Psychopathological networks: Theory, methods and practice.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report
Length: 524 words

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Keywords Psychological networks; Time series models; Clinical theory; Clinical methodology; Psychometrics Highlights * The network approach brings a new view on mental disorders * Methodological and practical challenges hamper moving from theory to clinical research * These challenges include, for example, the use of nodes with different time scales * This paper extensively discusses both these challenges and possible solutions * This will help to overcome current limitations in using networks in clinical psychology Abstract In recent years, network approaches to psychopathology have sparked much debate and have had a significant impact on how mental disorders are perceived in the field of clinical psychology. However, there are many important challenges in moving from theory to empirical research and clinical practice and vice versa. Therefore, in this article, we bring together different points of view on psychological networks by methodologists and clinicians to give a critical overview on these challenges, and to present an agenda for addressing these challenges. In contrast to previous reviews, we especially focus on methodological issues related to temporal networks. This includes topics such as selecting and assessing the quality of the nodes in the network, distinguishing between- and within-person effects in networks, relating items that are measured at different time scales, and dealing with changes in network structures. These issues are not only important for researchers using network models on empirical data, but also for clinicians, who are increasingly likely to encounter (person-specific) networks in the consulting room. Author Affiliation: (a) University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), P.O. Box 30.001 (CC72), 9700 RB, Groningen, the Netherlands (b) University of Groningen, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, Department of Psychometrics and Statistics, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS, Groningen, the Netherlands (c) Centre for Urban Mental Health, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (d) Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, Location AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (e) Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (f) KU Leuven, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Leuven, Belgium (g) RIVM National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, the Netherlands (h) Department of Theoretical Philosophy, University of Groningen, the Netherlands (i) Department of Methodology and Statistics, Utrecht University, the Netherlands (j) Department of Psychology, University of Trier, Germany (k) Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA (l) Department of Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University, USA (m) Department of Methodology and Statistics, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands (n) Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany * Corresponding author. University of Groningen, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, Department of Psychometrics and Statistics, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS, Groningen, the Netherlands. Article History: Received 27 February 2021; Revised 5 November 2021; Accepted 27 November 2021 (footnote)â The authors are in alphabetic order, except for the first author. Byline: Laura F. Bringmann [l.f.bringmann@rug.nl] (a,b,*), Casper Albers (b), Claudi Bockting (c,d), Denny Borsboom (e), Eva Ceulemans (f), Angélique Cramer (g), Sacha Epskamp (c,e), Markus I. Eronen (h), Ellen Hamaker (i), Peter Kuppens (f), Wolfgang Lutz (j), Richard J. McNally (k), Peter Molenaar (l), Pia Tio (e,m), Manuel C. Voelkle (n), Marieke Wichers (a)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A690387991