Reimagining the "public" in public health: Exploring the challenges of and opportunities for public relations research in public health in the Philippines.

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Date: Sept. 2021
From: Public Relations Review(Vol. 47, Issue 3)
Publisher: Elsevier Advanced Technology Publications
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 295 words

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Abstract :

Keywords Philippines; Public health; Stakeholders; Trust; COVID-19; Vaccination Highlights * PR is critical for improving public health in the global South. * PR in public health is characterized based on stakeholders, trust, and process. * As key public health issues, decline in vaccination intake and emerging pandemics were framed as public relations for they involve building and maintaining trust and managing dis-and/misinformation. * As key public health opportunities, tobacco control, advances in science and research, and health consciousness were framed as public relations for they involve managing dis-and/ misinformation and raising awareness and educating the public. Abstract Guided by Wise (2001), this paper broadens conversations about public relations (PR) research in public health especially in the global South. In particular, it explores framing of public health among PR professionals in the Philippines. Drawing insights from issue framing (Hallahan, 1999) and empirical evidence from in-depth and biographical interviews with PR professionals, it found that professionals characterized PR in public health as that of involving stakeholders, trust, and process. On the one hand, decline in vaccination intake and emerging pandemics as key public health issues were framed as public relations for they involve building and maintaining trust and managing dis-and/ misinformation. On the other hand, tobacco control, advances in science and research, and health consciousness as key public health opportunities were framed as public relations for they involve managing dis-and/ misinformation and raising awareness and educating the public. Overall, this paper encourages sustained conversations among PR professionals, healthcare providers, and policy makers to improve public health post COVID-19. Author Affiliation: Department of Communication, 3F, Faculty Center, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila, 1004, Philippines Article History: Received 2 July 2020; Revised 14 January 2021; Accepted 31 March 2021 Byline: Jan Michael Alexandre C. Bernadas [jan.bernadas@dlsu.edu.ph]

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A662598806