with them; put a pre- serving pan on the fire with syrup in it, boil the syrup ten minutes, then put the raiberries in, let them boil, and Ikitn them as they boil with whitish brown paper; ten or twelve boils are fufficienr, and of all things observe that the pots are quite dry before you put your rafber- ries in, for if they are the least damp it will spoil your fruit; the next day cover them with apple jelly and let them stand in the pots two days before you tie them up. No. 193. No. 193' Currants in Bitckh'es' Whole, tlWet. . T A K E some of the befl'curtinatsyoU can get; (lone them with a pin'and cuit them as little as you possibly can ; 'a'ke a fmatl piece of flick, tie about- fix bunches to this stick with thread, anr -lay them on a sieve; have your pieser- ving pan on the fire with your syrup in it, boil the syrup about twenty mi- nutes on a brilk fire; put your cur- rants in bunches into the syrup; only 'cover the bottom of the pan with them, nor put too many in; let them have five or fix boils, and take the scum off, with paper; put them in your pots; when cold put some apple jelly over the top of them and mind your pots are very dry as before dire&ed. No. I94. No. I94. Cedraties Wshole, kket. G E T the cedraties at the Italian warehouse ; make a hole through the middle of them at the thick end; put them in a large preserving pan with water and boil them one hour and a half, then drain all the water from them, set them up end ways to drain the water out of the ends; boil some syrup in a large preserving pan twenty minutes, then put the cedraties into a large earth- en deep pan, pour the syrup over them and let them stand two days before you meddle with them, then boil them with syrup half an hour; (do not let them be too soft) put them into the pan and cover them with paper; the next day drain the syrup front them, boil and pour it on them again and repeat it so for ten days, always keeping them covered with f3rup; those done in quarters are done the .the fame way only cut long ways before you first boil them; when done put them into your pots, and when ,cold cover them with apple jelly; take care your pots are dry, No. i95. Cherries Sweet, in Syrup.' L E T your cherries be the best Ken- tifh you can get, stone them, put them into a tub with boiling hot syrup over them, and cover them till the next day; then boil and put them in the tub again, the next day boil them foftly.twenty mi- nutes and put them into the tub again, continue this for eight days; then make a thick syrup for them, put them into it, then in an earthen pan or pot; put fonme apple jelly over the tops and brandy papers over them; if you want to dry sweet cherries, put them into yotr prcfcrving pan, warm them and drain themn them well from the syrup through a sieve; put them into the hot stove and shift the sieve every day till they are dry; then put them into your boxes. Whole cherries are ireferved the fanme way as those, only you leave the stones in and the stalks on them. No. 196. Cherries not Sweet, IWet, or Dry. L E T your cherries be the belt Ken- tifl you can get, and flone them in thi's manner; cut a quill as if you were go- ing to make a tooth pick, only make the end of it round, take hold of the cherry, thrust the quill down close to the top of the cherry, holding the italk at the fame time that you pull, then the Phone will come out without tearing the cherry to pieces, which otherwise it would do; when you have done so to all the the cherries, put them into a:tub,..and put a large quantity of powdered fugag over them, so as to put layer.s of;fiigara and layers of cherries till the tub.is fulli let them fland two or three days till yWq find all the sugar is melted, amongst the juice of the cherries; then let. th.em have one or two boils, pour them into the tub again, and let them fland till the ncxt day; repeat the fame four or five days successively; the last time pour vwhat you want to dry on a sieve, and when they are all well drained, have sieves enough to put them on, then pu.t them on the bottom of a sieve only jufl to cover the bottom; let your stove be very hot; put them in, changing them every day, and turn the cherries, they will dry the better, then paper your box, and put them in; those you would wish wet, put them in pots as befqre direced. No. 197. No. I97. Cucumbers ik Girkins, I'-et. LE T your cucumbers be clear, and *free from all spots, put them in salt and water, let them fland two or three days, then take them out and drain them well; put them in another pan of water, scald them, put them in a tub, and let them Iftand all night.; then drain the water --from them, put them into a pan of water, and to every two quarts of water put half a pint