The reciprocal longitudinal relationship between body mass index and subjective well-being in China.

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From: Social Science & Medicine(Vol. 297)
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Clinical report; Brief article
Length: 373 words

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Keywords Body mass index; Subjective well-being; Longitudinal relationship Highlights * BMI and SWB are positively associated at the population level. * One's BMI levels positively influence subsequent SWB values, and vice versa. * The mutual process implies psychosocial burden of obesity may not hold in China. Abstract The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and subjective well-being (SWB) has been widely discussed in empirical literature. However, most previous studies were cross-sectional and inadequate to assess directionality. The current study examines the prospective relationship between BMI and SWB by analyzing nationally representative longitudinal data from 2009 to 2015. Eligible subjects were those who participated in a three-wave measurement (n = 18,443, age 13--99 years). We used a random-intercept cross-lagged panel model (RI-CLPM) to investigate the dynamic relationship between BMI and SWB, controlling for covariate effects. Results indicated that BMI and SWB were positively associated at the population level, and there was a reciprocal relationship at the individual level. An individual's BMI levels positively influenced his or her subsequent SWB values, with effects ranging from 0.15 (95% CI: 0.09--0.22) to 0.16 (95% CI: 0.09--0.24). At the same time, an individual's SWB levels positively influenced subsequent BMI values, with effects ranging from 0.12 (95% CI: 0.08--0.17) to 0.17 (95% CI: 0.10--0.24). This mutual reinforcement process supports the "jolly fat" hypothesis from a longitudinal perspective, implying that the psychosocial burden of excess weight may not hold in China. The implications are that mental health interventions could help prevent the risk of being underweight, and nutritional care would contribute to the creation of a happier society. Author Affiliation: (a) School of Psychology and Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, China (b) Key Laboratory of Brain, Cognition and Education Sciences (SCNU), Ministry of Education, China, School of Psychology and Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, China (c) School of Foreign Languages, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China * Corresponding author. School of Psychology, South China Normal University, West of Zhongshan Avenue, Tianhe District, Guangzhou City, Guangdong province, 510631, China. Article History: Received 9 September 2021; Revised 13 February 2022; Accepted 15 February 2022 Byline: Junyan Fang (a,b), Zhonglin Wen [wenzl@scnu.edu.cn] (a,b,*), Jinying Ouyang (a,b), Guomin Huang (a,b), Xiqin Liu (c)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A696649696