Can home rehabilitation impact impulse oscillometry and lung ultrasound findings in patients with scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease? A pilot study.

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From: BMC Research Notes(Vol. 15, Issue 1)
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Document Type: Report
Length: 3,154 words
Lexile Measure: 1490L

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Abstract :

Objective Exercise has been demonstrated to be beneficial for improving physical capacity and quality of life in people with scleroderma, although knowledge of its impact on the respiratory system is limited. This study evaluated the impact of therapist-oriented home rehabilitation (TOHR) on impulse oscillometry (IOS) and lung ultrasound (LUS) findings in patients with scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD). Results Twelve women with scleroderma underwent spirometry, IOS, and LUS before and after performing TOHR. Regarding spirometry, a normal pattern and restrictive damage were observed in five (41.7%) and seven (58.3%) participants pre-TOHR and post-TOHR, respectively. For IOS, an abnormal result was detected in nine (75%) pre-TOHR participants and six (50%) post-TOHR participants. Heterogeneity of resistance between 4-20 Hz (R4-R20) 20% of the predicted value was observed in eight (66.7%) pre-TOHR participants and three (25%) post-TOHR participants (P = 0.031). An abnormal LUS result was observed in nine (75%) participants both pre-TOHR and post-TOHR. The main change observed was B-lines 2, which was noted in nine (75%) participants both pre-TOHR and post-TOHR. Our findings suggest that TOHR for women with scleroderma-associated ILD improves the resistance and reactance measured by IOS, including small airway disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT05041868 Registered on: 13th September 2021. Keywords: Scleroderma, Pulmonary function test, Small airway disease, Lung ultrasound

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A703920865