of syrup; put them in, .and let them.boil over a flow fire fivy minutes; put them in the tub again, and let them fiand till the next day.; then boil them again, drain that syrup from them, and have a clean pan with the syrup of a proper thickness; let it boil, put the cucumbers into it, and let them boil gently for a quarter of an hour; then put them into a flat brown pan, and cover them; let them fHand tWo .two days, then drain the syrup from them; boil the syrup one minute, and pour it over them; the next day boil them and the syrup together three ar four minutes and repeat the fame for five days; then put them in the pots or in a cream pan, and cover them up. N. B. Always observe -to let your preserved fruits fland two or thrce days before you put them up. No. I98. Comport Golden Pippins, WAet. LE T your golden pippins be the largest and soundest you can get; pare them very fine and clean, bore a hole through them large enough to put your little finger through; put some very fine syrup rathei thin in a preserving pan, peel tome lemons very fine, and put the peel in the syrup, which must be thinner than any thin syrup in' any for- Imer mer ingredients; put your apples in nd let them. fin mer over the fire very gently three quarters of an hour; then take them off and when cold. they are done, then put them in your cofitter for table. N. B. This.is a quick way when you want.a comport.in.a hurry. No. 199. Comnport Frengch rears, Ywhite, Yet.. L E T your pears be large and found,; cut them into quarters long ways; put them in a pan of water, and over the fire - which must be flow; let them simmer three quarters.of an hour very slowly.; then put some lemon peel in a pan of thin syrup; drain all the water from them; when your syrup boils, put them in and give them five or fix boils; then put them in an earthen flat pan, and the next day boil them again, till you think the the syrup is get wall into--hemp, then keep them in th brown pan for ,tfe.. No. zoo. Comport French' Pears;, Red, Wet. L E T your pears be large and found-; pare and cut them in quarters; prepare them as in the former receipt, only put some cochineal in to colour them, while they are simmering over the fire; put it in by degrees,.till you fee it becomes a fine red. No. 2zo. Damsons Whole, Yet. G E T some of the largefl and belt damsons, and prick them with a pin at each end, boiling some syrup on a briik fire, in your preserving pan for a quarter of an hour; then put your damsons in, and boil them twenty minutes; put L them :them in an earthen pan, cover them up with paper, and skim them as they boil quite clean; put them into your pan; the next day strain the fyrupfrom them, and let it have a good boil; then put the damsons into the pots, and when cold put some apple jelly over thenm. No. 202. Grapes in BunLces-, Iel. S T 0 N E your grapes with a large pin, have a large preserving pan with water in it, put half an ounce of fait in with the water when cold, and put a fhcet of paper over them in the water; let them simmer over a flow fire about half an hour; let them fland till cold, put them into a brown pan or a little tub with some water till the next day, then draw all the water from them; have Ibme thin ,yr.up boiling on the fire, put the grales into it, and when they are in, let let them boil five minutes; then take them off, put them into an earthen pans and cover them with paper; the next day drain the syrup from them, and boil the syrup a quarter of an hour; then put the grapes in five minutes; repeat the fame next day, till the syrup comes to a proper thickness, and the grapes look well, but be careful to have fyrui? enough to cover themn No. 203. Goofeberries in the Form- of Hops, AVet. GJE T the finest green goofeberries you can, cut them into quarters, and take the feeds out of them; take a needle and white thread, make a knot at the end, take hold of one of there goofeber- ries that you have cut, and push the nee- dle through the end of the goofcberry that is split, take another and do tlih L z fame, fame, and make it go part of it into the other gooseberry, and do so till you have got eight on; then you will find they will be in the form of a green hop; when you have finished your hop, fasten the ends of the thread; put them into a pan of water, scald them, and put them into a tub with their own liquor, that you have scalded them in; let them lie in the tub, three or four days, till they begin to grow four and ferment; then put them into some frefi water over the fire till they become hot, but not to boil, observe to put a little sugar into the water, and they will green; drain all that away from the hops and lay the hops regularly in an earthen pan; boil some thin