Pre-treatment hippocampal functioning impacts context renewal for cholinergic modulated exposure therapy.

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From: Biological Psychology(Vol. 165)
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 354 words

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Keywords Exposure therapy; Social anxiety; Scopolamine; Hippocampus; Context renewal Highlights * For those receiving SCOP 0.6 mg, enhanced HPC individuals demonstrated significantly less context renewal as measured by SCR-to-CS termination. * Those with impaired HPC receiving SCOP 0.6 and 0.5 mg exhibited significantly less context renewal relative to Placebo indexed by SCR-to-CS onset. * Findings highlight that it is critical to determine who benefits from novel psychotherapeutic augmentation strategies prior to dissemination. Abstract Our recent trial demonstrated individuals suffering from social anxiety with performance-related concerns who received virtual reality exposure augmented with scopolamine, a cholinergic antagonist, experienced significantly less post-treatment context renewal (CX) than placebo (Craske et al., 2019). The purpose of the present investigation was to determine who specifically benefits from scopolamine by examining hippocampal (HPC) functioning as a moderator of treatment response (Placebo n = 15, SCOP 0.5 mg n = 15, SCOP 0.6 mg n = 15). Skin conductance response to conditional stimulus (SCR-to-CS) termination suggested a dose-response relationship for enhanced HPC functioning individuals, wherein individuals receiving scopolamine demonstrated less fear at CX. In addition, SCR-to-CS onset indicated reduced fear at CX for impaired HPC individuals receiving SCOP 0.5 mg and SCOP 0.6 mg relative to Placebo. Our findings, however, lacked consistency across measures. Scopolamine remains a promising agent and additional research required to further understand its effects. Author Affiliation: (a) California State University, Dominguez Hills, Department of Psychology, 1000 East Victoria Street, Carson, CA 90747, United States (b) University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology, 1285 Franz Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States (c) University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, 757 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States * Corresponding author at: Department of Psychology California State University, Dominguez Hills, 1000 East Victoria Street, Carson, CA 90747, United States. Article History: Received 27 December 2020; Revised 14 June 2021; Accepted 9 August 2021 (footnote)[white star] Research was conducted at the Anxiety and Depression Research Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology. Byline: Amy Sewart [asewart@csudh.edu] (a), Anastasia McGlade (b), Michael Treanor (c), Michael Fanselow (b,c), Michelle Craske (b,c)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A680429234