Patient education: plantar fasciitis

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Date: May-June 2013
Publisher: American Chiropractic Association Inc.
Document Type: Article
Length: 839 words
Lexile Measure: 1130L

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Plantar fasciitis, also called "heel pain syndrome," affects approximately 2 million people in the United States each year. Plantar fasciitis can come on gradually as the result of a degenerative process or sudden foot trauma. It can appear in one heel or both. It is generally worse on taking the first few steps in the morning or after prolonged sitting or non-weight-bearing movement. Symptoms can be aggravated by activity and prolonged weight bearing. Obesity, too, is hard on the feet--it can cause plantar pain or it can make that pain worse.

The plantar fascia connects the calcaneal tubercle to the forefoot with five slips directed to each toe respectively. Other conditions, such as calcaneal fat pad atrophy, calcaneal stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and rheumatoid arthritis may also cause foot pain. These conditions may be found in combination with plantar fasciitis, or separate from it. A blood test can help pinpoint the cause(s).

Improper footwear can bring about plantar fasciitis. Such footwear may allow excessive pronation or under-pronation, as well as impaired shock absorption. Pronation is part of a normal gait. The ankle rolls slightly inward after heel strike. Then, the ankle rolls outward as you toe-off from that step. Your foot overpronates, however, when it rolls too far inward....

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A353753436