syrup and put over them; give them a boil once a day, till you think they are done, and keep them in an earthen pan, till you want to dry them. No. 204. No. 104, Green Goofeberries, Wet. L E T your goofeberries be the largefl and finest you can get, put them over the fire to scald, but do not let them boil,'put them into a tub and let them sand three days; then drain all the li- quor from them, put them into another pan with water, and a little syrup with the water; let them be over the fire till they are warm, but not to boil only jult to come green; the next day Rfrain all the liquor from them, put the goofeber- Ties, into an earthen pan, and pour some thin syrup over them boiling hot; re- .peat it once a day for fix days; make the jyrup come thicker by dcgrees, and then ,put them into the pots. I, ^ No.,2 ?o^. *'No. 205. Lemons Wlhole, Wet. G E T some large clear lemons that have no spots, carve the outside of them with a knife as you like; scoop a hole at the stalk of them, that you may put your little finger in, that the syrup may penetrate the infidc ; have a large pre- serving pan with water, put the lemons into the water, cover them with paper, and let them boil gently, till you find them grow tender; thcn have tome thin syrup, boiling on the lire, drain all the water from the lcmons quite dry ; put the lemons into a finall tub, pour the syrup over them, and cover them with paper; let them fland till the next day, then drain the syrup from the lemons, and boil it a quarter of an hour; then put the lemons into the tub again, pour the syrup over them, and let thenm tand till the next clay; then boil the lemons and and syrup together for twenty minutes; put them into the tub again, keep the lemons covered with syrup, and if you find it shrink, put more syrup to it the next day; repeat the fame boiling, and when you find the syrup has penetrated the lemons, and they are clear, take a clean large preserving pan with more syrup, and boil it till it is pretty thick; drain the old syrup from the lemons, pu. them into the tub, pour the other syrup that is boiling over them, and let them Rand three or four days before you look at them, then if you find they have not fucked in the syrup enough, you may drain the syrup from them, and give them another boil for a quarter of an hour; pour it boiling over them, and always keep them in a flat eartlhen pan. L 4 No. 206. .'Jo. 2o6. Seville Oranges Whole, WYet. 'TA K E some of the largest Seville oranges you can get, and very clear firom all spots; carve the outsides of ithein in flowers or according to your 3own fancy; bore a hole at the flalk end of them, about the size of half your little finger; put them into cold water, for where you have carved them the find will turn black; let them be in cold water about four or five hours.; thcn put them on the fire in a large cop- per pan, and boil them slowly about four hours; then take them out of the water and turn them with the end that has the hole undermotf upon a sieve, that all the water may drain out of them; let some thin syrup boil a quarter of an hour in another pan, put the oranges in and boil them ten minutes; then put them in a fiall tub,pour the syrup over themll -them and.sover them with paper; the next day boil the oranges and syrup together a quarter of an hour on a brilk fire; put them into the tub again, and let them stand till next day; then drain the syrup from them and boil it twenty minutes, observing to keep them well covered in the syrup. continually boiling your syrup, and puting it over the oranges for fix or eight days till you find they are tender, and have taken the syrup; let them stand five or fix days in the syrup, give the syrup five or fix boils again, and pour it over the orahges into a large flat earthen pan, in which keep them for use. No. 207. Orange Peels, Wet. GE T some of the finest Seville,orange peels clean from spots; put them into a copper pan, if you have a great num- bcr ber to do, and boil them two hours; scrape the inside of them clean, that none of the pith remains; place the peels one in another round a finall tub, till the tub is almost full; pour a great deal of syrup over them till they are covered; let thenm sand two or three days before you touch them; make a hole at the bottom of the tub, drain the syrup from the peels, boil and pour it over them ; let them land for two days, then boil your syrup again, and let them fland for four or five days running; then drain all the syrup from them, and pour it when boiling on them again.; let them remain in the tub till you are going to candy them, then take them out, and wall them when you want them. , N. B. Observe to keep them well covered with the syrup. No. 20o. No. zoS. Orange Chips, Wet. 