A 2 x 2 model of sociocognitive conflict regulation.

Citation metadata

Date: Mar. 2022
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Document Type: Clinical report; Brief article
Length: 334 words

Document controls

Main content

Abstract :

Keywords Sociocognitive conflict regulation; Concurrence-seeking epistemic regulation; Perceived competence; Social interdependence; Cooperation; Conflict elaboration theory Highlights * A new 2 x 2 model of sociocognitive conflict regulation was proposed. * A new type of regulation, concurrence-seeking epistemic regulation, was identified. * Perceived competence and social interdependence predicted conflict regulation. * Incompetent people adopted concurrence-seeking regulation in cooperative contexts. Abstract While social-cognitive views emphasize the social context in which learning occurs (e.g., Piaget), how incompetent individuals cooperate with their peers remains unclear. In this research, a new type of epistemic regulation, concurrence-seeking epistemic regulation, was proposed, which was hypothesized to be adopted more by low-competence individuals in cooperative contexts. This hypothesis was tested by examining the main effects of perceived competence (high versus low) and social interdependence (cooperation versus competition) on sociocognitive conflict regulation. We aimed to validate a new 2 x 2 model of sociocognitive conflict regulation with dimensions of perceived competence and social interdependence through a randomized experimental design (Study 1: n = 200; Study 2: n = 500) and a field study of undergraduates' small group experiences (Study 3: n = 230). The results generally supported this model with statistically significant main effects of perceived competence and social interdependence as well as construct validity for concurrence-seeking regulation. Specifically, compared to high-competence individuals, low-competence individuals were more likely to use concurrence-seeking regulation; concurrence-seeking regulation was also more used as individuals perceived the context as more cooperative. The results refine the conceptualization of sociocognitive conflict regulation and inform how to support more effective types of conflict regulation. Author Affiliation: (a) Division of Education, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul, South Korea (b) Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education, Michigan State University, USA * Corresponding author at: Sookmyung Women's University, Cheongpa-ro 47-gil 100 (Cheongpa-dong 2(i)-ga), Yongsan-gu, Seoul 04310, South Korea. Article History: Received 12 April 2021; Revised 27 November 2021; Accepted 10 December 2021 (footnote)[white star] This paper has been recommended for acceptance by Michael Kraus. Byline: You-kyung Lee [youkyunglee@sookmyung.ac.kr] (a,*), Cary J. Roseth (b)

Source Citation

Source Citation   

Gale Document Number: GALE|A690060605