Reward and punishment sensitivity and alcohol use: The moderating role of executive control

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From: Addictive Behaviors(Vol. 39, Issue 5)
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Document Type: Author abstract
Length: 229 words

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Abstract :

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.12.011 Byline: Nienke C. Jonker, Brian D. Ostafin, Klaske A. Glashouwer, Madelon E. van Hemel-Ruiter, Peter J. de Jong Abstract: Reward sensitivity and to a lesser extent punishment sensitivity have been found to explain individual differences in alcohol use. Furthermore, many studies showed that addictive behaviors are characterized by impaired self-regulatory processes, and that individual differences related to alcohol use are moderated by executive control. This is the first study that explores the potential moderating role of executive control in the relation between reward and punishment sensitivity and alcohol use. Participants were 76 university students, selected on earlier given information about their alcohol use. Half of the participants indicated to drink little alcohol and half indicated to drink substantial amounts of alcohol. As expected, correlational analyses showed a positive relationship between reward sensitivity and alcohol use and a negative relation between punishment sensitivity and alcohol use. Regression analysis confirmed that reward sensitivity was a significant independent predictor of alcohol use. Executive control moderated the relation between punishment sensitivity and alcohol use, but not the relation between reward sensitivity and alcohol use. Only in individuals with weak executive control punishment sensitivity and alcohol use were negatively related. The results suggest that for individuals with weak executive control, punishment sensitivity might be a protective factor working against substantial alcohol use.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A364242281