A Qualitative Analysis of the Remote Food Photography Method and the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Dietary Assessment Tool for Assessing Children's Food Intake Reported by Parent Proxy.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report
Length: 653 words

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Keywords Dietary assessment; Dietary recall; Participant burden; Qualitative research; Parent Abstract Background Accuracy and participant burden are two key considerations in the selection of a dietary assessment tool for assessing children's full-day dietary intake. Objective The aim of this study was to identify barriers experienced by parents and burden when using two technology-based measures of dietary intake to report their child's intake: the Remote Food Photography Method (RFPM) and the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Dietary Assessment Tool (ASA24). Design Qualitative, semistructured, focus groups were conducted with parents who served as proxy reporters of their child's dietary intake using the two different dietary assessment methods (ie, RFPM and ASA24) 1 week apart. Participants/setting This study was conducted in 2019 and included 32 parents of children aged 7 to 8 years in Colorado and Louisiana. Main outcome measures Barriers adhering to the protocol and burden with the RFPM and ASA24. Qualitative analyses Qualitative content analysis and Atlas.ti software were used to analyze and interpret focus group data. Results For the RFPM, parents described missing photos due to unobserved intake, forgetting to capture images, disruption of mealtimes, and child embarrassment when meals were photographed at school. For the ASA24, parents described the time commitment as the main source of burden and the need to expand the food database to include additional ethnic foods and restaurant items. The main strengths were ease of use for the RFPM and the consolidated workload for the ASA24. Conclusions The barriers experienced by parents and burden differed by method, highlighting the importance of considering the unique characteristics of each assessment tool when designing a pediatric dietary assessment study and interpreting findings. Author Affiliation: (1) Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes Center, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado (2) Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado (3) Section of Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz (4) Ingestive Behavior, Weight Management & Health Promotion Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (5) Human Phenotyping Core, Nutrition Obesity Research Center, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana * Address correspondence to: Traci A. Bekelman, PhD, MPH, Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 12474 E 19th Ave, F426, Aurora, CO 80045. Article History: Received 26 April 2021; Accepted 1 November 2021 (footnote) STATEMENT OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST Pennington Biomedical Research Center/Louisiana State University has interest in the intellectual property surrounding the Remote Food Photography Method and SmartIntake app and C. K. Martin is an inventor of the technology. (footnote) FUNDING/SUPPORT Research reported in this publication was supported by the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program, Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health, under Awards U2COD023375 (Coordinating Center), U24OD023382 (Data Analysis Center), U24OD023319 (PRO Core), UH3OD023248 (University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus), and 5U2COD023375 (ECHO Opportunities and Infrastructure Fund). This work was partially supported by Nutrition Obesity Research Center grant P30 DK072476 entitled "Nutrition and Metabolic Health Through the Lifespan" sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and grant U54 GM104940 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, which funds the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science Center. Dr. Glueck was supported by grant No. R01GM121081. Daniel Hsia was supported in part by grant No. 2UG1OD024959, which funds the Louisiana site of the ECHO Institutional Development Award States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health (footnote)* A full list of collaborators appears in the Acknowledgements. Byline: Traci A. Bekelman, PhD, MPH [Traci.Bekelman@cuanschutz.edu] (1,2,*), Susan L. Johnson, PhD (3), Rachel I. Steinberg, MPH (1), Corby K. Martin, PhD (4,5), Katherine A. Sauder, PhD (1,2,3), Sophie Luckett-Cole, MPH (1,2), Deborah H. Glueck, PhD (1,3), Daniel S. Hsia, MD (4), Dana Dabelea, MD, PhD (1,2,3), P.B. Smith, K.L. Newby, D.K. Benjamin

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A700982606