Is comprehensiveness critical? Comparing short and long format cognitive assessments in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

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From: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy(Vol. 13, Issue 1)
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Document Type: Report
Length: 5,671 words
Lexile Measure: 1730L

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Abstract :

Background Comprehensive testing of cognitive functioning is standard practice in studies of Alzheimer disease (AD). Short-form tests like the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) use a "sampling" of measures, administering key items in a shortened format to efficiently assess cognition while reducing time requirements, participant burden, and administrative costs. We compared the MoCA to a commonly used long-form cognitive battery in predicting AD symptom onset and sensitivity to AD neuroimaging biomarkers. Methods Survival, area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), and multiple regression analyses compared the MoCA and long-form measures in predicting time to symptom onset in cognitively normal older adults (n = 6230) from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) cohort who had, on average, 2.3 [+ or -] 1.2 annual assessments. Multiple regression models in a separate sample (n = 416) from the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (Knight ADRC) compared the sensitivity of the MoCA and long-form measures to neuroimaging biomarkers including amyloid PET, tau PET, and cortical thickness. Results Hazard ratios suggested that both the MoCA and the long-form measures are similarly and modestly efficacious in predicting symptomatic conversion, although model comparison analyses indicated that the long-form measures slightly outperformed the MoCA (HRs 1.57). AUC analyses indicated no difference between the measures in predicting conversion (DeLong's test, Z = 1.48, p = 0.13). Sensitivity to AD neuroimaging biomarkers was similar for the two measures though there were only modest associations with tau PET (rs = - 0.13, ps Conclusions Both test formats showed weak associations with symptom onset, AUC analyses indicated low diagnostic accuracy, and biomarker correlations were modest in cognitively normal participants. Alternative assessment approaches are needed to improve how clinicians and researchers monitor cognitive changes and disease progression prior to symptom onset. Keywords: Alzheimer disease, Cognitive decline, Cognitive assessment

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A678012606