Full Citation

  • Title The cook maid's assistant, or art of cookery, made plain and easy. Containing The greatest Variety of approved Receipts, in all the Branches of Cookery and Confectionary. Viz. Marketing, Roasting, Boiling, Frying, Broiling, Stewing, Hashing, Baking, Fricassees, Ragouts, Soups, Broths, Gravies, Sauces, Puddings, Pies, Tarts, Cakes, Syllabubs, Creams, Flummery, Jellies, Jams, Custards, Potting, Collaring, Drying, Candying, Pickling, and English Wines. With a Bill of Fare for each Month in the Year. The whole calculated to assist the prudent house-wife in furnishing the cheapest, and most elegant dishes, in the various departments of Cookery. By the late Mrs Eliza. Clifton, of Richmond in Surrey
  • Author Clifton, Elizabeth
  • Imprint London : printed for the proprietors, and sold by all booksellers in town and country, [1775?].
  • Collection Science, Technology, and Medicine I
  • Pages 227
  • Language English
  • Document Type Monograph
  • Microfilm Reel # 12529
  • ESTC Number T224642
  • Physical Description xii,216p. ; 12°
  • Source Library British Library
THE COOK MAID's ASSISTANT, O R Art of Cookery, MADE PLAIN AND EASY. C ON T A I N I N G 'The greatest Variety of approved Receipts, in all the Branches of COOKERY and CONFECTIONARY. VIZ. Marketing, Roating, Boiling, Frying, Broiling, Stewing, Haihing, Baking, Fricassees, Ragoutsi Soups, Broths, Gravies, Sauces, Puddings, Pies, Tarts, Cakes, Syllabubs, Creams, Flummery, Jellies, Jams, Custards, Potting, Collaring, Drying, Candying, Pickling, and English Wines. With a Bill of Farefor each Month in the rear. The whole calculated to aflift the prudent House. wife in furnishing the cheapelt,. and most elegant Dishes, in the various departments of Cookery. By the late Mrs ELIZA. CLIFTON, of RICHMOND in SURREY. L O N 1)O N: .PP.s1Tri for the Proprictors, and Sold by all Bookfcllcra in Town and Country. D E D I C A T I O Ne TH rE fupcrior abiiities of Mrs CiftIon, in her ex>tcifve line of enteel Ccokery, wvere itnrc. approved by every Lady, curious in the fq/;ionab.e CULI.NAL.y SCerNCE ; 'vho v7fted the polite re- fpeRable Families, nwherein lMrs Clfton ckhifly re- Jfded; and the partircuar attention J/he conftan!ly gave to n seasonable feleclioa of the following valu- able rece pts, vwhich were always eJfimated as her principal A/Jtflants in actual praeice, have induced hie surviving Friends thus to p.'eferve them, by a rvfpecfu! Dedication it tho fe prudent good Ladies, uwho wvij to support a decent frugality, throu'huit i.c various departnniwtt of 3able Entcrllai'zent. C ;v. 3 C NT E N T S. .Dipce3ior for the prvpeJ. Cchice of dejjren. .kiud of Pro vjionrJ. C c A P. 1 Of R 0 A S T I N G. Rules to be observed 7 Roast mutton - 7 ----- ---.to make it eat like venison 8 ---breaff of mutton with. forc'd meat 8 - beef 9 - veal 9 --amb I o -, pork Io - chine pork fluffedi x --_pg - II Dress pigs.petty toes 12 Roast calf's liver 12 --h---head - 3 tongue - 13 Dress pickled n-ats ton- gue - 13 Game and Poultry. Roast venison 14. ---hare --rabbits - 15 Roaflturkey,goofe,&c. 1g --- fowl or turkey with chefnuts 16 ---fowl the German way - x 7 green goose 17 - fowls or chickens 8 -woodcock or fnipeiS -- wild ducks, Vid- geons, or teal I 8 --- pigeons - 9 ---couple pheasants 19 - partridges 20 - larks - 20 - quails. - 29 -- ortolans - 21 Dress ruffs and reifs 2 RoaJfing Fyh. Roast cods head 2X - pike - 23 ---eels and lampreys 23 -- lobllers - 23 .; C H A P. II. Of BOILING. Observations - 24 Keep meat hot 26 Iooil a leg of veal 26 --. calf's head 27 ---leg lamb with the loin fried about it 27 Boil beef or mutton 27 ~- leg of mutton, vcnifon fafllion 28 ---bunch of venison 28 -:V. 3 BIoil pickled porl. 29 -- leg of pork luffed 29 - ham . - 29 --tongue - 30 rabbit with onions30 - rabbits with fau- fages - 31 Game and Poultry Boil pheasants - 31 -partridges 3 r --woodcock or snipe32 - turkey - 33 fowls or chickens 34. ---oose - 34. --(-cuck 34 - pigeons - 34 -----another way 35 F/1. Boil sturgeon. - 35 - turbot 36 -- fresh cod 36 - cod's head 3.7 Dress salt cod 37 Boil fiateorthorlnback 37 - flounders &c. 38 --salmon - 38 - mackerel. Boil haddocks --- cap or tench --pike, orjack -cels - cod founds ---herrings Dress turtle Greeins, &c. Boil garden fluff - alparagus --artickokes --broccoli - cauliflowers - green pcafe - Fiench beans --- Yindfor beans '-- fpinage ---cabbage ---frouts - turnips -carrots _ -parfinips -potatoes Scolloped potatoes Dress a fallad Undrcffed fallad 39 40 40 4° 4-t 4' 42Z 43 44 4+ 4+ 45 46 46 4.5 .46 47 47. 4S 4S I-, 4y 49 49 5s 39' C H A P. III. Of FRYING. Fry beef steaks 50 _----with oyffers. 5r - mutton steaks 5 r - mutton cutlets 52 --- al cutlets 52 --scotch collops 52 -- loin of lamb 53 a-otller way 53 --a;fiiges 54 - an-tnothler way 54. Fry tripe - 54 --calf'sliver& bacon 55 ---fweetbreals and kidneys - 55 --cold vcll - 55- -pancakes - 5 Make apple fritters 56 Fry carp - 5. ---tcnch ' . 57 .3 r v-. r .rry trout 57 -flounders 57 ----kate - S'8 - herring - 58 - small fifll 58 - eels 59 --oyflers - 6o -haddocks -. 60 Fry lampreys -. o Garden Stufl. Fry artichoke bottoms 6 r -cauliflowers - 6t -celery - - 62 -potatoes - 6z -onions - 62 -parsley - 62 C HIA P. IV. Of BROIL IN G. Broil beef, or mutton Broil salmon - 6S Rfeaks - 63 ---whiting or hadd. 66 - pork fleaks - 64 - mackerel -66 -- tongues of fieep -herrings 66 or ogs - 64 - cod's head - 66 Poultry. - cod founds - 67 Broil chickens - 64. -- eels 67 - pigeons - 65 -eggs - 67 CHAI A P. V. Of S TEWIN G. Stew a rump of beef 63 - beef - 69 --veal - 69 -- leg,orneckmutton70 --- ox palates - 70 -beef collops - 70 ---nmutton clops 71 - a ilcall of veal 71 - a pig - 72 Gtta,,l na;l Pua/try. Stew a hare 72 ---jog, ecd 1) n re ·--tilil. :icc 1 011 foills -chickeis - ----pigeiios 72 73 73 74 74 Stew ducks whole 75 -- wild fowl -7 - a goose - 75 --giblets 76 - wood cocks orpar- tridges ; 76 Stew a cod 77 - trout - 77 - eels - - 78 - flounders, plaice, and soles - 78 - carp or tencl 79 - oyflcrs, mui cles, & all kinds of flcll fifl 79 C vir. 1 CT{ A P. V1. Of HA S H E H-ash mutton - 80 Game ai ---beef - So Haflh venift --acalf'shcadwhite8t ---a cold Mince veal - 8 key Dress a lamb's head and --rabbit pluck - 81 --any f Hash mock turtle 83 C H A P. VII. S. nd Poultry. on - 83 fowl or tur- - - 83 :ts - 84 ,rt of meat 84 Of BAKING. Bake mutton ifeaks --a leg of beef --a calf's head - a bullock's heart ---a pig 84 85 85 86 86 Bake fish - 87 ---herrings or mack- erel - 87 C H A P. VIII. Of FR I C A S S E ES. Fricassee lamb 88 lamb-ftones and sweetbreads 88 --- -calf's head 89 - cold roait beef 89 .veal - 9° .-- rabbits, chick- ens, &c. white go ---pig - 9' - pigeons - 91 ~-- ox palates 92 - calves feet . 92 Fr:caffee tripe - 93 -- lare - 93 ----ducks - 94 -- neat's tongue 94 -- cod founds 94 ---- oles,plaice,&c.95 ---- artichoke bot- toms - 96 ---mushrooms 96 ---,eggs, with o- nions and mufl- rooms 96 C I A P. IX. Of RAGOUTS. R.agout a breafl ofvcal97 lamb ,-_fore cquartcr of - Ragout linib-ltones 97. 98 C ragout piece of beef called beef a-la- mode 98 Force sirloin of beef 99 Ragout a leg of mutton 99 -- calf ' head loo vl'i. J Ragout tonake it i ich ( z' - -formadedifhesi o1 ----of oysters l o ----of mufirooms Io ---of flurgeon o02 CHA A P. X. Of SO UPS, and Rules to be observed 103 Make white peasfoup 103 - gravy soup - 104 -- green peas soup without meat 104 --com mon peafc soup - r05 - 3 very good soup xc5 - verinacelli soup ic6 - onion soup - o6 -- barley soup . 