The impact of spike mutated variants of SARS-CoV2 [Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Lambda] on the efficacy of subunit recombinant vaccines.

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Date: July-August 2021
Publisher: Contexto
Document Type: Report
Length: 5,724 words
Lexile Measure: 2000L

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Abstract :

Since the first described human infection with SARS-CoV-2 in December of 2019 many sub-unit protein vaccines have been proposed for use in humans. Subunit vaccines use one or more antigens suitable for eliciting a robust immune response. However, the major concern is the efficacy of subunit vaccines and elicited antibodies to neutralize the variants of SARS-CoV-2 like B.1.1.7 (Alpha), B.1.351 (Beta) and P1 (Gamma), B.1.617 (Delta) and C.37 (Lambda). The Spike protein (S) is a potential fragment for use as an antigen in vaccine development. This protein plays a crucial role in the first step of the infection process, as it binds to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor and enters the host cell after binding. Immunization-induced specific antibodies against the receptor binding domain (RBD) may block and effectively prevent virus invasion. The focus of this review is the impact of spike mutated variants of SARS-CoV2 (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Lambda) on the efficacy of subunit recombinant vaccines. To date, a low or no significant impact on vaccine efficacy against Alpha and Delta variants has been reported. Such an impact on vaccine efficacy for Beta, Delta, Gamma, and Lambda variants may be even greater compared to the Alpha variant. Nonetheless, more comprehensive analyses are needed to assess the real impact on vaccine efficacy brought about by SARS-CoV-2 variants.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A681748700