Effects of task difficulty during practice on learning a dynamic balance task in healthy young adults: An intervention study.

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From: BMC Research Notes(Vol. 14, Issue 1)
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Document Type: Report
Length: 2,384 words
Lexile Measure: 1440L

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Abstract :

Objective Cross-sectional studies reported increased postural sway during balance tasks with a high (e.g., unipedal stance on foam ground) compared to a low (e.g., unipedal stance on firm ground) level of task difficulty. Therefore, practicing/training balance tasks using high compared to low stimuli seems to be beneficial as it addresses larger adaptive reserves. Thus, the present study was performed to investigate the role of task difficulty during practice on learning a dynamic balance task in healthy young adults. Results During acquisition, both practice groups ("Easy" or "Difficult" task condition) significantly improved their performance (i.e., time in balance). Further, the statistical analysis of post-practice performance revealed a significant main effect of test (i.e., better performance under easy compared to difficult test conditions, irrespective of group) but not of group. Additionally, the Group x Test interaction did not reach the level of significance, indicating that learning a dynamic balance task did not depend on the practiced task condition. Keywords: Human, Postural control, Skill acquisition, Stabilimeter

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A665517494