Rumination and worry as putative mediators explaining the association between emotional disorders and alcohol use disorder in a longitudinal study.

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From: Addictive Behaviors(Vol. 119)
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Document Type: Clinical report; Brief article
Length: 297 words

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Keywords Rumination; Worry; Alcohol use disorder; Emotional disorders; Longitudinal Highlights * Rumination accounts for the association between emotional disorders and alcohol use. * Worry did not mediate the association between emotional disorders and alcohol use. * Targeting rumination should improve alcohol use disorder symptoms. Abstract Introduction The high rate of comorbidity between alcohol use and emotional disorders is well demonstrated, but the mechanisms underlying their relationship remain largely unidentified. One possibility is maladaptive responding to negative affect, such as worry and rumination. The present study sought to examine worry and rumination as putative mediators explaining the link between emotional disorders and alcohol use disorders. Methods Mediational analyses were conducted using a sample (n = 232) derived from a larger late adolescence/early adulthood longitudinal dataset (Youth Emotion Project; Zinbarg et al., 2010). Results A significant indirect effect was observed for emotional disorder severity on alcohol use disorder severity via rumination, but not via worry or the shared variance between worry and rumination. Conclusions These findings suggest that rumination may specifically confer risk for the development of alcohol use disorder for individuals with emotional disorders. Further, ruminative thinking may serve as a specific treatment target to reduce vulnerability to alcohol use disorder. Author Affiliation: (a) University of California -- Los Angeles, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, USA (b) California State University -- Dominguez Hills, Department of Psychology, USA (c) Northwestern University, Department of Psychology, USA (d) University of California -- Los Angeles, Department of Psychology, USA * Corresponding author at: UCLA ISAP, 11075 Santa Monica Blvd, Suite 200, Los Angeles, CA 90025, USA. Article History: Received 7 January 2021; Revised 11 March 2021; Accepted 12 March 2021 Byline: Kate Wolitzky-Taylor [kbtaylor@mednet.ucla.edu] (a,*), Amy Sewart [amysewart@ucla.edu] (b), Richard Zinbarg [rzinbarg@northwestern.edu] (c), Susan Mineka (c), Michelle G. Craske [craske@psych.ucla.edu] (d)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A660850618