Advanced endoscopic imaging for dysplasia surveillance in ulcerative colitis

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Date: Jan. 2013
Publisher: Expert Reviews Ltd.
Document Type: Report
Length: 6,059 words
Lexile Measure: 1350L

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Author(s): Talat Bessissow 1 2 , Raf Bisschops [*] 3

Keywords

:

advanced endoscopic imaging; autofluorescence; chromoendoscopy; confocal laser endomicroscopy; dysplasia surveillance; endocytoscopy; narrow band imaging; ulcerative colitis

Medscape: Continuing Medical Education Online

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Medscape, LLC and Expert Reviews Ltd. Medscape, LLC is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Medscape, LLC designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) [trademark]. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

All other clinicians completing this activity will be issued a certificate of participation. To participate in this journal CME activity: (1) review the learning objectives and author disclosures; (2) study the education content; (3) take the post-test with a 70% minimum passing score and complete the evaluation at www.medscape.org/journal/expertob; (4) view/print certificate.

Release date: 24/12/2012; Expiration date: 24/12/2013

Learning objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

* Analyze the nature of colonic neoplasia in cases of UC.

* Assess the use of chromoendoscopy as surveillance among patients with UC.

* Evaluate the use of virtual chromoendoscopy to screen patients with UC for neoplasia.

* Evaluate other modalities used to screen patients with UC for colonic neoplasia.

Financial & competing interests disclosure

EDITOR

Elisa Manzotti

Publisher, Future Science Group, London, UK

Disclosure: Elisa Manzotti has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

CME AUTHOR

Charles P Vega, MD

Health Sciences Clinical Professor; Residency Director, Department of Family Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.

Disclosure: Charles P Vega, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

AUTHORS AND CREDENTIALS

Talat Bessissow

Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium

Disclosure: T Bessissow received lecture fees from Aptalis and Takeda and consultancy from Abbott. T Bessissow contributed to the conception, drafting, critical revision and final approval of the article for important intellectual content.

Raf Bisschops

Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium

Disclosure: R Bisschops is supported by a research grant from Ipsen and a separate grant from FWO-Vlaanderen. R Bisschops contributed to the conception, drafting, critical revision and final approval of the article for important intellectual content.

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a well-characterized chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The longstanding nature of UC as well as its relapsing and remitting course carry an increased risk for the development of colorectal neoplasia [1] . The cumulative cancer risk was estimated by Eaden et al. to be 8.5 and 17.8% after 20 and 30 years of disease, respectively [2] . In a study by Jess et al. , the risk of neoplasia in a cohort from Olmsted County was estimated to be 5.1% at 15 years and 9.2% at 25 years [3] . These results were corroborated in a recent publication by the same group where UC patients diagnosed between age 0 and 19 years and young adults diagnosed between age 20 and 39 years of age...

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Source Citation   

Gale Document Number: GALE|A312892149