Demystifying the non-linear effect of high commitment work systems (HCWS) on firms' strategic intention of exploratory innovation: An extended resource-based view.

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From: Technovation(Vol. 116)
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 360 words

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Keywords High commitment work systems; Strategic intention of exploratory innovation; Technological opportunity; Extended resource-based view Highlights * High commitment work systems (HCWS) take proactive role in strategic intention of exploratory innovation (SIEI). * HCWS have an inverted U-shaped relation with SIEI. * TO positively moderates the nonlinear relation between HCWS and SIEI. * Science-based TO positively moderates the nonlinear relation between HCWS and SIEI. * Market-based TO positively moderates the linear relation between HCWS and SIEI. Abstract Drawing on the extended resource-based view (RBV), this paper attempts to test the proactive role of high commitment work systems (HCWS) in affecting firms' strategic intention of exploratory innovation, and the moderating effect of technological opportunity (TO). Multi-sourced survey data from Chinese firms in high-tech and manufacturing industries are used to test the hypotheses. The results show that HCWS have an inverted U-shaped relationship with firms' strategic intention of exploratory innovation, and TO positively moderates such a non-linear relationship. By further decomposing TO into science-based (SBTO) and market-based (MBTO), the findings suggest that SBTO positively moderates the non-linear relationship between HCWS and firms' strategic intention of exploratory innovation, while MBTO only positively moderate the linear relationship between them. These findings enrich the understanding of how HCWS affect firms' strategic intention of exploratory innovation by highlighting the double-edged sword roles of HCWS, as well as TO's asymmetrically moderating effect, respectively. Author Affiliation: (a) University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, 100029, China (b) Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029, China (c) Discipline of International Business, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (d) School of Management and Marketing, Faculty of Business and Law, Curtin University, Perth, Australia (e) Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK (f) School of Business and Management, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, England, UK * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 20 October 2020; Revised 13 November 2021; Accepted 1 March 2022 (footnote)[white star] We would like to thank Dr. Stelvia Matos (the Co-Editor in Chief) and anonymous reviewers for their very helpful comments. Byline: Jian-xun Chen [jxunch@uibe.edu.cn] (a), Bo Zhang [bzhang@mail.buct.edu.cn] (b,*), Wu Zhan [wu.zhan@sydney.edu.au] (c), Piyush Sharma [piyush.sharma@curtin.edu.au] (d), Pawan Budhwar [p.s.budhwar@aston.ac.uk] (e), Hui Tan [Hui.Tan@rhul.ac.uk] (f)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A710955473