'TA K E some Seville orange peels, cut a bung or piece of cork round, so that it will go into the orange; with a sharp pen-knife pare them round, which we call turning, and cut your chips about the third part of an inch long; and partly the fanle thickness ; put them into a pan of water, and boil them gen- tly over the fire one hour and a half; have another pan with syrup boiling; drain all the water from the chips, put them into the syrup and boil them for a quarter of an hour; then put them into a large earthen pan, or a small tub, cover them, and let them stand till next day; then boil them again with the syrup a quarter of an hour; put them into the tub again, repeat this for four or five times; then put them into a .largc pan, not into pots, cover them well well with a syrup, and keep them for use. h No. zo9. Lemoi Chips, Wtet. T A K E tonme fine lemon peels, pare off all the rind with a knife, cut it all into pieces if you can about a quarter * of an inch wide ; put them into a cab- bage net, and into a preserving pan with water; boil them quite tender, then have another pan with syrup boiling, and when the chips are boiled enough in the water, take them out of the net and put them into the boiling syrup. N. B. Let them be well drained be- fore you put them into the syrup, and let them boil a quarter of an hour; then put them.into a large earthen pan and let them fland till next day; then drain the syrup from them and boil it ten minutes, and pour irtover them; cover theg~ them till the next day, then boil the chips and syrup together twenty minutes, . and put them into the tub again;.. keep them covered with the syrup, and when you think it is well soaked in thenr,, lboil them all together; put them into your tub, cover them well with fyrtli and keep them in the tub till you want to candy. No. z o. Lemon Peels, Wet. TA K E the largest and clearest lemon peels you can get; and throw into a large preserving pan with water; let them boil till you find them quite soft and tender, then take them one at a time out of the water, and with a table fpoodn take all the pith out of the inside clean from them; throw them into a tub of cold water, as you do them; let them fland in the water-four or five days. then then put your lemon peels.one withil the other, and place them round a large deep tub;,- have a' large preserving parl of-yrup boiling over the'fire, pour omer of the syrup over them, and cover the tub; let thenm sand two davs and bore a hole at the bottom of the tub to let the syrup out; boil the syrup three or four minutes, pour it over the peels again and keep them always well co- vered with syrup: repeat boiling the syrup in this manner for eight or ten days; then keep them in the syrup in the tub till you want to candy them. No. z2 . Pears, WIet. G E T some baking pears that are of a very hard nature, put the pears in a large preserving pan with water; let .them simmer over the fire till you find them rather soft; take them out of the boiling boiling water with a skimmer, and put' them into a baron with cold'water; pare them in this manner, first cut off ttie end of the pear, then hold the stalk e4l in your hand, and bring your knife down the ikin fraight, so as to make the skin come off in five pieces all round the pear; throw them into another ba- ton with cold water; have the preserving pan with the syrup in it, let the syrup boil ten minutes; then put the pears in; but first drain the water well from them, let them boil in the syrup again about ten minutes, skim it with paper, boil them in the fame manner fix days, draining the syrup off the paper every time till the syrup is of a fine thickness; let them remain in this syrup till you want to candy them. No. 212 No. 212. Green Orange Plumbs, Wet. L E T your plumbs be the soundest And best you can get, prick them with a fork and put them into cold water; have a very thin syrup, so thin as to be hardly sweet; scald them in it and let them have but one gentle boil ;- put them in an earthen pan, let them stand till the next day, then drain all the fy- rup from them, boil and pour it over them; repeat the fame eight or nine diays successively, then let them have a gentle boil and put them into your pots, observe that your pots are not the least damp; put some apple jelly over them when cold; let it be three days before you tie them up, and keep them and all other sweetmeats in a dry place. No. 213. No. 2 3. Mogul Plumbs Wet. T A K E the largest mogul plumbs you can get with clear skins, prick them with a fork about ten or a dozen times; mofily about the stalk; throw them into cold water, otherwise they will turn black where you have pricked them, put them over