Biochemical markers of bone turnover and response of bone mineral density to intervention in early postmenopausal women: an experience in a clinical laboratory

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From: Clinical Chemistry(Vol. 47, Issue 6)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Document Type: Article
Length: 3,383 words
Lexile Measure: 1500L

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Abstract :

Background: Markers of bone formation and resorption may be useful as early indicators of response to therapy. Our aim in this study was to investigate the use of bone markers for monitoring of intervention for bone loss in early postmenopausal women and to assess the relationships between these markers and changes in bone mineral density (BMD). Methods: Subjects were randomly assigned to the following groups: a control group; a group receiving calcium alone; groups receiving calcium plus low or conventional doses of conjugated equine estrogen; and groups receiving calcium plus low or conventional doses of calcitriol. At baseline and at 1 and 3 months after intervention, we measured serum intact osteocalcin, serum N-terminal midfragment osteocalcin, serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx), urinary deoxypyridinoline cross-links, and urinary CTx. The BMD of the lumbar spine and the femoral neck was measured at baseline and after 1 and 2 years of intervention. Results: No marker changed significantly in the control group except urinary CTx, which increased at 3 months. Serum CTx decreased in all regimens at 1 or 3 months of intervention. In addition, the changes of all markers at 3 months were inversely associated with the change in the BMD of the lumbar spine at 1 or 2 years (r = -0.144 to -0.314), whereas only the changes of bone resorption markers at 3 months were inversely correlated with the changes in femoral BMD at 1 or 2 years (r = -0.143 to -0.366). Conclusions: Biochemical markers of bone turnover appear to be of use in assessing early response to therapy. Bone resorption markers, especially serum CTx, are better indicators than bone formation markers for estimating the response to intervention in early postmenopausal women. However, the early changes in bone markers were weakly related to the later changes in BMD.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A209406269