Food Acquisition and Shopping Patterns in the United States: Characteristics and Relation to Body Mass Index in the US Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Article
Length: 456 words

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Keywords Shopping distance; Grocery store type; Transportation; Farmers' market; Food bank/pantry Abstract Background Previous studies examined the association between shopping distance, frequency, and store type separately. Objectives The objective is to explore food acquisition and shopping habits using multidimensional measures and examine its association with body mass index (BMI). Design A cross-sectional study was conducted. Participants/setting Four thousand four hundred sixty-six households from the US Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey during April 2012 to January 2013 were included in this analysis. Main outcomes measures Both continuous BMI and categorical BMI were used. Statistical analyses Latent class analysis was used to identify the latent profiles using travel distance and perceived travel time between residential location and primary store, store type, transportation mode, and farmers' market utilization. Multivariable linear regression and multinomial logistic regression were used to assess the association between the identified patterns and continuous and categorical BMI. All analyses were stratified by urbanicity. Results Overall, 65% (weighted percentage) of households were located in an urban tract. Thirty-seven percent were categorized as Class 1 (households that shopped more proximally, used their own vehicle, and shopped at a farmers' market), 50% as Class 2 (households that shopped more distally, used their own vehicle, and shopped at a farmers' market), and 14% as Class 3 (households that shopped proximally but perceived longer travel time, used someone else's vehicle, and did not shop at a farmers' market). Among rural households, 54% were Class 1 and 46% were Class 2 (Class 3 was not identified). Socioeconomic status characteristics, proximity, and store food price concerns were associated with the identified patterns. However, no significant association was found between the identified patterns and BMI. Conclusions Food acquisition and shopping patterns were not associated with BMI in this national sample. However, future studies should also investigate the role of economic factors, such as food prices, in relation to shopping patterns and BMI. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina (2) College of Social Work, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina (3) School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland * Angela D. Liese, PhD, MPH, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene St, Columbia, SC 29208. Article History: Received 11 March 2020; Accepted 16 September 2021 (footnote) Supplementary materials: and and are available at www.jandonline.org(http://www.jandonline.org) (footnote) STATEMENT OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors. (footnote) FUNDING/SUPPORT There is no funding to disclose. Byline: Xiaonan Ma, PhD, MPhil (1), Bethany A. Bell, PhD, MPH (2), Kellee White, PhD, MPH (3), Jihong Liu, PhD, MPH (1), Angela D. Liese, PhD, MPH [liese@sc.edu] (1,*)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A697070973