the fire just to scald them, have a pan half full of boiling syrup, drain all the plumbs from the water through a sieve and put them into the fy- rup, do not put too many in, only just to cover the bottom of the pan; boil the plumbs and the syrup ten minutes, then put therm into a flat earthen pan and cover 'them with paper; the next day drain the syrup from them through a sieve, let the syrup boil, put the plumbs in it and let them boil together; put them into the fame pan and repeat the fame five or fix days; it is best to M keep keep these plumbs in a flat earthen pan till you want to dry any of them. No. 2.4. Pine Apples, Whole, Wet. T A K E the pine apple, chip off all the small pieces of leaves from the bot- tom of every pine, take the top aiid italk, and have a preserving pan on the fire with water, and to every two quarts of water put half a pint of syrup to it, so as to make it very fine thin syrup, and only jufi sweet.; be sure that it boils before you put the pines in and let them simmer an hour over the fire; the next day let them boil gently another hour; take them off and cover them carefully, the next day let them boil gently about half an hour; put more syrup as thick as you use towother fruits, the next day .drain this syrup off and boil it, repeating the fame seven or eight days; then put them them into an i earthen pan, ,w4 v.oy them up vrery carefully fro. .amy dula and be ,very careful that your pans are very dry. No. 215. A Small rellow Phunb, A'ct, L- E T your plumbs be clear from spots, run a fork in once at eachoend and no -more, you must not have the plumbs too ripe, put them in.water as you prick them; boil a pan of syrup ten minutes; drain all the watr :from the :plumbs and put them in the fyrtp'; boil and 1kim them, repeat the fame four or five days; then put them carefully into pots, mind you do not break.theti .for they are very tender, and take care -your pots are very dry; let them fiand .two days before you put them by.; cut :mall pieces of writing paper, dip them in brandy and put it over your fruit in M z every every pot, this should be done to all fruits, it must be put close that no air can get in, then another paper over that; tie them up. No. 216.. Strawberries, fbhole, Ayet. OBSER VE to get the ftrawber- ries for this purpose in very fine dry weather, viz. that if it has not rained for three or four days, pick the largest and finest you can get; put some syrup into a preserving pan, boil it over a brilk fire for half an hour and put your straw- berries in while it boils, do not put many into the pan, only one strawberry deep; let them boil twenty minutes and take off all the scum with paper very careful- ly; if you find they are like to break take them off immediately and put them into your pots, when cold put apple jelly jelly over, and be very careful that your pots are not the least damp. No. 217. APpricot Chips, Wet. TA K E the chips that you cut off the apricots, and some powdered sugar; take a brown pan, lay a layer of chips and then a layer of sugar over them, and so on till your pan is full; let them itand till the sugar is all melted, boil them and put them into the pan again; boil them the next day, and so repeat the boiling them ten or eleven days fuc- ceffively; then have a proper syrup and put them in a brown pan till you want to dry them. No. 28S. Green Gages, /Wet. LE T your green gages be very found, prick them with a fork fix or C. ]." 3 IL.v. n ....,( seven times; or more about the ftaiks put them into celd water, or else they will turn black; scald them, and have another preserving pan with boiling fy- rup; drain the water from the gages and put them into a deep earthen pan-; yplace them reg-ulIarly and pour your boiling syrup over them; let them stand till hext day, then drain all th.e syrup frbm them ; boil it again, and put it. aver theti; repeat so for ieven or eight days, ·heln take another flat earthen pan, drain the, syrup from them, place your gages ir this pan; boil some frefi syrup for half an hour and pour it over them, co- veK themr up till you want them; you may put some into pots if you like. DRIED DRIED- FRUI T$. No. 2:I9. Damsons, Dried. L A K E damsons that you have pre- served, drain all the syrup from them, cover the bottoms- of the sieves and put them in your stoves which must be hot, change the sieves every day till they are dry, and as you change the sieves turn your damsons, and when they are not sticky nor likely to give, take them out and paper a box and put them in, and lay a paper between every layer of damsons. M 4 No. 220. No. 220. Mogul Plunmbs, Dried. TA K E mogul plumbs that you have preservcd, drain all the syrup from them, wash them in a bafon of water