Population change and external commuting in Canada's rural and small town municipalities: 1996-2001

Citation metadata

Date: Autumn 2005
From: Canadian Journal of Regional Science(Vol. 28, Issue 3)
Publisher: Canadian Regional Science Association
Document Type: Article
Length: 8,586 words
Lexile Measure: 1530L

Document controls

Main content

Article Preview :

Abstracts

C.J.A. MITCHELL: "Population Change and External Commuting in Canada's Rural and Small Town Municipalities: 1996-2001." This paper examines the relationship between population change and external commuting within eight size classes that comprise Canada's rural and small town (RST) municipalities. It finds that population change between 1996 and 2001 has varied much within these classes, with very small (less than 499 residents) and very large (more than 7500) census subdivisions gaining residents at the expense of those that are mid-sized. It also reveals considerable variation in levels of external commuting taking place within these size categories. Larger population size classes demonstrate a much higher percentage of external commuting than do those supported by fewer residents. A comparison of population change and commuting to larger urban areas reveals a weak, but statistically significant, correlation in ali but three of Canada's southern provinces, and in all but the very large and very small population size classes. Other types of migration (in-and out) are assumed to be responsible for this insignificance, although verification of this awaits further study.

Resumes

C.J.A. MITCHELL: ["Population Change and External Commuting in Canada's Rural and Small Town Municipalities: 1996-2001."] <<Mouvement de la population et migration de l'exterieur vers les municipalites des regions rurales et des petites villes de 1996 a 2001.>> Au cours des 25 dernieres annees, un nombre croissant de geographes ont explore la dynamique du mouvement de la population dans les municipalites les plus petites du Canada. Le present travail contribue a la documentation de ce phenomene en examinant la relation entre le mouvement de la population et la migration de l'exterieur [c.-a-d. vers une grande region metropolitaine de recensement (RMR) ou agglomeration de recensement (AR)] dans huit tranches de tailles qui englobent les municipalites des regions rurales et des petites villes du Canada. Quatre objectifs sont traites. Le premier consiste a decrire le mouvement de la population dans les municipalites des regions rurales et des petites villes du Canada de 1971 a 2001. Le deuxieme objectif consiste a grouper les plus petites municipalites du Canada dans l'une de quatre categories comparatives de mouvement de la population (hausse elevee, hausse moderee, perte moderee, perte elevee). Le troisieme objectif consiste a reperer les niveaux de migration de l'exterieur dans chacune de ces categories. L'objectif final consiste a evaluer la correlation entre la migration de l'exterieur et le mouvement de la population pour la periode de 1996 a 2001.

Une analyse des donnees de Statistique Canada confirme qu'une perte de population constituait la norme pour de nombreuses subdivisions de recensement (SDR) se trouvant en dehors des grands centres urbains, de 1971 a 2001. Toutefois, en depit de cette tendance generale, une analyse plus approfondie de la periode de 1996 a 2001 revele qu'un grand nombre des plus petites et des plus grandes municipalites des regions rurales et des petites villes se sont agrandies, aux depens de celles de taille moyenne. De plus, dans quatre territoires (Alberta, Ontario, Manitoba et Nunavut), de nombreuses municipalites (souvent autochtones) ont affiche des...

Source Citation

Source Citation   

Gale Document Number: GALE|A155736158