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Literature CriticismResults for Basic Search(1,003)

  • Search Terms: Basic Search (flannery o'connor)
 
 
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    Critical essay
    Gene Kellogg. The Vital Tradition: The Catholic Novel in a Period of Convergence. Loyola University Press, 1970. p180-205. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 3.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1975.  Word Count: 253. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.The vision of "true depravity" with which [Flannery O’- Connor] works [in her short story "The Artificial Nigger"] is Jansenist, as Jansenism has filtered into and been reinforced by the American Catholic Puritan... 
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    Warren Coffey. Commentary Vol. 40, Issue 5. (Nov. 1965): p93-99. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Sharon R. Gunton. Vol. 21.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1982.  Word Count: 2468. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.WARREN COFFEY We now have all the work by which Flannery O'Connor will be remembered in the world. Of her last stories, collected in Everything That Rises Must Converge, it is certainly the just praise, and maybe the... 
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    Thelma J. Shinn. and the Violence of Grace, in Contemporary Literature Vol. 9, Issue 1. (Winter 1968): p58-73. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley and Phyllis Carmel Mendelson. Vol. 6.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1976.  Word Count: 470. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.O'CONNOR, (Mary) Flannery 1925-1964 Miss O'Connor was an American novelist, short story writer, and essayist whose work is at the center of the Southern Renascence. The groundnote of Miss O'Connor's fiction was her... 
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    Josephine Gattuso Hendin. Columbia Forum Vol. 13, Issue 1. (Spring 1970): p38-41. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Sharon R. Gunton. Vol. 21.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1982.  Word Count: 710. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.JOSEPHINE GATTUSO HENDIN The great strength of O'Connor's fiction seems to me to spring from the silent and remote rage that erupts from the quiet surface of her stories and that so unexpectedly explodes It appears, for... 
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    Saul Maloff. Commonweal. (Aug. 8, 1969): p490-491. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 3.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1975.  Word Count: 369. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.O'CONNOR, Flannery 1925-1964 A Southern American novelist and short story writer, Miss O'Connor was a fundamentalist Christian moralist whose powerful apocalyptic fiction is central to the Southern Renascence. Her... 
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    Mark G. Edelstein. and the Problem of Modern Satire, in Studies in Short Fiction. (Spring 1975): p139-144. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley and Phyllis Carmel Mendelson. Vol. 6.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1976.  Word Count: 1069. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.[The] fact that reality now seems to satirize itself does not mean that the modern satirist is out of business. It simply means that the . . . satirist must create his own world in order to make the fantasy work, that... 
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    Leonard Casper. The Shaken Realist: Essays in Modern Literature in Honor of Frederick J. Hoffman. Louisiana State University, 1970. p287-299. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley and Phyllis Carmel Mendelson. Vol. 6.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1976.  Word Count: 271. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.The work of Flannery O'Connor is remarkably free of morbidity because, like Greek tragedy or Christian myth, her attention is less on catharsis and loss than on transfiguration; less on the fact of death than on its... 
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    Melvin J. Friedman. English Journal. (Apr. 1962): p233-243. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 1.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1973.  Word Count: 723. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.In a certain sense Flannery O'Connor has replaced Carson McCullers as the image of the young writer; although her face is perhaps more rounded and less "dreaming and-ogynous" than her older contemporary, she still... 
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    A. L. Rowse. in Books and Bookmen. (May 1972): p38-39. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley and Barbara Harte. Vol. 2.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1974.  Word Count: 500. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.The greatest literary discovery that I have made in years of going to America has been the work of Flannery O’- Connor. She is already recognised as a classic over there, though not wholly understood. Outside she... 
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    Preston M. Browning. Modern Fiction Studies. (Spring 1973): p29-41. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 3.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1975.  Word Count: 1227. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.Surely one of the major reasons Flannery O'Connor is held in such high esteem is the success with which she dramatizes religious themes in a fiction for the most part free of the taint of propagandistic motives. Yet the... 
