Research Highlights

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Date: Jan. 2011
From: Nanomedicine(Vol. 6, Issue 1)
Publisher: Future Medicine Ltd.
Document Type: Report
Length: 1,842 words
Lexile Measure: 1380L

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Author(s): John W Stone 1 , James E Crowe [[dagger]] 2

Evaluation of: Krpetic Z, Nativo P, Sée V, Prior IA, Brust M, Volk M: Inflicting controlled nonthermal damage to subcellular structures by laser-activated gold nanoparticles. Nano Lett. 10, 4549-4554 (2010).

A current goal in the field of nanomedicine is to develop tools for the manipulation of intracellular structures in live cells using relatively noninvasive procedures. A suitable metaphor for this approach might be termed 'intracellular surgery', in cases where ablation or destruction of a structure is desired. There are several obstacles to such an approach. First, it is difficult to deliver artificial nanoscale devices to particular locations inside live cells with high specificity. Without precision in this step, any attempts at delivering destructive interventions is likely to result in off-target effects and unintended toxicity. Second, it is not trivial to activate intracellular nanoparticles for functional activity using remotely controlled devices outside cells or tissues. A common current approach - remote delivery of destructive energy - is the delivery of thermal changes caused by laser activation of nanoparticles (plasmonic photothermal therapy). However, thermal activity may be difficult to control in cells. The article under evaluation explores an alternate mechanism of destruction or alteration of intracellular structures. The authors took advantage of the fact that citrate-coated gold nanoparticles are taken up in cultured cells into the endosomal compartment. HeLa cells containing approximately 35,000 15-nm gold nanoparticles in endosomes were exposed to continuous green laser light at 20 Wcm-2 or even lower. These illumination intensities, which are lower than conventional experiments associated with rapid cell death, resulted in cell survival and less than 1°C thermal effects, but local destruction of endosomal membranes as visualized by transmission electron microscope. Preliminary data suggest that the localized effect correlated with a rise in reactive oxygen species, rather than thermal effects.

Author Affiliation(s):

[1] Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA

2 james.e.crowe@vanderbilt.edu

Author Note(s):

[dagger] Author for correspondence

Financial & competing interests disclosure

The authors have no relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript. This includes employment, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, grants or patents received or pending, or royalties.

No writing assistance was utilized in the production of this manuscript

Ablation of subcellular structures using laser-induced reactive oxygen species

Evaluation of: Krpetic Z, Nativo P, Sée V, Prior IA, Brust M, Volk M: Inflicting controlled nonthermal damage to subcellular structures by laser-activated gold nanoparticles. Nano Lett. 10, 4549-4554 (2010).

A current goal in the field of nanomedicine is to develop tools for the manipulation of intracellular structures in live cells using relatively noninvasive procedures. A suitable metaphor for this approach might be termed 'intracellular surgery', in cases...

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A245118645