Novel Co and Zn-Phthalocyanine dyes with octa-carboxylic acid substituents for DSSCs.

Citation metadata

From: Solar Energy(Vol. 218)
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 358 words

Document controls

Main content

Abstract :

Keywords Phthalocyanines; Molecular photovoltaics; Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC); Solar energy conversion Highlights * Octa carboxylic acid substituted MPcs have been prepared as dyes for DSSCs. * Pc dyes with Zn center atoms have higher solar cell efficiencies than Pc dyes with Co central atoms. * The glycolic acid substituted Pcs have higher efficiency values than propionic acid ones. * Glycolic acid substituted ZnPc has been found to have the shortest electron transport time. * Glycolic acid substituted ZnPc has been found to have the highest DSSC efficiency value of 2.45%. Abstract In this work, novel octakis (thioglycolic acid) and (mercaptopropionic acid) substituted phthalocyanines (Pcs), having cobalt(II) and zinc(II) ions in the macrocyclic core, have been prepared to be used as sensitizers in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The electrochemical parameters of synthesized Pcs have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry results. The HOMO and LUMO orbital levels of synthesized phthalocyanine (Pc) dyes have been determined and the suitability of their HOMO and LUMO levels with DSSCs has been discussed in detail. The glycolic acid substituted Pcs have higher solar cell efficiency values than propionic acid derivatives because of their electron transportation pathway differences. Among the synthesized metal complexes, glycolic acid substituted ZnPc has been found to have the highest DSSC efficiency value of 2.45%. This complex dye has also been found to have the lowest resistance (8.95 O), longest electron life time (17.19 ms) and shortest electron transport time (0.33 ms) according to electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. Author Affiliation: (a) Istanbul Technical University, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey (b) Zonguldak Bulent Ecevit University, Department of Chemistry, 67100 Zonguldak, Turkey (c) Sakarya University, Faculty of Science & Arts, Department of Chemistry, 54187 Sakarya, Turkey (d) Sakarya University, Biomaterials, Energy, Photocatalysis, Enzyme Technology, Nano & Advanced Materials, Additive Manufacturing, Environmental Applications and Sustainability Research & Development Group (BIOENAMS R & D Group), 54187 Sakarya, Turkey * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 21 November 2020; Revised 24 January 2021; Accepted 16 February 2021 Byline: Cidal Ilgün (a), Altug Mert Sevim (a), Soner Çakar (b,d), Mahmut Özacar (c,d), Ahmet Gül [ahmetg@iu.edu.tr] (a,*)

Source Citation

Source Citation   

Gale Document Number: GALE|A657002946