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    Bill Oliver. Flannery O'Connor Bulletin Vol. 15. (1986): p1-15. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Janet Witalec. Vol. 132.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 2003.  Word Count: 6097. From 20th Century Literature Criticism Online.In the following essay, Oliver analyzes O'Connor's unique sense of compassion in A Temple of the Holy Ghost, The Artificial Nigger, Parker's Back, and Judgment Day. [In the following essay, Oliver analyzes O'Connor's... 
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    Walter Sullivan. The Southern Humanities Review Vol. 2, Issue 3. (Summer 1968): p303-309. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Sharon R. Gunton. Vol. 21.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1982.  Word Count: 1822. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.WALTER SULLIVAN At her death in 1964, Flannery O'Connor left two novels and nineteen short stories and on these her hterary reputation finally must rest. The novels, however, are not finished works of art Both are... 
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    Theodore Solotaroff. The Red Hot Vacuum and Other Pieces on the Writing of the Sixties. Atheneum, 1970. p171-177. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 1.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1973.  Word Count: 218. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.[Because Flannery O'Connor] had such a quick, deft, animating touch that brought her characters and milieu to life by means of a few details and the flick of a metaphor, it is easy to forget that she was not portraying... 
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    Elizabeth Bishop. The New York Review of Books Vol. 111, Issue 4. (Oct. 8, 1964): p21. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Sharon R. Gunton and Laurie Lanzen Harris. Vol. 15.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1980.  Word Count: 89. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.ELIZABETH BISHOP I am sure [Flannery O'Connor's] few books will live on and on in American literature. They are narrow, possibly, but they are clear, hard, vivid, and full of bits of description, phrases, and odd... 
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    Michael Raiger. Seeing Into the Life of Things: Essays on Literature and Religious Experience. Ed. John L. Mahoney. New York: Fordham University Press, 1998. p242-270. Rpt. in Short Story Criticism.
    Ed. Janet Witalec. Vol. 61.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 2003.  Word Count: 12714. From Short Story Criticism Online.In the following essay, Raiger explores O'Connor's use of modern forms, particularly the grotesque and the sublime, in her short fiction. New York: Fordham University Press, 1998. [In the following essay, Raiger explores... 
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    Elizabeth Hardwick. The New York Review of Books Vol. 111, Issue 4. (Oct. 8, 1964): p21. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Sharon R. Gunton and Laurie Lanzen Harris. Vol. 15.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1980.  Word Count: 496. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.ELIZABETH HARDWICK Flannery O'Connor was a brilliant writer. Her fiction was, above all, unexpected and disturbing and she herself was an unexpected, extraordinary person, not much like other people. ... I remember that... 
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    Louise Y. Gossett. Violence in Recent Southern Fiction. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 1.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1973.  Word Count: 104. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.The Southern milieu [in Miss O'Connor's work] is a convenience to make articulate the moral hazards of all contemporary life If the outlandishness of the characters nullifies the empathic identification which a reader... 
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    Lewis A. Lawson. Renascence. (Spring 1965): p137-147. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 1.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1973.  Word Count: 596. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.Offering itself as the most grotesque work in all of Southern fiction, Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood is a novel only in the widest possible sense of the word. It is a prose fiction of considerable length, but beyond... 
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    Ruth M. Vande Kieft. Sewanee Review. (Spring 1968): p337-356. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism.
    Ed. Carolyn Riley. Vol. 1.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1973.  Word Count: 165. From Contemporary Literary Criticism Online.In Miss O'Connor's fiction, the religious vision is markedly apocalyptic. According to this vision, everything in life leads to death, and death is revelation. It is exactly in the instant of passing out of time and life... 
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    Russell Kirk. The World and Vol. 1-2, Issue 1. (Jan. 1987): p429-433. Rpt. in Short Story Criticism.
    Ed. Laurie Lanzen Harris and Sheila Fitzgerald. Vol. 1.  Detroit, MI: Gale, 1988.  Word Count: 846. From Short Story Criticism Online.An American historian, political theorist, novelist, and journalist, Kirk is considered one of America's most eminent conservative intellectuals. His works, particularly The Conservative Mind (1953), have provided an...