and lay them on a sieve; put them into 'the stove which must be pretty hot, turn them next day on another sieve, and let them stand in the itove two or three days; then put them in your box pa- pered, and lay a iheet of paper between every layer of plumbs. No. 2zI. Green Orange Plumbs, Dried. T A K E green orange plumbs that you have preserved, drain all the syrup from them, wafl them in a bafon of water, put them on ficves and into the ltove; change the sieves and turn them every clay on clean ficves; put them in vourt your box, and use the fame care and method as before directed. No. 222. Green Gages, Dried TA K E preserved green gages, put them over the fire to warm, drain all the syrup from them, put them on the sieves and. into the stove; change them every day and turn them, else they will flick; let them be in three days, and then put them in the boxes as before directed. No. 223. Pears Candied, or Dried. TA K E the pears out of the syrup, and put them on wires or a large fievc, drain all the syrup from them, wafli them in warm water to get the syrup off them, drain them quite dry; then have a pan of fyrul) on the fire a boiling, and let let it boil till it comes to blow, take the pan off the fire, and take a spoon and rub it on the fides of the pan till you fee it turn white;. then put your pears in and take them out, put them on a wire,- and let them stand till cold, then put them in your box. No. 2Z4. Cherries, Sweet, Dried. A K E your cherries and syrup, warm them over the fire, drain all the syrup from them, put them on the back of the sieves just to cover the bottoms; put them into the fRove the next day, change the sieve, put them in the stove again and let them stand three or four days in the stove; let them be well dried before you put them in your boxes, for if they are not they will grow four and be full of maggots; paper them as before directed. No. 225. No. 225. Cheries, not Sweat, Ptied. A K E the cherries that you prefer-- ved not sweet,. warm, them, put them. on your sieves and let all the juice run fromn them; then while hot put them on :th sieves, change them every day and let them be in the stove four or five days, afterwards move them about in the sieves till they are thoroughly dry, then paper your boxes as before direted. No. 226. Apricot Chips, Dried. TA K E your apricot chips, put them over the fire to be warm and drain all the syrup from them; then make the chips the size you please, put them on the sieve as you make them, dust some sugar over them through a bag, and put them in the stove; let them be there two days, changing the sieves once or they they will flick; when dry, paper and put them into your boxes. No. 227. Orange or Lemon Chips, Candied or Dried. TA K E your preserved orange or le- mon chips, wash them from the syrup with warm water, and the syrup you drain from them boil till it comes to blow; put the chips in and rub the sugar at the fides with the spoon all round till you fee the syrup all candy ; then take the chips out with two forks, and put them on a wire for the sugar to drain off; let them tfand till cold, and then put them in your boxes as before. No. 228. Angelica Knots, Dried. TA K E stalks of preserved angelicaG take them.out of your pan, wafli all the fy rup syrup from them with warm water, cut them in flips about a quarter of an inch long, and the length of the angelica when first preserved; double them into whatever form you like, and if you can, tie them up in the form of a true lover's knot; put them on sieves and into the stove, let them stand till they are quite dry and ready to be candied. No. 229. Barberries in Bunches, Dried. T A K E ome preserved barberry bunches, put them over the fire to warm, then on a sieve, let all the syrup drain well from them, then have your sieves ready and put them on; duff som'e powdered sugar over them through a bag; put them in the stove and let theril remain there till they are quite dry, changing your sieves and turning the bunches; they must fland in the flove four -four days.; paper your box and put them in as before direced. N. B. The above ,method, does for currants. 'No. z3o. Lemon Peels, Candied or Dried. 1 A K E some preserved lemon peels, -wash them in warm water and put them on a sieve to drain; boil some syrup on *the fire till it comes to blow, and put your peels in; as soon as they ,are covered with sugar take them out again, put them on wires for all the sugar ,to drop through:; then let them stand till cold and put them in your boxes. N. B. Do orange peel in the fame manner. No. 2AT. 