107 --hare soup - 107 --a pocket or por- table soup - io8 1BROTHS, &c. Makeoyfter soup - 1ro --eel fonp - 109 --mutton broth x zo --beef broth i o --hlen or chickcn broth - o1 Boil a scrag of veal x r I Make jelly broth for confimptive per- sons iIr --scotch barley broth - I- --beef tea - 112 C H A P. XI. Of GRAVI'ES and SAUCES. Gravy for mofl. things-i 13 Make white gravy 113 i- firong gravy 114 Draw beef, mutton, or veal gravy 1 14 Make strong lifh grayyl 15 -faluce tor a green goose - - 115 ,-faiuce for roaflod venilio or hare 15 --rol I meat faucc 1 1I5 - a flanding sauce I 16 _--cnap(cr sauce 11 6 Melt butter x 16 Clarify butter - I 17 Make onion sauce 117 -egg faucc 1 17 --white sauce for fowlsorclickens I 1 ' --- apple sauce for a goose or pork 118 --lobster sauce - 18 --flnhimp sauce 11 9 -- celery sauce 11 9 - oyfler fauoe 119 - anchovy sauce 12o. -a very good sauce sorn molt of oflfl x12 C ix. 3 C H A P. XII. C Of PUDDINGS or DUMPLINGS. General diretions I20 Makea bread puddingl 2 bread and but- terpudding 121 --- plain pudding I22 - quaking pudding 122 ----rice pudding 122 --ground rice pud- ding - 123 ---marrow pudding 123 ----cftard pudding 123 -plain baked pud- ding - 124 --hunting pudding 124 ---apple pudding 125 ---lemon pudding 125 - orange pudding 126 ---plumb. puddingia6 ----teak pudding 127 --quince, apricot, or white pear plumb pudding iz7 Make tansey pudding 127 ---almond pudding 128 ---sago pudding 128 ---suet pudding 128 --fweetmead pud- ding - 129 ---prune or damson pudding - 129 --manna pudding x29 - potatoc puddingl 30 ---pease pudding 130 -black puddings 130 --white puddings 13 1 - - norfolk dumplingi 32 --apple dumplings 132 ---iuet dumplings. with currants r133 -yeft dumplings 133 - raspberry dump- lings - 133 C H A P. XIII. Of PIES and Observations - 134 Make crisp paste for tarts - 134 ---puff paste - 135 --pa fteforraifedpie 135 - palle for venison p.fties' - 136 ---crul for greatpie 136 --excellent paRe for petty pans 136 ---paste for cuflard 136. TARTS, &c. Make fweetvealorlamb pie - 37 --savory lamb pie 137. ---ieak pie 1.38 --mutton pie - 138 --veal pie - 138 --pigeon pie - 139 -- chicken pie - 139 --giblct pie 139 --- lambpie witihcur- ralto. - 140 r X;' J Mlkae goose pie - 141 --yotillg rook pie 141 -turkey pie - 142z --lanib-ftone and fwveetbread pie 142 --- ha e pie - 142. --rabbit pie - 142 -- venison party 143 -- als's head pie 143 ;pork pie 144 ---minced pie ' 144 ---lent minced pie 1 44 --apple or pearpie 145 -- gooseberry, plumb, or cherry pie i45 Make eel-pie 14f - turbot pie 146 * --lobfterpie 146 -- oyflcr pie 1-47 - trout pie 147. - tarts of various kinds - 1:7 - icing for tarts 148 -- apple orpear tartI48 -- almond tart 149 -- orange tarts 150 --- currants, cherries, goofebcrry, and ap)ricot tarts 15jr C H A P. XIV. Of C A KES, &c. Make a good feed cake - J 5 --pound cil: 151 ---lumb cake 152 - icing for plumb cakeC - 1-52- --fine rich cake I53 --Spanilh cake 1 53 --- Shrewfnbulycake 153 *--cqucn cake 154 ---crecam cake 154 Makegingerbread cak 5'r --lemon cake SS. ---cheese cake 156 --rice cheese cake 156- ---maccaroons 156 ---lemon or orange' cheese cakes. 157 - goods pancakes 157 -- good fiitters 158 --- Bath calke 158 -- wigs 159 CHA P. XV. Of Syllabubs, Creams, and Flummery. Make a fine fvllatbub from the cow 159 ---whipped fylla- l)ubs 159 -line crCeain 160 --lemonI ororange cream - iG M:ke ice cream J 60 --rafplcrry cream 161 ---tiille - 16 t ---flummery I Tr --Frcncliflunmmery i z6 -- good sack pollet I 62 --- wlitc ie wvile IIC . r ;i. ] C H A P. XVL -OfJellies, Jams, and Custards. ·Iake calf's.footjelly 163 - hartflorn je:ly 1 64 --blackcurrant do. 164 -- red currantjelly 164 .