Dietary Supplement Use According to Sex and Triad Risk Factors in Collegiate Endurance Runners.

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Publisher: National Strength and Conditioning Association
Document Type: Article
Length: 453 words

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Byline: Michelle Barrack, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, California;; Michael Fredericson, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California; Francis Dizon, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, California;; Adam Tenforde, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts;; Brian Kim, Departments of Family Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California; and; Emily Kraus, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California; Andrea Kussman, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California; Sonal Singh, Departments of Family Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, California; Aurelia Nattiv, Departments of Family Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, California Abstract Barrack, MT, Fredericson, M, Dizon, F, Tenforde, AS, Kim, BY, Kraus, E, Kussman, A, Singh, S, and Nattiv, A. Dietary supplement use according to sex and Triad risk factors in collegiate endurance runners. J Strength Cond Res 35(2): 404-410, 2021--This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence in the use of dietary supplements among elite collegiate runners among 2 NCAA Division I cross-country teams. At the start of each season from 2015 to 2017, male and female endurance runners were recruited to complete baseline study measures; the final sample included 135 (male n = 65, female n = 70) runners. Runners completed a health survey, web-based nutrition survey, and Triad risk assessment. The prevalence of dietary supplement use and Triad risk factors, including disordered eating, low bone mass, amenorrhea (in women), low body mass index, and stress fracture history, was assessed. A total of 78.5% (n = 106) runners reported taking 1 or more supplements on [greater than or equal] 4 days per week over the past month, 48% (n = 65) reported use of [greater than or equal] 3 supplements. Products used with highest frequency included multivitamin/minerals 46.7% (n = 63), iron 46.7% (n = 63), vitamin D 34.1% (n = 46), and calcium 33.3% (n = 45). More women, compared with men, used iron (61.4 vs. 30.8%, p

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A671307754