'TA K E some preserved cucumbers, wash all the syrup from them, put them on your sieves to drain, then into your stove to dry, one-day is enough for them to dry.; afterwards put them in your boxes as before direced. No. 232. Green Apricots, Dried. TA K E some preserved green apri- cots, wash them in a little warm water, put them on your sieves into a hot fiove, changing your sieves every day ; let them remain two or three days in the :tove until they are well dried, then put them into your boxes papered, and cover :them as before direted. No. 233. No. 233. Apricots full Groown, Dried. A K E your apricots full grown that you have preserved whole, or those in halves; wash them in warm water, put them on sieves regularly, not to let them touch one another; put them into a hot flove for two or three days, chang- ing the sieves every day; when dry put them into your boxes. No. 234. Grapes in Bunches, Dried. T'A K E some preserved grapes, wash them with warm water, put them on your sieves, and into a hot stove, keep turning of them every day, changing your sieves; when well dried put them into your boxes. No. 235. No. 235. Pine Apple Chips, Dried. TA K E your slices of pine apples that you have in syrup, and wash them in warm water, then put them on your sieves in such a manner that they do not touch each other, then take some fine powdered sugar, put it into a fine linen bag and just ihake it over them; keep turning of them every day for three or four days in a hot stove; when dry put them into your papered box with writing paper between every layer. No. 236. Cedralies, Whole,: or in Suarters, Dried. T A K E your preserved cedraties ei- ther whole or in quarters, walh them in a little warm water; boil some syrup in another pan till it comes to a blow; take N a large a large spoon and rub it well to the fides of the pan till it comes white; dip your cedraties in, take them out and put them on your wires over another pan; let them drain well, then put them into a hot fove on the wires for one day, till the candy dries all round them; when well dried put them into your boxes as before direced. No. 237. PaJte Knots, Red or WFhite. PA R E some large apples, and cut them into a preserving pan, with just water enough to come up to the top of the apples ; let them boil till they come to marmalade, then pass it through a sieve into a flat brown pan; take some cochineal and mix it with the apples to make them a fine colour; have another prelerving pan with as much syrup in it as as you have got apples, and boil the syrup until it comes to blow; take the syrup off the fire and mix the apples with it in the pan ; have iheets or plates made of pewter, about a foot and a half long and about ten inches wide; 'with edges turned about the eighth: part of an inch to preventthe paste fromfalling or running off; cover your plates with your paste and put it into your stove, which must be hot; let them remain till next day, then take another pewter sheet and with a knife cut the paste round the edges, and across the plates scores about a quarter of an inch wide; then pull it off, and if it comes off easy it is dried enough; when you have got it off in long firings, try to make them into knots according to your fancy; put them on the other plate, then into the stove, and let them fland in the flove two days; N 2 then then take them out; when they are cold put them into papered boxes, and let them remain there until .you want to- candy them. INDEX. ( x~ ) INDEX. A A LMONDS, the way to blanch -. Page 32 - ---- burnt, red 67 .--------- burnt, white 68 Almond paste 71 .-- fagots 40 cake., a fmoall fine 45 B BISCUITS, fine Savoy I ----.----- fine fpunge 3 -------- orange heart 4 N 3 Bifclits, Biscuits;, Naples - Page 5 - yringe - - - 7 -robe de chambre - - 9 ----- common Savoy - '1 - fweatmeat - - 1 ---- monkey - - 12 -- spice - - 13 toad in a hole - 4 - : 'millefruit - - 15 ---- rmafapan - 16 -- jjudges - - - iS ---- Yarmouth - - 2 ---- king's - - 22 chocolate - - 2 -.-- - Italian water - - 23 ---- . letnon - - - ratafie - 35 orange - - 36 filbert - - - 37 ---- - piltachio nuts - 38 - orange flower - 39 - frefli apricot - 4. Biscuits, Biscuits, fresh barberry Page 43 __ - fresh damson, or refined cheese - - 44 Blomonge 8- C CAKES, Queen - 9 __-- Water, with carraway feeds - - - 25 fine Shrewsbury 30 -- fine ginger - 4 - rafberry 9 - Seville orange paste 91 ___ -- a finall fine almond 45 -_ . .. -a large rich two guinea 46 a small rich feed 47 _- a finall rich plumb 48 Comfits, carraway of all forts 95 - cardamom - 9' Crocont, carimel - 7 Drol.. D R 0 P S, bergamot Page 54 - black currant - 5 '------ chocolate - 6 damson 5- Seville orange - 58 - lemon 58 -- - orange - 59 peppermint - 60 violet . 6r - barley sugar - 6 DRIED FRUITS. RIED damsons - i Dried, mogul plumbs - green orange plumbs 184 green gages - . 