--raapberry jam 165 Mlakeblac!:curtantjam 16- ---plain cu'tarlds 66r -aImrondc cullartd 166 --cream ciinlard 166 --orange cu'la-rd 167 C H A P. XVII. Of POTTING and COLLARING. Pot beef 67 Pot lobsters --venison 168 Collar beef -- pigeons or any --brealt of veal other fowls 68 --- loin of mutton --hams and fowls 168 - pok - --charrs or trout 169 --eels or trouts ,C H A P. XVIII. .Of Preserving, Drying and Candying. Keep green pease till Chriflmas 173 i---Frnch beans all the year 173 Bottle goofeberries 1 74 ----damsons 174 Prefcrve peaches 75 ---apricots 75 --grapes - 17; --frtit green . 76 lMake marmalade 176 Preserve plumbs 176 ..cherries wvith their leaves and Italks green 177 --currants 177 ---v afpberries 178 Dry damsons 178 --peoclhes . - 7 ---cherrics - 179 Candy angelica 179 -- ginger .- 179 C H A P. XIX. Of P I C K L I NG. Pickle mufnllooms -.--red cabLage iRo Pickle walnults 180 -- ctucumbers x69 170 170 171 171 .172 - iSi 1aJ c xil. 3 Pickle walnuts - 181 up - 86 - cucumbers 181 Pickle to keep 186 --onions 182 --pork to eat soon i 87 --beet-root 182 --mackerel 187 --nafturtian buds --herrings 187 or feeds - 182 --oysters, cockles, - rock samphire 183 and muscles 188 - French beans 183 --flirimps 189 --grapes or berries 184 - smelt - 189 Make mangoes 184 --- falmor - I90 Picklepurplecabbage 184 Cure bacon - 190 Make gooseberry vine- --Wefiphalia ham 19 gar - 85 i --tongue - 191 -- mushroom catch- - mutton hams 192 CHAP. XX. Of Made Wines, and-Cordial Waters. Observations 192 Makegoofeberry wine 93 - currant wine 193 - raisin wine 194 -blackberry wine i94 --raspberry wine 195 --morella wine 196 -mulberry wine 196 -elderberry wine 197 -elderflower wine 197 --orange wine 1 98 - frontiniac wine 198 - balm wine - 199 --- ginger wine 199 ---sage wine - 200 mead wine 200oo -: birch wine 201 Cyprus wine imitated2o Make faragofa wine, or English sack 202 ---clary wine - 202 Bill of Fare for each Montl Make lemon wine 2o3 --cowslip wine 203 --blackcurrant do.204 --Eng.champagne 204 --damson wine 205 - blackcherry bran- dy - - 205 --shrub - 206 - orange shrub 206 --raspberry brandy2o6 -orange brandy 207 --lemon brandy 207 - fine milk punch 207 Rcefore pricked wines2o8 Fine wineLifbon way2o8 Clear wine - 208 Makepeppermintdo. 209 - cordial water 209 ---lavender water 209 --black cherry do. 2o ---rose water - 2 10 hi in the Year - a1 e. , THE COOK MAID'S ASSISTANT, OR, THE WHOLE ART OF COOKERY, MADE PLAIN 'AND EASY. INS TR UC IONS for AMARK IfETING. How go clhoofe Bcef. IF the beef be young, it will be smooth and tender; if old, it generally appears rough and fpungy. If Ox, and proper age, the lean willbe ofa darkinf red, and marbled in the grain, which may be seen at the lean part of the thin end of the furloin, or at the cutting of the fore- chine. The far of Cow Beef-is whiter, and the lean a pale red. To c.$oofe MutIon. To judge Mutton, you muf look at the lean part, where.the fore quarter is cut off from the hind, and it will be marbled with fat, and the B lean * - ( 2 ) lean of a dark red; confequcr.tly in perfection as it will be about five years old : but if young, it will net be so mixcd in the grain ; and the lean cf a pale red. If the fat be inclinable to yellow, it is tainted in the feeding. To cl ofie Veal. When the fcifh of a joint of veal seems clam- my, an( has greenish or yellowifl specks, it is Piale; The loin firfl taints under the kidney. The neck and breast taint firfl at the upper end. The eflie of a bull calf is redder and firmer than that of a cow calf, and the fat harder; but always choose quey veal. To choose Lamb. If a hind quarter of lamb has a faint smell under tlhe kidney, and tle knuckle be limber, _itis stale meat. If the neck vein of a fore quar- ter be of an azure colour, it is nlew and good meat; but if greenill or yellowifl, the meat is nearly tainted. To choose Pork. For roatilng buy a small Pork Pig, th, lean mtult he near as fine as veal in the .grainl; the fait Lirm and of a fine white colour. If tih. lIeau be rcdtdi(ll and tle fat yellow, it is tainted, or I.as no1t blcln properly attended to in feeding. l'or ( 3 ) For boiling, let your pork be fatter than roasting, and a fine grain. Io cos./ BSrainvt. 