"The best scientists are the people that's out there": Inuit-led integrated environment and health monitoring to respond to climate change in the Circumpolar North.

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From: Climatic Change(Vol. 160, Issue 1)
Publisher: Springer
Document Type: Report
Length: 425 words

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Keywords: Environment and health surveillance; Climate change; Intangible loss and damage; Indigenous-led research; Inuit health; Northern Canada Abstract Amidst unprecedented variability and change in climate across the Circumpolar North, increasing attention has been directed towards integrated environment and health monitoring systems to inform responses to climate change impacts on Inuit health. Yet, existing monitoring systems are often not designed to consider Inuit-identified conceptualizations of wellbeing that can help identify, monitor, and respond to the more intangible losses and damages from climate change. This study--conducted in partnership with the Inuit community of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Canada--aimed to characterize what Inuit value and want monitored to develop a conceptual framework for an Inuit-led integrated monitoring system. Using community-led research approaches, data were drawn from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 31 individuals including community members (n=13), government representatives (n=14), and healthcare professionals (n=4) in Nunatsiavut between 2015 and 2016. Thematic analysis of these data was guided by a constant-comparative process. Interviewees described how monitoring climatic and environmental conditions was grounded in land-attachment, reciprocity, knowledge sharing, and self-determination. Findings enhance understandings of how Inuit-led monitoring in the North can guide climate change adaptation that considers intangible losses and damages to wellbeing and ways of living. Further, these findings illustrate how localized perspectives on climate change can contribute to place-based public health research and policy that reflect what matters most to communities. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, N1G 2W1, Guelph, Ontario, Canada (2) School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 116 St & 85 Ave, T6G 2R3, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (3) Labrador Institute of Memorial University, P.O. Box 490, 219 Hamilton River Road, A0P 1E0, Stn. B, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada (4) School of Computer Science, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, N1G 2W1, Guelph, Ontario, Canada (5) Department of Health and Social Development, Nunatsiavut Government, P.O. Box 496, 218 Kelland Drive, A0P 1C0, Station C, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada (6) 'My Word:' Storytelling & Digital Media Lab, Rigolet Inuit Community Government, P.O. Box 69, A0P 1P0, Rigolet, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada (7) Rigolet Inuit Community Government, P.O. Box 69, A0P 1P0, Rigolet, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada (a) alex.sawatzky@ualberta.ca (b) ashlee.cunsolo@mun.ca (i) sherilee.harper@ualberta.ca Article History: Registration Date: 12/23/2019 Received Date: 07/16/2019 Accepted Date: 12/22/2019 Online Date: 01/23/2020 Byline: Alexandra Sawatzky (corresponding author) (1, 2, a), Ashlee Cunsolo (corresponding author) (3, b), Andria Jones-Bitton (1), Dan Gillis (4), Michele Wood (5), Charlie Flowers (4), Inez Shiwak (6, 7), , Sherilee L. Harper (corresponding author) (1, 2, i)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A627971258