8 -- - pears, or candied - 85 cherries, fwect - i86 Dried, Dried, cherries, not sweet Page 187 -_ apricot chips - 187 orange or lemon chips .188 --- angelica knots - 188 -_ barberries in bunches I89 .- - lemon peels, or candied 190 - cucumbers - 191 -- green apricots - 191 - apricots full grown 192 - grapes in bunches - 192 - - pine apple chips - 193 - - cedraties, whole, or in quar- ters - - - 193 paste knots, red or white 194 E " ESSENCE, cedraty - 102 ..---.. -- lemon - 103 . I .------ orange - 103 FAGOTS, F FA G 0 T S, fine almond Page 40 Floating island99 Filberts, burnt, white - 69 J JUMBLES, Seville orange 66 Jelly, currant, red and white 77 - raffierry, for ices 77 -- apple - - 78 -- hartfhorn - - - calves foot - - 8 --- black currant - - 8 -- goofberry - - 83 Jam, rafberry - - - 84 *apricot - 85 - firawberry - 86 - barberry - 87 Jclly, Jam, peach - - Page 88 --- black plumb . - 89 ,,[ J Ic E I N G, for a rich cake Ioo Ice cream, barberry - - II -rafberry - I13 - trawberry - 14 ----- - apricot - - 14 p- pine apple - 115 -currant - - i - piflachio -i6 --- -- biscuit - - 117 ----- plain - -I17 - brown bread - 118 --- - - royal -I8 - ginger - - 1 9 ,----_- - frefli frawberry 19 - fresh rafberry - I20 - fresh apricot i20 - - coffee - - 20 Ice Ice cream, chocolate Page i2i Seville orange - 122 lemon - - 22 *----- china orange - 12z - ------- burnt filbert - 123 ------ burnt - 2 L------ millefruit - 124 - fresh currant - I24 - - cedraty - - 125 burnt almonds - 125 ----- - · Parmafan cheese 125. -- - danfon - - 126 - - prunello - 26 -- - peach - 127 '----- blackcurrant 127 - cherry 127 L LEMONADE - 104 Orangeade - - 04 M A C M M A C C AROON S French Page 33- -- English 34- Merings, in the form of eggs 69- Millefruit, rock candy - 92-- N N U T S, fine fweatmeat ginger- : bread 27 0 ORGEAT, - - I syrup 73 - paste 7- PRAVW- PR A W L 0 N G S, lemon Page 6z orange 63 - --- - piftachio,red 64 -------------- pifiachio, white - - - 68 '------*---*----- burnt fil- bert, red - - 64 -orange flower - - - 6 Paste, almond - - - 7 -- - orgeat - - - 72 To PRESERVE FRUITS IN BRANDY. PRESERVED apricots in brandy - - I40 Preserved peaches ditto - 14 -morella cherries ditto 142 Preserved Preserved mogul plumbs in brandy Page 143 green gages ditto 43 -green orange plumbs do. 143 ____- grapes ditto - I44 To PRESERVE SWEET- MEATS, WET. 'T preserve green apricots, wet 145 To preserve apricots ripe, ditto 147 ---- - pine apple chips, ditto I48 angelica, ditto 150 ----- barberries in sprigs, do. 151 ------- rafberries whole, ditto 15i --- -- currants in bunches, whole, ditto - - 153 cedraties, whole, ditto i $4 - cherries, sweet, in syrup 15i -cherries, not sweet, wet or dry - - 56 To To preserve cucumbers and girkins, wet Page 158 ---- comport golden pip- pins, ditto - - 59 .----- comport French pears, white, ditto - - 163 ---- comport French pears, red, ditto - - 16 -- damsons whole, ditto x16 :.------ grapes in bunches, do. 162 *--.- . goofberries in the form of hops, ditto - I63 . - --_ green goofberries, do. 165 ----- lemons whole, wet 66 - Seville orange, ditto I68 _--- -orange peels, ditto I69 ------ orange chips, ditto 171 - lemon chips, ditto 172 «----- - lemon peels, ditto 1 73 ------ pears, ditto - 174 - . ·-- green orange plumbs, ditto - - - I76 To To preserve mogul plumbs,wet Page I 77 ---- -- pine apples whole, do. 178 - a fmallyellowplumb, do. 179 -- - - firawberries whole, do. 180 .---- apricot chips, ditto I8r - ----- green gages, ditto 181 R R U SK S, French 26 S SY R U P, orgeat - 73 --- 7lemon - - ---- orange - - 74 ---- Seville orange - 75 ------ pine apple - 76 - . .- capillaire - - 76 Sugar, rock, of all colours - 93 - barley - - - 94 ---- to clarify for sweetmeats o01 0 TUR- -T TURTULONGS, fine, for break- fat - - Page 29 Trifle, a whip for - 98 sr W A SERS, lemon so - barberry - 5 - orange 52 .- -- - bergamot 52 "----.--- violet -53 ~~ --- peppermint - 54 Water, currant, made of jelly I05 Water, frcfli currant - 05 - - cedraty - Io6 -- b- crarry, of jam - o6 - - frcflh rafberriy - 07 ---- - bergmot - 107 \Vatcr, Water, apricot - Page Io8 - frawberry, of jam Io8 - - fresh firawberry - io9 - - barberry - - 109 -- peach - - o pear - - 0 cherry - I Water ice, barberry - 28 rafberry - 29 frawberry - 29 apricot - - 30 -_- pine apple - 30 - -- chocolate - 13 - Seville orange - 31 -----_ china orange - 13 - -- lemon . - 13 punch 3- 2 - peach - 33 - curra3nt - fi-efh currant 33 frcfl rafberry - 34 --- - damson - - 13 Water WVater ice, prunello - Page I34 ----- black currant - 35 - grape - - 135 cherry - - I36 - -- pear - - 36 - millefruit - - 137 137 - bergamot - - I38 - cedraty - .- 8 - fresh strawberry 139 Whip syllabub, everlasting, to put in lasses - 98 THE END. hK!- TA\