Disease in Invasive Plant Populations

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Publisher: Annual Reviews, Inc.
Document Type: Article
Length: 300 words

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Byline: Erica M. Goss, Department of Plant Pathology and Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; email: emgoss@ufl.edu; Amy E. Kendig, Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Ashish Adhikari, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Brett Lane, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nicholas Kortessis, Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Robert D. Holt, Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Keith Clay, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118, USA; Philip F. Harmon, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; S. Luke Flory, Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA Keywords: disease ecology, pathogen evolution, pathogen accumulation, metapopulation Abstract Non-native invasive plants can establish in natural areas, where they can be ecologically damaging and costly to manage. Like cultivated plants, invasive plants can experience a relatively disease-free period upon introduction and accumulate pathogens over time. Diseases of invasive plant populations are infrequently studied compared to diseases of agriculture, forestry, and even native plant populations. We evaluated similarities and differences in the processes that are likely to affect pathogen accumulation and disease in invasive plants compared to cultivated plants, which are the dominant focus of the field of plant pathology. Invasive plants experience more genetic, biotic, and abiotic variation across space and over time than cultivated plants, which is expected to stabilize the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of interactions with pathogens and possibly weaken the efficacy of infectious disease in their control. Although disease is expected to be context dependent, the widespread distribution of invasive plants makes them important pathogen reservoirs. Research on invasive plant diseases can both protect crops and help manage invasive plant populations.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A633656571