Which STEM majors enroll in online courses, and why should we care? The impact of ethnicity, gender, and non-traditional student characteristics

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Date: Sept. 2015
From: Computers & Education(Vol. 87)
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Document Type: Author abstract; Report
Length: 249 words

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Abstract :

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.06.010 Byline: Claire Wladis, Alyse C. Hachey, Katherine Conway Abstract: Using data from roughly 27,800 undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) majors in the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), this research examines the relationship between race/ethnicity, gender and non-traditional student characteristics and online course enrollment. Hispanic and Black STEM majors were significantly less likely, and female STEM majors significantly more likely, to take online courses even when academic preparation, socioeconomic status (SES), citizenship and English-as-second-language (ESL) status were controlled. Furthermore, non-traditional student characteristics strongly increased the likelihood of enrolling in an online course, more so than any other characteristic, with online enrollment probability increasing steeply as the number of non-traditional factors increased. The impact of non-traditional factors on online enrollment was significantly stronger for STEM than non-STEM majors. Author Affiliation: (a) Borough of Manhattan Community College at the City University of New York, Mathematics Dept., 199 Chambers St., New York, NY 10007, USA (b) The Graduate Center at the City University of New York, Urban Education Dept., 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA (c) Borough of Manhattan Community College at the City University of New York, Teacher Education Dept., 199 Chambers St., New York, NY 10007, USA (d) Borough of Manhattan Community College at the City University of New York, Business Dept., 199 Chambers St., New York, NY 10007, USA Article History: Received 12 February 2015; Revised 29 June 2015; Accepted 29 June 2015

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A434015039