MG53 is not a critical regulator of insulin signaling pathway in skeletal muscle

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From: PLoS ONE(Vol. 16, Issue 2)
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Document Type: Report
Length: 4,989 words
Lexile Measure: 1500L

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Abstract :

In type 2 diabetes (T2D), both muscle and liver are severely resistant to insulin action. Muscle insulin resistance accounts for more than 80% of the impairment in total body glucose disposal in T2D patients and is often characterized by an impaired insulin signaling. Mitsugumin 53 (MG53), a muscle-specific TRIM family protein initially identified as a key regulator of cell membrane repair machinery has been suggested to be a critical regulator of muscle insulin signaling pathway by acting as ubiquitin E3 ligase targeting both the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). Here, we show using in vitro and in vivo approaches that MG53 is not a critical regulator of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. First, MG53 expression is not consistently regulated in skeletal muscle from various preclinical models of insulin resistance. Second, MG53 gene knock-down in muscle cells does not lead to impaired insulin response as measured by Akt phosphorylation on Serine 473 and glucose uptake. Third, recombinant human MG53 does not alter insulin response in both differentiated C2C12 and human skeletal muscle cells. Fourth, ectopic expression of MG53 in HEK293 cells lacking endogenous MG53 expression fails to alter insulin response as measured by Akt phosphorylation. Finally, both male and female mg53 -/- mice were not resistant to high fat induced obesity and glucose intolerance compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that MG53 is not a critical regulator of insulin signaling pathway in skeletal muscle.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A651393589