TEACHING THE GOOGLE BOOKS NGRAM VIEWER AND JSTOR TEXT ANALYZER IN THE GRADUATE MUSIC BIBLIOGRAPHY COURSE: BENEFITS, ISSUES, AND CHALLENGES.

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Date: June 2021
From: Notes(Vol. 77, Issue 4)
Publisher: Music Library Association, Inc.
Document Type: Article
Length: 7,280 words
Lexile Measure: 1400L

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Abstract :

Multiple studies have demonstrated that students prefer Google and other web-scale discovery services over library databases, which they view as too difficult to search. The purpose of this article is to encourage information literacy instructors to include the Google Ngram Viewer and JSTOR Text Analyzer in the graduate music bibliography course. These tools use text matching and analysis to provide enhanced searching capability to the contents of Google Books and JSTOR. Since everything Google is popular and most come to graduate school familiar with JSTOR, student attitudes tend to be more positive than with most library resources. Many are eager to learn enhanced ways to search them. In comparison to many research databases, the Ngram Viewer and JSTOR Text Analyzer are viewed as easy to use. A survey of one class at the University of Colorado Boulder indicated that 100 percent of respondents would use them again. Benefits for the instructor include the ease of learning and teaching these tools, which can be introduced "out of the box." By combining the two, students gain powerful ways to identify books and articles, two vital types of publications about music. Additionally, both the Ngram Viewer and Text Analyzer provide avenues to explore the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education while simultaneously providing an avenue to introduce digital scholarship methods and tools.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A662305786