Family Characteristics Associated with Preparing and Eating More Family Evening Meals at Home.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report
Length: 627 words

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Keywords Ecological momentary assessments; Meals prepared at home; Meal planning; Self-efficacy; Cooking Abstract Background Research has demonstrated dietary quality benefits of family meals and meals prepared at home. Less is known about associations between the proportion of family evening meals made at home and key personal, behavioral, and environmental characteristics. Moreover, most studies often measure these data retrospectively. Objective The objective of this study is to describe the proportion of evening meals made at home measured in real time and to assess associations between personal, behavioral, and environmental characteristics that are associated with a higher proportion of evening meals prepared and consumed at home. Design This study is a cross-sectional secondary analysis of baseline data collected during 2017 and 2018 from the New Ulm at Home study, a randomized controlled trial conducted in rural Minnesota to evaluate the effectiveness of a childhood obesity prevention program for school-aged children. Participants/setting The present study analyzes a subset of the New Ulm at Home trial data from families (N = 108) who completed at least four evening meal screeners collected in real time with ecological momentary assessment technology over a 2-week period. Main outcome measure The main outcome measure was the proportion of family evening meals made at home, calculated using two cutpoints ([less than or equal to]50% of evening meals prepared at home vs 50%; [less than or equal to]70% vs 70%). Statistical analysis Descriptive statistics were used to describe the proportion of evening meals prepared at home. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for parent education were used to assess associations between family characteristics and the two different proportions of meals made at home. Results Most family evening meals were prepared and eaten at home (62%). Logistic regression models indicated meal planning skills (odds ratio=1.19, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.39) and mealtime routines (odds ratio=1.20, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.40) were significantly associated with odds of preparing more than 50% of evening meals at home. Only meal planning skills (odds ratio=1.27, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.51) was significantly associated with odds of preparing more than 70% of evening meals at home. Conclusions Study findings indicated mealtime routines and meal planning skills were associated with preparing more than 50% of evening meals at home, but only meal planning skills were associated with preparing more than 70% of evening meals at home, which may suggest the importance of adapting interventions for families. Future research should build on these findings in randomized controlled trials. Author Affiliation: (1) School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (2) Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (3) Clinical Translational Science Institute Translational Research and Career Training TL1 Program Program and Translational Research Development Program, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis * Address correspondence to: Melissa Horning, PhD, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, 5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455; 612-624-1947. Article History: Received 21 January 2021; Accepted 8 July 2021 (footnote) STATEMENT OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors. (footnote) FUNDING/SUPPORT This study was supported by grant R01 HL123699 (J. Fulkerson, PI) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/National Institutes of Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. This study used REDCap for data collection, which was supported by a Clinical and Translations Science Institute grant (UL1TR002494) from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translations Sciences. (footnote) Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov(http://ClinicalTrials.gov) (NCT02973815). Byline: Melissa L. Horning, PhD [horn0199@umn.edu] (1,*), Sarah Friend, MPH, RD (1), Jiwoo Lee, PhD (1), Colleen Flattum, MS, RD (2), Jayne A. Fulkerson, PhD (3)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A686979914