How shoppers' configurations of demographics, sustainability assessments, and place-attractiveness assessments impact who shops in culturally traditional mega-markets.

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Date: Jan. 2021
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Document Type: Report; Brief article
Length: 284 words

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Keywords Case; Local markets; Place attractiveness; Place sustainability; Shoppers; Traditional Abstract This study proposes and empirically examines a case-outcome configurational theory for explaining shoppers' demographic configurations and sustainability and place attractiveness assessments impact their behaviors toward culturally traditional mega-markets (CTMM). The empirical study here supports the case-outcome theory that recipes of (separate) customer screens (i.e., a few unique complex configurations of shopper conditions) identify shoppers who will (not) shop frequently at the mall and commit high (low) shopping expenditures. The study constructs models from a foundation of complexity theory tenets to propose alternative (separate) configurations (i.e., shopper recipes or screens) that accurately indicate outcomes of frequent (infrequent) shoppers with high (low) expenditures. Configuration theory of shoppers represents a major paradigm shift beyond the currently dominant logic of variable-directional relationship theory and testing. The findings support the general conclusions that CTMM place sustainability and place attractiveness case-outcome configurational models indicate shoppers having high (low) rates of visiting and high (low) expenditures accurately. Author Affiliation: (a) Yonsei University, Department of Clothing & Textiles, College of Human Ecology, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea (b) Yonsei University, Department of Clothing & Textiles, College of Human Ecology, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea (c) Yonsei University, Yonsei Frontier Lab, Department of Clothing & Textiles, College of Human Ecology, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 27 December 2018; Revised 6 August 2019; Accepted 3 September 2019 (footnote)[white star] The authors hereby acknowledge the extensive help provided by the anonymous reviewers and JBR Editor-in-Chief (Naveen Donthu) in their comments and suggestions on earlier versions of this article. Byline: Jaesuk Jung [Gammatyler88@gmail.com] (a), Eunju Ko [ejko@yonsei.ac.kr] (b,*), Arch G. Woodside [arch.woodside@bc.edu] (c)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A648491615