Great Society

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Editor: Stanley I. Kutler
Date: 2003
Dictionary of American History
From: Dictionary of American History(Vol. 4. 3rd ed.)
Publisher: Charles Scribner's Sons
Document Type: Topic overview
Pages: 2
Content Level: (Level 5)
Lexile Measure: 1470L

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Page 57

GREAT SOCIETY

GREAT SOCIETY, the program of liberal reform put forward by President Lyndon Johnson in his 1964 commencement address at the University of Michigan that proposed expanding the size and scope of the federal

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Architect of the Great Society. President Lyndon Johnson and the first lady, Lady Bird Johnson, take part in a State Department "Salute to Congress," 7 October 1965. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Architect of the Great Society. President Lyndon Johnson and the first lady, Lady Bird Johnson, take part in a State Department "Salute to Congress," 7 October 1965. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

government to diminish racial and economic inequality and improve the nation's quality of life. Johnson sponsored legislation that strengthened African American voting rights and banned discrimination in housing and public service provision. The WAR ON POVERTY, a collection of community empowerment and job programs, directed resources toward the inner cities and the MEDICARE AND MEDICAID programs provided health insurance to the poor and elderly, respectively. While many Great Society programs were subsequently abandoned, in the early 2000s, Democrats continued to defend the social insurance and civil rights changes Johnson enacted.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Andrews, John A. Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1998.

Richard M. Flanagan

Source Citation

Source Citation   

Gale Document Number: GALE|CX3401801787