Association of Dietary Patterns with Cognitive Function and Cognitive Decline in Sydney Memory and Ageing Study: A Longitudinal Analysis.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Clinical report
Length: 528 words

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Keywords Dementia; Cognition; Dietary pattern; Legumes and nuts Abstract Background The relationship of dietary patterns to cognitive health in older adults has attracted much research attention. However, results from existing studies are inconclusive. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary patterns and overall cognitive performance and cognitive change over time. Design This analysis was conducted as part of the longitudinal Sydney Memory and Ageing study with 6 years' follow-up. Mediterranean diet and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet scores were generated based on dietary intake for each individual, assessed by the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies Version 2. Participants/setting This longitudinal study comprised 1037 community dwelling nondemented participants aged 70 to 90 years at baseline (September 2005 to December 2007), recruited from Sydney, Australia. Main outcome measures Neuropsychological tests assessed global cognition and 6 cognitive domains on 4 occasions, at baseline and 2, 4, and 6 years later. Statistical analyses performed Linear mixed-model analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between dietary scores, food components, and overall cognitive function and cognitive change over 6 years. Results No associations of Mediterranean or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension dietary scores with overall cognition and cognitive decline over 6 years were found. Higher intake of legumes and nuts was related to better overall performance in global cognition ([beta] = .091; 95% CI: 0.035-0.146; P = .001) and to multiple cognitive domains and to less decline in global cognition ([beta] = -.016; 95% CI: -0.032 to -0.001; P = .032). Conclusion Study findings suggest that greater consumption of legumes and nuts may be important to slow cognitive decline with age. Author Affiliation: (1) Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration, School of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, the University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia (2) Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre, the University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia (3) Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia (4) Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, the University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia (5) Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia * Address correspondence to: Henry Brodaty, MD, DSc, Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration, School of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, the University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia. Article History: Received 31 October 2020; Accepted 17 October 2021 (footnote) Supplementary materials: and and , , , , , , , , , , , , and are available at www.jandonline.org(http://www.jandonline.org) (footnote) STATEMENT OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST Henry Brodaty is an Advisory Board member for Nutricia Australia. Perminder Sachdev is Advisory Committee member for Biogen Australia. None declared by other authors. (footnote) FUNDING/SUPPORT Sydney Memory and Ageing Study received funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia (Grant Number ID350833, ID568969). The funding agency had no role in the design, analysis, and interpretation of data or writing of this article. (footnote)* Fiona O'Leary and Henry Brodaty are equal senior authors. Byline: Xi Chen, PhD (1), Zhixin Liu, PhD (2), Perminder S. Sachdev, MD, PhD (3,4), Nicole A. Kochan, PhD (4), Fiona O'Leary, PhD (5,*), Henry Brodaty, MD, DSc [h.brodaty@unsw.edu.au] (4,*,*)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A700982605