Strength Determinants of Jump Height in the Jump Throw Movement in Women Handball Players.

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Publisher: National Strength and Conditioning Association
Document Type: Article
Length: 413 words

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Byline: David McGhie, Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Elite Sports Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; and; Sindre ÈÿsterÈÑs, Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Elite Sports Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; and; Gertjan Ettema, Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Elite Sports Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; and; Gȹran Paulsen, The Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sport, Oslo, Norway; Èÿyvind Sandbakk, Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Elite Sports Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; and Abstract McGhie, D, ÈÿsterÈÑs, S, Ettema, G, Paulsen, G, and Sandbakk, Èÿ. Strength determinants of jump height in the jump throw movement in women handball players. J Strength Cond Res 34(10): 2937-2946, 2020--The purpose of the study was to improve the understanding of the strength demands of a handball-specific jump through examining the associations between jump height in a jump throw jump (JTJ) and measures of lower-body maximum strength and impulse in handball players. For comparison, whether the associations between jump height and strength differed between the JTJ and the customarily used countermovement jump (CMJ) was also examined. Twenty women handball players from a Norwegian top division club participated in the study. Jump height was measured in the JTJ and in unilateral and bilateral CMJ. Lower-body strength (maximum isometric force, one-repetition maximum [1RM], impulse at ê­60% and ê­35% 1RM) was measured in seated leg press. The associations between jump height and strength were assessed with correlation analyses and t-tests of dependent r's were performed to determine if correlations differed between jump tests. Only impulse at ê­35% 1RM correlated significantly with JTJ height (p

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A671348642