Emotional response inhibition to self-harm stimuli interacts with momentary negative affect to predict nonsuicidal self-injury urges.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 336 words

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Keywords Nonsuicidal self-injury; Inhibitory control; Emotional stop-signal task; Urgency; Negative affect; Ecological momentary assessment Highlights * We investigated emotional response inhibition to self-harm stimuli (ERI). * ERI did not have a main effect on the momentary NSSI urge strength. * ERI interacted with momentary negative affect (NA) to predict NSSI urge strength. * ERI deficits may pose vulnerability for NSSI urges during real-time NA states. Abstract The current study investigated whether impaired emotional response inhibition to self-harm stimuli is a risk factor for real-time nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) urges. Participants were 60 university students with a history of repetitive NSSI. At baseline, participants completed an emotional stop-signal task assessing response inhibition to self-harm stimuli. Participants subsequently completed an ecological momentary assessment protocol in which they reported negative affect, urgency, and NSSI urge intensity three times daily over a ten-day period. Impaired emotional response inhibition to self-harm stimuli did not evidence a main effect on the strength of momentary NSSI urges. However, emotional response inhibition to self-harm images interacted with momentary negative affect to predict the strength of real-time NSSI urges, after adjusting for emotional response inhibition to neutral images. Our findings suggest that emotional response inhibition deficits specifically to self-harm stimuli may pose vulnerability for increased NSSI urge intensity during real-time, state-level negative affect. Author Affiliation: (a) Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, United States (b) Oberlin College, Department of Psychology, United States (c) Brown University, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, United States (d) Rutgers University, Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, United States (e) Temple University, Department of Psychology, United States * Corresponding author. Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 700 Butler Dr, Providence, RI, 02906, United States. Article History: Received 12 June 2020; Revised 29 March 2021; Accepted 6 April 2021 Byline: Taylor A. Burke [taylor_burke@brown.edu] (a,*), Kenneth J.D. Allen (b), Ryan W. Carpenter (c), David M. Siegel (d), Marin M. Kautz (e), Richard T. Liu (a), Lauren B. Alloy (e)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A664259790