Deaths

Citation metadata

Date: July-August 2002
From: The Quill(Vol. 90, Issue 6)
Publisher: Society of Professional Journalists
Document Type: Bibliography
Length: 1,160 words

Document controls

Main content

Article Preview :

Edward De Fontaine, a veteran newsman who was instrumental in putting The Associated Press' radio network on the air, died April 24 in Alexandra, Va., after a long illness. He was 72. De Fontaine helped launch AP Radio in 1974 as its first assistant managing editor. He was promoted to managing editor in charge of the network's editorial operations four years later. In 1982, he left AP Radio to join Voice of America, from which he retired in 1997 as director of broadcast operations.

John Chadwick, a former Associated Press reporter who covered the U.S. Senate for 30 years, died in suburban Bethesda, Md., in June. He was 89. Chadwick was regarded as notably soft-spoken and gracious, although he managed to anger Senate Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson in 1955 with his persistent questioning about an immigration bill, the AP reported. Later that day, Johnson had a serious heart attack. "Ever after, Johnson said 'John Chadwick caused his first heart attack.'" said Walter Mears, Chadwick's last boss as chief of the AP's Washington bureau. Chadwick covered the McCarthy hearings, civil rights legislation, presidential campaigns and Watergate.

Jack Buck, 77, the broadcaster who in nearly five decades behind the microphone became a St. Louis institution and one of the most recognizable voices in sports, died June 18. The Hall of Fame broadcaster underwent lung cancer surgery Dec. 5, then returned to Barnes-Jewish Hospital on Jan. 3 to have an intestinal blockage surgically removed. He never left the hospital, St. Louis Today reported. Nationally, Buck called everything from pro bowling to Super Bowls to the World Series for CBS, ABC and NBC. Buck was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame's broadcaster's wing in 1987.

Elizabeth Shanov, a veteran network broadcast journalist who...

Source Citation

Source Citation   

Gale Document Number: GALE|A90219792