'Tlick brawn is old, the moderate is young. If the rind and fat be very tender, it is not boar brawn, but barrow or sow. o% choose Bacon. If the fat is white, oily to the touch, and does not break, the bacon is good, especially if the flell is of a good colour and flicks well to the bone; but if contrary Cymptoms appear, and tile lean has Come yellowifl ftrcaks, it is or soon will be rusty. I'o cbofe HuTmsr. You must run a knife under the bone that ticks out of the ham, and if it comes out pretty clean, and has a nice flavour, the ham is sweet andl good; if much dulled and fineared, it is tainted and rancid. 'o cofe r n'ion. Try the haunches or lBoulders under the bones that come out, with your finger or knife, and as the fccnt is sweet or rank, it is new or {tale and the like of the fides in the molt eflih parts; 13 z if ( 4 ) if taii.,ti they will look greenish in tome places, or very black. Look on the hoofs, and if the clefts are very wide and rough it is old, if close andl Imooth it is young. To chfJ3aje fars and Rabbits. A hare when newly killed, is stiff and whitish; when stale, the body is limber, and the flesh in many parts blackinl. If the hare be old, the ears will be tough and dry, and the claws wide arid ragged ; if young, the claws will be finooth, and the ears will tear like a piece of brown pa- per. Rabbits, when stale, are limber and slimy; when fresh, stiff and white; when young, their claws are fnooth; when old, the contrary. To choose Poultry. A Cock or Capon, &c. If they are young, their spurs are fliort and dubbed; but take particular notice they are not pared or scraped. If the hen is old her legs and comb are rough; if young, finooth. A Turkey. If the cock be young, his legs will be black and smooth, and his spurs fllort; if stale his eyes will be funk in his head, and his feet dry ; if new, the eyes lively and liimber. For the hen observe the fame direcions; and if file is with egg, flie will have a soft open vent; if not a hard close one. A ( 5 ) A Goose. If the bill is yellowish, and llas but few hairs, it is young; but if full of lair., and the bill and foot red,.it is old ; if fresh, linl- her footed ; if stale dry footed. Duicks, wild or tame. If flref, limber foot- ed; if ftalc, dry footed. A true wild duck has a reddifl foot, and smaller than the tame one To choofJe Pigeonr. The dove house pigeons when old, are red- legged; when new and fat, limber footed and feel full in the vent; when itale their vents are green and flabby. Poultry in Seaft.r. anrtuary. -Ien turkeys, capons, pullets witfi eggs, fowls, chickens, hares, all forts of wild fowl, tame rabbits and tame pigeons. iebruary. Turkeys, &c. as above, in this month begin to decline, green gcfeC young ducklings, and turkey poults. rMarch. 'llTis month the fame as the pre- ceeding months; only wild fowl goes quite out. April. Pullets, spring fowls, chickens, pige. ons, young wild rabbits, leverets, young gecfe, ducklings, and turkey poults. AZay and 7run' tile fame. J,7/),y The fame with young partridges, B 3 pheafaits, pheafarts, and wild ducks, called flappers or moulters. Alugzi the fame. September, Olober, November, and December. In these mon[hs all forts of fowls, both wild and tame,