The partner next door? The effect of micro-geographical proximity on intra-cluster inter-organizational relationships.

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From: Technovation(Vol. 111)
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 354 words

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Keywords Inter-organizational relationships; Knowledge transfer; Venture capital deals; High-tech clusters; Micro-geographical proximity Highlights * We study the role of micro-geographical proximity within a cluster. * We take empirical evidence from the biopharma cluster in the Greater Boston Area, U.S. * We relate micro-geographical proximity to the formation of three types of collaborative ties. * Micro-geographical proximity favors the establishment of VC deals and IP transfer agreements. Abstract: Substantial research has focused on how innovation is influenced by geography from a macro perspective (e.g., at the country, state, or metropolitan level). However, less attention has been paid to how innovation is configured within a cluster from a micro perspective (e.g., at the district or firm level within a city), i.e., the "micro-geographical proximity" within a cluster. With this paper, we aim to "zoom into" a technology cluster to study the role of the inter-organizational micro-geographical proximity for the establishment of knowledge transfer relationships. Specifically, we analyse whether and how the micro-geographical proximity is related to the formation of three different types of inter-organizational relationships: venture capital (VC) deals, intellectual property (IP) transfer agreements, and R&D strategic alliances. We take empirical evidence from the biopharma cluster in the Greater Boston Area. Our findings suggest the importance of micro-geographical proximity for the establishment of VC deals and IP transfer agreements, which emphasizes the importance of adopting a micro-geographical perspective to highlight this "neighbourhood effect", which would not be possible when considering spatial proximity at the macro level. Author Affiliation: (a) Università degli studi di Napoli Parthenope, Department of Management and Quantitative Studies Via Generale Parisi, 32-80133, Napoli - Italy (b) Politecnico di Milano, Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Via Raffaele Lambruschini 4b-20156, Milano - Italy * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 21 May 2020; Revised 10 June 2021; Accepted 8 September 2021 (footnote)â This research has been funded by the "Department of Excellence" grant from the italian Ministry of University and Research obtained by the Department of Management and Quantitative Studies (DISAQ) of the Parthenope University of Naples. Byline: Marco Ferretti [marco.ferretti@uniparthenope.it] (a), Massimiliano Guerini [massimiliano.guerini@polimi.it] (b,*), Eva Panetti [eva.panetti@uniparthenope.it] (a), Adele Parmentola [adele.parmentola@uniparthenope.it] (a)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A695941161