Suppressive effects of vitamin C-treated induced-regulatory T cells on heart allograft rejection under vitamin C-deficient or -sufficient conditions

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From: PLoS ONE(Vol. 16, Issue 2)
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Document Type: Report
Length: 6,233 words
Lexile Measure: 1380L

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Abstract :

Foxp3 stability of vitamin C-treated induced-regulatory T cells (V-iTregs) is superior to that of conventional iTregs (C-iTregs). However, the role of V-iTregs in allograft rejection under vitamin C-deficient conditions, such as those seen in humans, remains unclear. We aimed to elucidate the role of vitamin C treatment on generation and maintenance of iTregs from gulo knockout (Gulo-KO) mice as well as wild type (WT) mice, and in vitro and in vivo suppressive effects of V-iTregs on heart allograft rejection in either Gulo-KO or WT recipient mice. Conversion efficiency of iTregs was similar between C- and V-iTregs in both WT and Gulo-KO mice. V-iTregs from WT or Gulo-KO mice showed better in vitro Foxp3 stability than C-iTregs, although there was no difference between WT V-iTregs and Gulo-KO V-iTregs. Furthermore, V-iTregs from WT or Gulo-KO mice suppressed in vitro T cell proliferation better than C-iTregs. Heterotrophic heart transplantation from BALB/c mice to WT or vitamin C-deficient Gulo-KO C57BL/6J mice was performed following adoptive transfer of C- or V-iTregs. V-iTregs as well as C-iTregs prolonged heart allograft survival in WT and Gulo-KO mice. However, there was no difference between the C- and V-iTreg groups. Supplementation of low- or high-dose vitamin C did not induce significant changes in heart allograft survival in Gulo-KO recipients that had received V-iTregs. In conclusion, V-iTregs do not exert better suppressive effects on heart allograft survival than C-iTregs in either WT or vitamin C-deficient recipients.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A651631821