Beverage Characteristics Perceived as Healthy among Hispanic and African-American Parents of Young Children.

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Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Document Type: Report
Length: 526 words

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Keywords Sugary drinks; Pediatrics; Nutrition; Obesity; Toddlers Abstract Background It is recommended that children younger than 6 years of age avoid sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs); yet, 25% of toddlers and 45% of preschool-aged children consume SSBs on a given day, with the highest intakes reported among Hispanic and African-American children. Objective To investigate characteristics that predominantly low-income Hispanic and African-American parents perceive to reflect a healthy beverage, and to examine the influence of these characteristics on parents' perceptions of the beverages they provide to their young children. Design This study consisted of two activities: a qualitative activity where parents (n = 102) were asked to report what characteristics they perceive to reflect a healthy beverage and a quantitative activity where parents (n = 96) indicated the extent to which each of the reported characteristics influence parents' perceptions of the beverages they provide to their young children. Participants and setting Hispanic and African-American parents of young children (younger than 6 years of age) were recruited from the District of Columbia metropolitan area. Main outcome measures Beverage characteristics and influence scores. Statisical analyses performed Characteristics were categorized by the research team based on their perceived meaning. Perceived influence scores for each characteristic and category were compared across Hispanic and African-American parents using nonparametric, Mann-Whitney U tests, and false discovery rate adjustment was used to correct for multiple testing. Results The characteristics perceived to be most influential included those pertaining to perceived beverage sugar and sweetener content, being natural, and containing certain nutrients. Characteristics such as being homemade, made with fruit, and containing vitamins were reported to be more influential among Hispanic parents compared with African-American parents. Conclusions Findings emphasize the need to address misperceptions about the healthfulness of beverages among Hispanic and African-American parents. Differences in the perceived influence of specific beverage characteristics across Hispanic and African-American parents underscore the importance of developing culturally relevant interventions to improve parents' beverage selection for their children. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC (2) Department of Global Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC * Address correspondence to: Allison C. Sylvetsky, PhD, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20052. Article History: Received 22 September 2021; Accepted 6 January 2022 (footnote) STATEMENT OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors. (footnote) FUNDING/SUPPORT This project was in part supported by a KL2 Career Development Award (PI: A. C. Sylvetsky), under Parent Awards UL1TR001876 and KL2TR001877 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or NCATS. Byline: Allison C. Sylvetsky, PhD [asylvets@gwu.edu] (1,*), Son T. Hoang, MPH (1), Amanda J. Visek, PhD (1), Sabrina E. Halberg (1), Marjanna Smith (1), Yasaman Salahmand (1), Emily F. Blake, MPH (1), Yichen Jin, MSPH (1), Uriyoán Colón-Ramos, PhD (2), Karina R. Lora, PhD RD (1)

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A704126109