Associations of Dairy Intake with Circulating Biomarkers of Inflammation, Insulin Response, and Dyslipidemia among Postmenopausal Women.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report
Length: 933 words

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Keywords Dairy; Dairy fat; Inflammation biomarkers; Insulin; Lipids Abstract Background Cardiometabolic diseases are prevalent in aging Americans. Although some studies have implicated greater intake of dairy products, it is not clear how dairy intake is related to biomarkers of cardiometabolic health. Objective Our aim was to test the hypothesis that associations of dairy foods with biomarkers of lipid metabolism, insulin-like growth factor signaling, and chronic inflammation may provide clues to understanding how dairy can influence cardiometabolic health. Design This was a cross-sectional study in the Women's Health Initiative using baseline food frequency questionnaire data to calculate dairy intake. Participants/setting Participants were 35,352 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years at 40 clinical centers in the United States. Main outcome measures Baseline (1993-1998) concentrations of 20 circulating biomarkers were measured. Statistical analyses Multivariable-adjusted linear regression was used to estimate percent difference in biomarker concentrations per serving of total dairy and individual foods (milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, and low-fat varieties). Results Lower triglyceride concentrations were associated with greater intake of total dairy (--0.8% [95% CI --1.2% to --0.3%]), mainly driven by full-fat varieties. Individual dairy foods had specific associations with circulating lipid components. For example, greater total milk intake was associated with lower concentrations of total cholesterol (--0.4% [95% CI --0.7% to --0.2%]) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (--0.5% [95% CI --0.9% to --0.1%]), whereas greater butter intake was associated with higher total cholesterol (0.6% [95% CI 0.2% to 1.0%]) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.6% [95% CI 1.1% to 2.0%]) concentrations. In contrast, higher total yogurt intake was associated with lower total cholesterol (--1.1% [95% CI --2.0% to --0.2%]) and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.8% [95% CI 0.5% to 3.1%]). Greater total dairy intake (regardless of fat content), total cheese, full-fat cheese, and yogurt were consistently associated with lower concentrations of glucose, insulin, and C-reactive protein. However, milk and butter were not associated with these biomarkers. Conclusions Higher dairy intake, except butter, was associated with a favorable profile of lipids, insulin response, and inflammatory biomarkers, regardless of fat content. Yet, specific dairy foods might influence these markers uniquely. Findings do not support a putative role of dairy in cardiometabolic diseases observed in some previous studies. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Comprehensive Cancer Center--James Cancer Hospital, Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (2) Public Health Honors Program, Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus (3) The Ohio State University, Columbus (4) Comprehensive Cancer Center--James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus (5) Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus (6) Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (7) Division of Women's Health, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Office for Women's Careers, Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (8) Division of Health Behavior Research and Implementation Science, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (9) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, North Seattle, WA (10) Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla (11) Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (12) Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City (13) Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (14) Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH * Address correspondence to: Fred K. Tabung, MSPH, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Comprehensive Cancer Center--James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, and Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Nutrition, Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 410w 12th Ave, Room 302B, Columbus, OH 43220. Article History: Received 21 August 2020; Accepted 25 February 2021 (footnote) STATEMENT OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors. (footnote) FUNDING/SUPPORT F. K. Tabung was supported by National Cancer Institute grant R00 CA207736 and P30 CA016058. J. J. Joseph was supported by grant K23DK117041 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The WHI program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services through contracts HHSN268201600018C, HHSN268201600001C, HHSN268201600002C, HHSN268201600003C, and HHSN268201600004C. (footnote) AUTHOR CONTRIBUTIONS N. Shi and F. K. Tabung designed research. N. Shi performed statistical analyses and drafted the manuscript. Q. Jin and D. Aroke assisted in statistical analyses. F. K. Tabung edited initial manuscript drafts and provided study oversight. S. Olivo-Marston, J. J. Joseph, S. K. Clinton, J. E. Manson, K. M. Rexrode, Y. Mossavar-Rahmani, L. Fels Tinker, A. H. Shadyab, R. S. Arthur, L. G. Snetselaar, L. Van Horn, and F. K. Tabung analyzed and interpreted the data and provided critical intellectual input. All authors approved the final manuscript. N. Shi and F. K. Tabung had full access to all the data and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis and results. Byline: Ni Shi, PhD, MPH (1), Susan Olivo-Marston, PhD, MPH (2), Qi Jin, MS, RD (3), Desmond Aroke, MD (4), Joshua J. Joseph, MD, MPH (5), Steven K. Clinton, MD, PhD (1), JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH (6), Kathryn M. Rexrode, MD, MPH (7), Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, PhD, RD, CDN (8), Lesley Fels Tinker, PhD (9), Aladdin H. Shadyab, PhD, MPH (10), Rhonda S. Arthur, PhD (11), Linda G. Snetselaar, PhD, RDN, FAND, LD (12), Linda Van Horn, PhD (13), Fred K. Tabung, MSPH, PhD [Fred.Tabung@osumc.edu] (1,14,*)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A676152126