Covid-19 vaccination, fear and anxiety: Evidence from Google search trends.

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Date: Mar. 2022
From: Social Science & Medicine(Vol. 297)
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 300 words

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Abstract :

Keywords Covid-19 vaccination; Economic anxiety; Health beliefs; Mental models Highlights * Covid-19 vaccination was associated with a general feeling of hesitancy. * We show that with the vaccine's arrival, the Google search trends measuring fear and anxiety are increasing. * Anxiety increased when the delta variant was discovered in India. * Policy makers should focus on increasing the number of older adults willing to receive the vaccine. Abstract Covid-19 vaccination was associated with a general feeling of hesitancy, and its arrival increased fear and economic anxiety. This paper investigates the impacts of Covid-19 vaccination on fear and economic anxiety using a worldwide sample of 194 countries observed from December 1st, 2020 to March 4th, 2021. The difference-in-differences investigation approach shows that with the vaccine's arrival, the Google search trends measuring fear and anxiety are increasing. The arrival of the vaccine has created a general feeling of fear, and people have a lack of confidence in the vaccine's efficiency to overcome the Covid-19 crisis. Specifically, anxiety increased when the delta variant was discovered in India. Governments' interventions must ensure that the Covid-19 vaccine does not have adverse side effects that can harm public health. We suggested that policy makers should focus on increasing the number of older adults willing to receive the vaccine. It can be effective in explaining the benefits of the vaccine, and denying false information about the vaccine and its serious side effects. Author Affiliation: (a) IPAG Paris Business School, France (b) OCRE Lab, EDC Paris Business School, Paris, France (c) IPAG Paris Business School, Paris, France (d) International School, VietNam National University, Hanoi, Viet Nam * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 13 December 2021; Revised 2 February 2022; Accepted 13 February 2022 Byline: Haithem Awijen [haithem.awijen@gmail.com] (a), Younes Ben Zaied [ybenzaied@edcparis.edu] (b,*), Duc Khuong Nguyen [duc.nguyen@ipag.fr] (c,d)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A696649693